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Wednesday, November 6
 

9:00am

Acquisitions for Newbies
Cost: $110, add to your Conference Registration

New to library acquisitions? Wondering what to do and how to do it? Designed specifically for librarians new to this field, this preconference workshop will feature an informal introduction to the basics of acquisitions librarianship from the standpoints of an acquisitions librarian, a library director with a background in acquisitions, and a regional sales manager for a key vendor to libraries for eContent and software as a solution.

The session will cover a variety of issues related to the acquisition of both monographs and serials, each in print and e-formats, as well as large database and backfile purchases. Discussions will include similarities and differences between acquisitions and collection development (and how that can vary from library to library), ordering considerations, avoiding purchasing duplicate resources, negotiating prices and access options, licensing, selecting vendors and jobbers, what a vendor representative expects from librarians, and various services that a supplier’s representatives can provide to assist librarians. We will talk about access versus ownership of eBooks and periodicals and the impact of each on space and budgets both current and future, various ways to allocate your funds, and how to keep an eye on annual expenditures.

Questions and interactive conversations will be a welcome part of this open, relaxed exploration of what it means to be an acquisitions librarian in an ever-changing library environment.

Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the options, resources, and support structures available to them in library acquisitions.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Bailey

Jeff Bailey

Library Director, Arkansas State University
A native of Dayton, Ohio, Jeff Bailey was appointed Director of the Dean B. Ellis Library of Arkansas State University in 2012 after leading the library for three years in an interim capacity.  In his academic library career, Jeff has held positions in both public and technical services, including several years leading collection development at Arkansas State.  Jeff received his MSLS from Clarion University of Pennsylvania when online searching... Read More →
avatar for Linda Creibaum

Linda Creibaum

Acquisitions and Serials Librarian, Arkansas State University
Linda Creibaum is Acquisitions and Serials Librarian at Arkansas State University, where for the last 15 years she has been fascinated at the change in library resource formats and the nature of the “problems” she solves in her work day. Linda has worked in a variety of library positions, including Solo Librarian and Instructional Services Librarian.
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Kirk Gordon

EBSCO, Regional Sales Manager
Kirk had been in educational sales for 26 years, 11 years with EBSCO. He has worked with librarians in the k12, Public and Academic arena in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. His primary responsibilities have been to help libraries in the areas of collection development, acquisitions, and effective use of electronic resources (online databases, eBooks and software as a service). Kirk resides in Dallas, is married to a librarian and is a proud father... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:00am - 12:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

Excelling with Excel: Advanced Excel Functions for Collection Analysis
Cost: $110, add to your Conference Registration

Microsoft Excel offers useful features and formulas that potentially allow Acquisitions and Collection Development Librarians to work smarter, not harder. Using journal cancellations as a workplace scenario, the presenters will provide attendees with step-by-step instructions for organizing data and completing basic calculations with Excel. The presenters will demonstrate how to use several advanced Excel functions including pivot tables, vlookup, and select formulas. Participants will learn how to import and export data, combine and compare data from different sources, and formatting data to communicate more effectively. The session will be held in a classroom with computers (Addlestone Library Room 122), so attendees will be able to follow along by downloading an Excel file with sample data specifically created for this hands-on workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Pan

Denise Pan

Associate Director, Technical Services, University of Colorado Denver
Since 2008 Denise Pan supports student, faculty, and staff success in the role of Associate Director of Technical Services for the Auraria Library. This tri-institutional academic library serves the University of Colorado Denver, Metropolitan State University of Denver, and Community College of Denver. She is responsible for the library materials budget and the overall acquisitions, access, discovery, and assessment of purchased and... Read More →
avatar for Gabrielle Wiersma

Gabrielle Wiersma

Head of Collection Development, University of Colorado Boulder


Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:00am - 12:00pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

HOT TOPICS in Legal and Licensing Issues: Emerging Controversies and Solutions
Cost: $110

Kevin L. Smith (slides)

Judy Ruttenberg (slides)


Join our very first pre-conference focusing on “hot” legal issues of concern to librarians, publishers, and vendors. In this premier installment, Kevin Smith will discuss legal issues/implications of MOOCs (massive open online courses). Next, Bill Hannay will address opportunities and challenges for text and data mining. Finally, Judy Ruttenberg will speak about technological and legal issues for the library and publishing communities in providing access for the print disabled.

Ample time will be allowed for questions and discussion. We will also allow time for the attendees to suggest future legal issues and controversies that they would like to see covered in future pre-conferences.

Speakers
avatar for William M. Hannay

William M. Hannay

Partner, Schiff, Hardin, LLP, Bill Hannay
William M. Hannay regularly represents corporations and individuals in civil and criminal matters, involving federal and state antitrust law and other trade regulation laws.  He is an Adjunct Professor, teaching courses at IIT/Chicago-Kent law school in antitrust, intellectual property, and international business transactions, and is the author or editor of several books on antitrust and intellectual property law, including "The Corporate... Read More →
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →
avatar for Judy Ruttenberg

Judy Ruttenberg

Program Director, Association of Research Libraries
Judy Ruttenberg is primarily responsible for managing the SHARE initiative, which is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. While at ARL, Judy has also directed the Transforming Research Libraries initiative, which included responsibility for e-research and special collections working groups. Judy works closely with her colleagues in public policy and diversity and inclusion in advancing... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Smith

Kevin Smith

Director of Scholarly Communications, Duke University
As Duke University’s first Director of Copyright & Scholarly Communications, Kevin Smith’s principal role is to teach and advise faculty, administrators and students about copyright, intellectual property licensing and scholarly publishing.  He is a librarian and an attorney (admitted to the bar in Ohio and North Carolina) and also holds a graduate degree in religion from Yale University.  At Duke, Kevin serves on the... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:00am - 12:00pm
Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Negotiating with Vendors
Cost: $110, add to your Conference Registration

The introduction of digital content created a new link in the information chain: the license. Almost every librarian responsible for arranging electronic access to information has had to review or negotiate not just prices but contractual terms, adding hours — sometimes frustrating hours at that — to the process of buying materials. But few have legal training, and most non-sales people haven’t spent a lot of time thinking about what underpins successful negotiations.

Negotiating with Vendors brings together librarians and vendors to help you prepare for these discussions. You’ll come away with a better understanding of what is involved in negotiating, why licenses matter, and how to use them to safeguard your rights and ensure that both party’s obligations are made clear. Some of the dizzying legalese will come into focus, and armed with fresh insights you’ll be able to approach license discussions with less anxiety and doubt.

Speakers
NB

N. Bernard “Buzzy” Basch

President, Basch Subscriptions
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director of Library Relations, Business Expert Press / Momentum Press
Adam manages library relations for Business Expert Press and Momentum Press, two new companies which publish ebooks for business students and engineering professionals, respectively.  Previously he was Content Director for the American Society for Training and Development; prior to that, he held sales, customer relations, and customer service positions at the American Chemical Society; and customer relations, marketing... Read More →
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

President/CEO, Gruenberg Consulting LLC
Mike Gruenberg’s name in the Information Services Industry is synonymous with winning results – in sales team development and leadership, in performance and customer satisfaction, and in his own success in selling complex information services into demanding markets worldwide. Mike’s track record during more than 30 years in the Industry is headlined by the significant profit performance he has delivered in every position he... Read More →
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor, UNC Charlotte
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Ward Shaw

Independent Investor
Ward Shaw is a private investor and frequent contributor within the scholarly information community. Previously, he founded and owned the CARL Corporation and UnCover Inc., and served as Chairman and CEO of those companies. He was Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Associate Director of Libraries at the University of Denver, and at Colby College. He holds degrees from Hamilton College, Simmons College, and an... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:00am - 12:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

Off-the-Shelf: E-Book Platforms for Academic Librarians
Cost: $110, add to your Conference Registration

The presenters of this pre-conference will elaborate on the current state of e-book platforms in academic libraries from a holistic, experiential perspective and present important research findings discovered while preparing for this pre-conference and a future issue of Against The Grain. The topics covered will include an overview of e-book platforms including technical aspects and business models, lending platforms, aggregator platforms, publisher-specific platforms, and university press platforms. At the end of the session we will reconvene into smaller breakout groups which will enable participants to meet with the presenters individually to pose specific questions. The presenters include a variety of academic librarians and a publisher whose job responsibilities include developing, procuring, promoting and educating users about e-books in academic libraries.

 


Moderators
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, College of the Arts, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers, faculty and students who are intriguing and dedicated to the disciplines they are engaged in. | | As a Charleston Conference Director I collaborate with other... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amy Buhler

Amy Buhler

Associate Chair, Marston Science Library, University of Florida
I received my Masters degree from UNC - Chapel Hill in 2001. I've held positions as both a medical librarian and now as an engineering librarian. In my professional life I am very interested in how people seek and assess information. My personal passions are cooking, antiquing, and spending time with my husband and daughter.
CF

Cris Ferguson

Director of Technical Services, Murray State University
MJ

Mark Johnson

Director, Publisher Relations, HighWire
avatar for Deborah Lenares

Deborah Lenares

Manager, Library Acquisitions and Resource Sharing, Wellesley College
Deborah has worked in libraries since 1996, and is currently Manager of Acquisitions and Resource Sharing at Wellesley College. Her current area of research is the use of and attitudes toward academic ebooks, which complements her earlier research examining the adoption of e-journals during their early phase.
avatar for John Novak

John Novak

Head, Resource Acquisition, Sharing and Digital Scholarship, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

E-Resources Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
I am the E-Resources & Acqusitions Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. I have been with the Smathers Libraries since 2010, and in my current role since 2012. I received my MLS from the University of South Florida in 2009. My primary research focus is cost, use, and usage studies of e-resources, particularly pertaining to data driven decision making. I am also interested in acquisition/e-resource workflow... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:00am - 12:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

SelfPub 2.0
Cost: $110, add to your Conference Registration

Michael Levine-Clark (slides)

Libraries and the impact of self-publishing on humanities and social science publishing
The self-publishing revolution has created a drastic increase in the number or works being published in the social sciences and humanities. This windfall of content has created an abundance that can be overwhelming, but it ultimately presents an opportunity for libraries to develop deeper and more unique collections.

Who should attend?
This half-day workshop is beneficial for any librarian, publisher or information professional interested in the impacts of self-publishing and independent publishing on library acquisitions. Though more impact has been felt thus far in the social sciences and humanities, this is a phenomenon affecting all areas of materials acquisitions will provide valuable insights for anyone working in this area.

What is SelfPub 2.0?
SP2 is about insuring that the continued democratization of publishing and content tools pushes the mission of the library into the future. We will be producing workshops, mini-conferences and learning materials centered on this mission.

Additional Details and Program

Moderators
avatar for Mitchell Davis

Mitchell Davis

CFO, Bibliolabs
Mitchell Davis is a publishing and media entrepreneur. He was the founder in 2000 of BookSurge the world’s first integrated global print-on-demand and publishing services company (sold to Amazon.com in 2005 and re-branded as CreateSpace).   Since 2008 he has been founder & chief business officer of BiblioLabs -- the creators of BiblioBoard. | BiblioBoard is an award-winning App and web content delivery... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
avatar for Eleanor Cook

Eleanor Cook

Assistant Director for Discovery & Technology Services, East Carolina University
Eleanor I. Cook has worked in the library field for over 30 years, and is currently Assistant Director for Discovery and Technology Services at Joyner Library at East Carolina University. She has had various technical services responsibilities including both monographic and serials/e-resources acquisitions, cataloging and preservation. She was President of the North American Serials Interest Group in 2002/2003. She has been active in other... Read More →
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Bill Gladstone

Waterside Productions
avatar for Deb Hoadley

Deb Hoadley

Team Leader, MA eBook Project & Advisor, MA Library System
BH

Bob Holley

Professor Emeritus, Wayne State University
Professor Emeritus, Wayne State University School of Library & Information Science. Bob Holley has been actively involved in collection development since 1980 as an academic librarian, library science professor, and researcher. He was chief collection development officer at the University of Utah and at Wayne State University. He has taught collection development to hundreds of students both in the classroom and online in the Wayne State... Read More →
avatar for William Kane

William Kane

Digital Publishing, Wake Forest University
William P. Kane is the Director of Digital Publishing at Wake Forest University.  They checked, and he is a librarian, with an MLS from the University of Pittsburgh -- from there something about his having been a janitor, then a millworker, and then a schoolteacher in Pennsylvania, then a systems and collection development librarian in Detroit, then a dot-com adventurer with Alibris out of California.  In any case, he tells everyone who asks... Read More →
LL

Leslie Lees

Vice President of Content for Ebooks, ebrary
Mr. Lees oversees ebrary's content acquisitions, collection development, and content marketing, and works with the executive staff to develop and drive global strategies. He brings more than 20 years of experience in the publishing and information industry. Prior to coming to ebrary, Mr. Lees was Director of Product Management for Knovel Corporation, where he was responsible for content acquisition and marketing as well as collection development... Read More →
avatar for Bob Nardini

Bob Nardini

Vice President, Product Development, Ingram Library Services
Bob Nardini is Vice President, Product Development at Ingram Coutts.  He worked in both public and academic libraries prior to 1985, when he took a job in the academic bookselling industry, where he has been ever since.  In 2007 Nardini joined Coutts and since then has been involved in several areas of the company’s activity, including the development of the OASIS® and ipage® customer sites,  the MyiLibrary®... Read More →
MN

Matt Nauman

Academic Digital Product Manager, YBP Library Services
Matt Nauman is Academic Digital Product Manager at YBP Library Services.  He has been involved in the development of YBP’s Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) program.  He has also been to more of these conferences than he cares to remember.
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Director, Milne Library, SUNY College at Geneseo
Cyril Oberlander is the Director of Milne Library at the SUNY College at Geneseo since April, 2012, and was previously the Interim Director since January 2011, and before that the Associate Director of Milne Library since January 2008.  Prior to that, he was the Director of Interlibrary Services at the University of Virginia Library 2005-2008; and Head of Interlibrary Loan at Portland State University from 1996-2005; and before that served... Read More →
avatar for John Sherer

John Sherer

Director, UNC Press
John Sherer was named the seventh director of the University of North Carolina Press in June of 2012. Prior to that, he was the publisher of Basic Books in New York and also held the positions of Publisher of Nation Books, member of the AAP Trade Executive Committee, and adjunct professor at New York University’s School for Continuing and Professional Studies. He has held marketing positions at Henry Holt, the Brookings Institution and... Read More →
JS

Joyce Skokut

Ingram Library Services, Ingram/Coutts
Joyce Skokut is Director, Collection Development for Ingram Content Group's library services business unit. In this role, Joyce supports publishers and academic and public library customers worldwide, providing her expertise and guidance on physical and digital content acquisition and collection development models for the library community. Ms. Skokut joined Ingram in 2002, supporting customers in product planning and analysis and managed... Read More →
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Purdue University Press and Head of Purdue Libraries' Scholarly Publishing Services, Purdue University


Wednesday November 6, 2013 9:00am - 12:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Refreshment Break
Join us for a light refreshment break to celebrate the opening of the 2013 Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Showcase.

Wednesday November 6, 2013 10:30am - 11:00am
Mezzanine Level, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Charleston Vendor Showcase
Don't miss Charleston's only day of exhibitors - this year is our biggest yet with over 100 booths! Browse the latest products and services, talk with reps, see demos, and snag cool freebies. We can't wait to see you there! Booths will be in the Carolina Ballroom, pre-function areas outside the ballroom, the Calhoun Room, and the Pinckney Room. Showcase floor map coming soon. S

2013 Vendor Showcase Guidebook

Alphabetical Listing of Exhibitors 

Wednesday November 6, 2013 10:30am - 6:00pm
Mezzanine Level, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:00pm

Vendor Showcase Luncheon
Lunch is provided for all preconference attendees and Conference registrants on the showcase floor. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel.

Wednesday November 6, 2013 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Mezzanine Level, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm

From LexisNexis to WikiLeaks: the New Marketplace for Government Information
Cost: Gratis for CRL Members or $110 for non-members; add to your Conference Registration

In the age of e-publishing and open data, government information and records are being exposed in intriguing new ways. More government-generated data and content is openly accessible on the Web than ever before, disseminated directly by government agencies, aggregated and scraped by a variety of applications , and occasionally “exposed” by third parties like WikiLeaks and news media organizations. At the same time publishers and aggregators are changing their game to provide value-enhancing platforms, tools, contextual information, and even analysis services along with historical and contemporary content.

The CRL pre-conference will bring together publishers of government information such as East View Information Service, ProQuest, Sage Publications, and Statista, together with specialists and library collections managers to speculate on where these trends are leading. Some of the questions the session will address:

  • How has the packaging and marketing of government information changed in the past five years and where is it going?
  • What value do the commercial publishers add to the raw government information and data in the form of analysis and tools, and at what cost?
  • How are new media and methodologies driving novel approaches to delivery of government content?
  • What are the potential challenges for researchers, owing to the new trends for distribution of government information?

Speakers
AC

Angela Carreño

Head of Collection Development, Bobst Library, New York University
Angela M. Carreño is the Head of Collection Development for the Division of Libraries at New York University. Angela has led, coordinated and supported the expansive growth of licensed electronic resources at NYU since 2000. She is the primary licensing officer for the Division of Libraries and assumes primary responsibility for consortial collection development commitments. She represents the Libraries on collaborative projects with other... Read More →
JC

Jeffrey Cross

Academic Relations Manager, STATISTA, Inc.
avatar for Catherine Johnson

Catherine Johnson

Product Manager-Lead, ProQuest
As Product Manager Lead at ProQuest, Catherine Johnson is responsible for ProQuest Congressional products. Catherine brings expertise and industry knowledge to her current role at ProQuest as the former Director of Market Planning for academic market legislative and historic services at LexisNexis. Catherine’s 34 years of experience in government information began at the start of her career working on CIS/Index in the editorial department... Read More →
RE

Robert E. Lee

Director, Online Publishing, Eastview Information Services
avatar for Stephen Stesney

Stephen Stesney

Managing Editor, Online Publishing, SAGE
BS

Bill Sudduth

University of South Carolina, Thomas Cooper Library


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm

Serials Resource Management
Cost: $110, add to your Conference Registration

Libraries and librarians are being pressured to work smarter and more efficiently. How does one manage the libraries resources when we are adding new faculty, new courses the number of students and we are told cut our materials budget. Learn some approaches from your colleagues.

Speakers
NB

N. Bernard “Buzzy” Basch

President, Basch Subscriptions
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor, UNC Charlotte
GS

Gracemary Smulewitz

Head, Distributed Technical Services, Rutgers University Libraries, Rutgers University
I have been working in libraries for a very long time, 27 years. Obviously I've lived through enormous changes that are very exciting. The changes keep us on our toes and open minded. I'm passionate about education and politics and very concerned about both and on the bright side I'm very interested in cooking and cultures. I also have strong sporting interests and love horses, horse racing and dogs and almost all sporting events.
SZ

Susan Zappen

Skidmore College
Susan Zappen became Head of Technical Services at Skidmore College's Lucy Scribner Library in 1995 and became Associate College Librarian for Collections in 2001. She has been attending the Charleston Conference nearly every year since 1989, the year Hurricane Hugo tried but failed to stop the conference. Susan enjoys opera as well as ballroom dancing with her husband. She is a Red Hat Society member and firmly believes that chocolate is the most... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Refreshment Break
Join us for a light refreshment break during the 2013 Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Showcase.

Wednesday November 6, 2013 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Mezzanine Level, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:30pm

Vendor Showcase Reception
Visit the Showcase before it closes and enjoy wine, cheese, and fruit at the reception. The wine bar will be located inside the Carolina Ballroom, but food will be scattered throughout the Showcase floor.  Wine Bar sponsored by Springer.

Wednesday November 6, 2013 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Mezzanine Level, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

5:00pm

Juried Product Development Forums
The Forums are focus groups designed for publishers and vendors to gather market input from librarians on the development of a particular product or service, and for librarians to discuss market issues with publishers and vendors invited to participate in a forum.

The Forum sessions for librarians are intended for library staff and will be closed to other publishers and vendors. Invitations will be sent to registered library workers by email, and there will be a staffed sign-up table at the Conference for attendees to register on-site. In addition, publishers & vendors may invite their customers to sign up for this event. Distributors, consultants or individuals from other companies will be admitted if the participating publisher or vendor has added their name to the list of attendees for their session.

Publishers and vendors have a unique opportunity for feedback from librarians regarding the design, features, feasibility or pricing of a particular product or service that addresses internal debates and shortens the sales cycle.

Wednesday November 6, 2013 5:00pm - 6:15pm
TBA

5:00pm

Libprov! Expanding Workplace Skill Sets Through Workshops on Improvised Comedy
Cost: $35, add to your Conference Registration

Nervous about that upcoming vendor negotiation? Worried about that talk you’re giving at Charleston? Unsure about how to communicate your services to patrons? Gain confidence with the uncertain and the nerve-wracking by trying a little improv! Improvisation is not just about making people laugh. At its core is a practice that teaches effective communication and listening skills by empowering players to confidently own and share their objectives.

The Charleston Conference is partnering with Washington, D.C.-based long-form improv troupe, Sistine Robot, to offer a beginner improv workshop on Wednesday November 6 as part of the Charleston Preconference schedule. We will be using improv games and skills to:
  • Develop confidence addressing a group/communicating a message
  • Manage nerves in uncomfortable situations
  • Take control over challenging encounters
  • HAVE FUN/LAUGH/LEARN 

Come in a librarian and leave a LION while having fun with colleagues and friends. This session is completely interactive and requires participation from all attendees. This is a safe space to have fun, be silly, and PLAY! Bring water and comfortable clothing for moving around. Heels/dresses are not recommended. An open mind and a love of laughter are!

Speakers
JB

Jamie Bingner

Washington Improv Theater
Jamie Bingner is a improv teacher, preformer, and coach with Washtington Improv Theater.  She has been teaching since 2009 . In addition to WIT, Jamie has  studied with Magnet Theater and the Upright Citizen's Brigade in New York.  In addition to preforming iwth Systine Robot, she directs the WIT Harold Team People Like Us, and preforms with various improv groups throughout the... Read More →
DM

Dan Miller

Washington Improv Theater, External Relations Director
Dan Miller is External Relations Director for Washington Improv Theater (WIT), the premier long-form improv trainer center in Washington, D.C He is a current member of WIT Harold team Spirit Bear and a founding member of the independent troupe Sistine Robot. He is a member of the WIT faculty and has been teaching for 3 years.
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Product Sales Manager, The Americas, Altmetric.com
Sara Rouhi has worked in scholarly publishing for seven years and manages sales and outreach in North America for Altmetric.com. She speaks and runs workshops on metrics in practice and the scholarly publishing process at library and scholarly publishing conferences worldwide. | | She is an active member of the Society of Scholarly Publishing's Education Committee and currently runs their Librarian Focus Group program. She was awarded... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2013 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:00pm

Out of the Stacks Library Party
BiblioLabs is proud to present the inaugural Charleston Conference library party: Out of the Stacks!

Each year, BiblioLabs will host a party to help kick off the Charleston Conference. This year, the party will celebrate Charleston’s rich music history, headlined by the excellent Jazz Artists of Charleston!

The party kicks off at 8pm, Wednesday, November 6 at the Music Farm. All conference-goers with a badge will get in FREE! All others: $15 at the door, with proceeds benefitting JAC’s educational outreach initiatives.

For more information, visit http://biblioboard.tumblr.com/outofthestacks

Wednesday November 6, 2013 8:00pm - 10:00pm
The Music Farm 32 Ann Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Thursday, November 7
 

6:30am

Charleston Chase and Chug
Join your fellow intrepid conference-goers for an early morning jaunt around some familiar Charleston haunts— 5k or 1 mile, run or walk, go the whole distance or just meet for an early coffee — it’s just a loosely organized* chance to get a little fresh air and fresh coffee (and maybe a fresh t-shirt) to complement the conference’s fresh content.

Schedule and More Info

Maps



*The fine print:  the Chase and the Chug are both non-certified, non-sanctioned, non-Boston qualifying, non-competitive, friendly, sidewalk-only events, and neither is officially or unofficially authorized or sponsored by the Charleston Conference. There will be no prize money, no police escorts, no waivers, no water stops, no fancy porta-potties, no sliced bananas at the finish line— that said, you could do worse than starting your day with a great cup of coffee and some nice new conference-wear.   Questions/comments/concerns may be directed to that one guy who’s vouching for this whole deal as legit: kanewp@wfu.edu.

Thursday November 7, 2013 6:30am - 7:30am
Marion Square Park

7:00am

Continental Breakfast
Thursday November 7, 2013 7:00am - 8:00am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:00am

Welcome & Opening Remarks
Overflow seating available in the Gold Ballroom and Colonial Ballroom

Moderators
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston

Thursday November 7, 2013 8:00am - 8:15am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:15am

Librarians In The Post-Digital Information Era: Reclaiming Our Rights and Responsibilities
VIDEO

The best libraries were never simply buyers and warehouses for information, but something more, centered around synthesis and access and creativity. As the information ecosystem has shifted, forcing our attention to the operational side of How We Manage Information, some of us have lost sight of that. We hand over our shrinking resources to prominent for-profit publishers and vendors because it's How The System Works, without considering what our role in that system is, has been, and might be. It's time to remind everyone that the power of libraries lies not in our passivity but in our action, and reclaim and redefine our roles within it. Drawing on her experiences with the American Chemical Society, faculty perceptions of scholarship and libraries, and local and national conversations about library acquisitions, Jenica Rogers will share her vision of what librarians' rights and responsibilities are and can be in the postdigital information economy.

Speakers
avatar for Jenica Rogers

Jenica Rogers

SUNY Potsdam, Director of Libraries
Jenica P. Rogers is Director of Libraries at the State University of New York at Potsdam, coming from a background in cataloging, collection development, and staff training. Jenica serves as the chief administrator of the Crumb and Crane Libraries, with responsibilities that include short-term and strategic planning, fiscal management, fundraising and donor development, representing the libraries to outside constituents, and supervision of 24... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 8:15am - 9:00am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

Discovery or Displacement?: A Large Scale Longitudinal Study of the Effect of Discovery Systems on Online Journal Usage

VIDEO

In this first large scale study of the effect of discovery systems on electronic resource usage, the authors present initial findings on how these systems alter online journal usage by academic library researchers. The study examines usage of content hosted by four major academic journal publishers at 24 libraries that have implemented one of the major discovery systems, EBSCO's EDS, Ex Libris' Primo, OCLC's Worldcat Local, or SerialsSolutions’ Summon.  A statistically rigorous comparison of COUNTER-compliant journal usage at each library from the 12 months before and after implementation will determine the degree to which usage rises or falls after discovery tool implementation and address rumors that discovery tools differ in their impact on electronic resource usage.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
JM

John McDonald

Associate Vice President and Chief Information Offices, Claremont University Consortium
avatar for Jason Price

Jason Price

Director of Licensing Operations, SCELC
Jason holds a doctorate in plant evolutionary ecology from Indiana University Bloomington where he gained in depth experience as a teacher and researcher. He thoroughly enjoys applying data analysis skills he developed during graduate school to current library challenges. His role at SCELC provides opportunities to work with libraries, content and software providers, and other consortia, to improve library products and expand resource access.


Thursday November 7, 2013 9:00am - 9:45am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:45am

Presentation of the Vicky Speck ABC-Clio Leadership Award
Vicky Speck ABC-CLIO Leadership Award is awarded every year to a leader in the Charleston Conference who has made a lasting contribution to the Conference’s mission. We have given the award to five people so far – Anthony Watkinson (2006), Jack Montgomery (2007), Beth Bernhardt (2008), Heather Miller (2009), Eleanor Cook (2010), Glenda Alvin (2011), and Ramune Kubilius (2012).

Thursday November 7, 2013 9:45am - 9:50am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:50am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Annual Reviews

Thursday November 7, 2013 9:50am - 10:20am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:20am

Scholarly Societies, Scholarly Publishing, and the New Information Ecology
VIDEO

Since the founding of the Royal Society in the 1660s and with the development of disciplinary fields in the later 19th century, scholarly societies have established themselves as mediators of the professional lives of faculty and as vital components of the ecology of scholarly communication. In their interactions with libraries, societies may appear primarily as publishers of newsletters, books, reports, journals, and indexes and databases, but they also promote the creation and diffusion of knowledge by serving as hubs for professional activity, contributors to the making of public policy and opinion, providers of education, representatives of the interests of their members, and, more generally, shapers of the institutions and purposes of higher education.

Society operations and education or outreach programs depend to varying degrees on revenues from publishing programs and membership dues. Today, however, changing demographics and membership decline, the academic job market, the weakening of library budgets, new modes of publishing and media for establishing scholarly reputation, and the importance of making scholarship available to a broader audience than those who can afford to purchase it challenge traditional society roles and especially the business models that have supported those roles .

Panelists will address the ways in which scholarly societies are addressing the current information environment and how societies are adjusting programs and roles as they continue to build and maintain communities of scholars and promote the interests of teaching, learning, and research.

Moderators
avatar for Bob Kieft

Bob Kieft

College Librarian, Occidental College
College Librarian, Occidental College (2008--). Prior to moving to Occidental in the fall of 2008, he worked at Haverford College, where he was most recently Director of College Information Resources and Librarian of the College. From 1974-1988, he worked at the Stanford University Libraries in public services and collection development. A member of RUSA/CODES, he has held a number of positions in that Section and in RUSA; he is currently on... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Director of Scholarly Communication, Modern Language Association
Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association and Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU.  She is author of Planned Obsolescence:  Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons... Read More →
avatar for Brandon Nordin

Brandon Nordin

American Chemical Society, Vice President, Sales, Marketing, & Digital Strategy
Brandon Nordin has served as ACS Publications' Vice President, Sales, Marketing, & Digital Strategy since 2008. Earlier, he was part of the startup team that grew IDG Books - and its best selling ...for Dummies series - into a global phenomenon. He managed McGraw-Hill's college and trade Technology publishing program though the height of the PC and internet boom. While at Cengage/Gale prior to joining ACS, Brandon worked closely with... Read More →
avatar for Steven C. Wheatley

Steven C. Wheatley

Vice President, American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS)
Steve Wheatley is the Vice President of the American Council of Learned Societies.  He holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Chicago.  He is the author of, among other works, “The Partnerships of Foundations and Research Universities,” in Anheir and Hammack, eds., American Foundations:  Roles and Contributions (2010), and The Politics of Philanthropy: Abraham Flexner and Medical... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 10:20am - 11:10am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Awash in eJournal Data: What It Is, Where It Is, and What Can Be Done With It.
Libraries have been collecting eJournal data for some time. With the variety of data sources available, it is often difficult to determine its utility. This session explores the Penn State experience with navigating a number of data sources and their limitations and usefulness to advance library management objectives as well as other institutional objectives. We will look at the COUNTER-compliant JR1 and JR1B data sets and standards (how they are derived, and what issues there are with the data), as well as publishing and citation data (e.g. Web of Science) that shows faculty activity in publishing and their participation in editorial activities - what can we learn from this data? The objective of the session is to stimulate ideas and discussion for applications of the data we collect, ways of manipulating data sets, and including this process in overall analysis workflows.

Speakers
avatar for David P. Brennan

David P. Brennan

Assistant Librarian, Collection Development/Digital Resources Mgt., Penn State
NJ

Nancy J. Butkovich

Associate Librarian and Head, Physical and Mathematical Sciences Library, The Pennsylvania State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Doing More with Less: Exploring Batch Processing and Outsourcing in Academic Libraries
Doing more with less is a challenge facing all libraries. Staff sizes are trending down while technical services work load remains the same or is increasing, at the same time there are new and emerging areas of focus for libraries. Grand Valley State University Libraries have made a commitment to exploring any opportunity to outsource or streamline work flows. Presenters will discuss specific examples that utilize outsourcing opportunities as well as batch processing to keep up with the work demand and benefit the library. Positives and negatives of these experiences will be explored. Factors to be discussed will include: cost, staff time, quality of work, vendor, platform and access issues. The audience can expect to learn what factors to consider in exploring outsourcing opportunities and how to identify the appropriate ways to streamline work flows through batch processing. The experience of the presenters will hopefully help others as they weigh these considerations.
GVSU dedicated staff to working with electronic resources starting in 2006. The experience gained in dealing with large amounts of records and data led us to use outsourcing and batch processing early and often. This experience led us to try outsourcing in other areas we had never considered before, we now employee this method in a variety of ways. We feel we have something to offer the library community from this experience.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Daniels

Jeffrey Daniels

Head of Knowledge Access and Resource Management Services, Grand Valley State University
Grand Valley State University Libraries
avatar for Patrick Roth

Patrick Roth

Head of Systems and Technology, Grand Valley State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Finding Insights in ALMs for Research Evaluation
The use of Article-Level Metrics (ALMs) as an indicator of an article’s quality and impact has dramatically increased in the last year. Publishers continue to add ALMs to research articles and new organizations have been created to aggregate ALMs across multiple fields including usage, citations, and social media. Using ALMs, researchers, librarians, funders, and the general public are able to gain insight into research articles that are the most widely read and used. PLOS launched ALM Reports (http://almreports.plos.org/) which allow users to view ALMs for any set of PLOS articles and visualize the data results. This allows users to quickly explore and compare ALMs for a large number of articles by searching for papers published by researchers at their institutions, for papers funded by specific funding agencies, or by searching on generic terms within an article. The application can be used to access up-to-date information on research papers, to view data on the downstream impact of the research, and to measure evidence of wider engagement with the research. These insights provide a powerful way to evaluate impact of research across many articles in a single view.

Speakers
RC

Richard Cave

Director of IT and Computer Operations, PLOS
Richard oversees the I.T. Operations and Development teams at PLOS. When he joined PLOS in 2005, the I.T. department consisted of two web producers and a few decrepit servers. Fast forward to 2012 - the team now consists of almost twenty employees including developers, support technicians and system administrators. The I.T. Operations and Development teams oversee the internal infrastructure for the PLOS organization, the platform for the PLOS... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Herding E-Cats -- Emerging Standards in Electronic Book and Journal Publishing and Management
As our collections become increasingly electronic, standardization of publishing and tracking practices also becomes increasingly critical in order to better serve our users. This session will describe new, updated, and emerging standards and recommended practices that are designed to support the publishing, identification, and retrieval of electronic materials. It will provide an overview of standards such as Supplemental Journal Article Materials, Standardized Markup for Journal Articles, KBART (Knowledge Bases and Related Tools), DDA (Demand Driven Acquisitions), PIE-J (Presentation & Identification of E-Journals), and EPUB (it’s not an acronym…); how they relate to the work of a broad spectrum of attendees; and particularly why we should care!
The objectives of the session are to demystify the alphabet soup of standards and to highlight the practices that, when implemented, will help us to better serve our users. The audience will be encouraged to ask questions and to discuss. Attendees can expect to learn about a focused, relevant set of standards and best practices and how they directly affect the attendees and their work.

Speakers
avatar for Betty Landesman

Betty Landesman

Betty Landesman has held positions in technical services and electronic resources management in a variety of academic and special libraries, and is co-chair of the NISO Content and Collection Management Topic Committee with Marti Heyman. She is a long-time Charleston, NASIG, and ER&L attendee and presenter on the topic of standards.


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

How Vendor Partnerships Can Improve the End User Experience: Bringing Value by Integrating a Library’s ILS and Discovery Service
When a library chooses an ILS system, it is making a long-term decision but that decision is often made without thinking about its discovery service. However, since discovery has expanded the available resources of a library, unless the systems from different vendors work together, those decisions influence both implementation and end-user experience. When vendors cooperate, libraries can select a discovery service that provides for the unique needs of a library –with the most full-text searching and instant access to full text; incorporation of leading subject indexes and link resolver support while leveraging the library’s existing investment of time and money in an ILS system. This session looks at an example of a successful implementation of EBSCO Discovery Service™ at a site that uses Innovative Interface’s Encore. Emma Lawson from Langara College will address the benefits and opportunities that vendor options provide and how the new hybrid service impacts the end user experience and long-term supportability. Representatives from EBSCO and Innovative will provide background, context and updates.

Speakers
TH

Tim Heiges

Vice President of Sales, Discovery Products, USA & Canada, EBSCO Information Services
Tim Heiges has long been a highly-active participant and advocate in the library industry and has been with EBSCO for greater than fifteen years. In addition to being a regular speaker at numerous regional, national and worldwide library and publisher conferences over the years, he has also served as a Guest Lecturer for fourteen years at the library schools at the University of Illinois, University of Iowa, University of Missouri, University of... Read More →
SH

Sarah Hickman-Auger

Product Manager, Innovative Interfaces
avatar for Emma Lawson

Emma Lawson

Electronic Resources Librarian, Langara College
Emma Lawson is the Electronic Resources Librarian at Langara College in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. She earned her MLIS from the University of British Columbia and her MA in linguistics from the University of Toronto. She like coffee, cocktails, and well-organized data.


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

If You Fund it, They Will Come: Leveraging Grants to Gain Faculty Collaboration
As librarians know, working with limited budgets may be difficult, but finding outside funding is oftentimes near impossible. Despite the associated challenges, some librarians are trying the road less traveled and, doing what they do best, are seeking to learn from those who have successfully found funding and willing faculty partners. This session is for those librarians who are seeking best practices as well as those with best practices to share.

Morgan State University is the recipient of a Title III, Part B SAFRA grant sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education. The grant, which has an overall goal to strengthen historically black colleges and universities, is facilitating the creation of a formal and sustainable cross-campus information literacy program. As a part of this program, Morgan State began a partnership with Credo to extend limited time and library resources while working towards this goal.

This session introduces the partnership between Morgan State University and Credo as it relates to the Title III grant, covering best practices gleaned from the projects, videos and tutorials created as a result of this partnership. From typical instructional videos like “What is Information Literacy” and “How to Find Online Resources” to more subject-specific collaborative projects including Women’s Health and Gender faculty or the Education Doctoral program, no subject is off limits when it comes to Morgan State University’s information literacy efforts.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Francabandera

Laura Francabandera

Librarian, Credo Reference
MH

Michelle Hammond

Librarian, Morgan State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Is the Library Ready for an Emerging Field? The Case of Veterans Studies
How can libraries and archives prepare for emerging scholarly fields that haven't yet emerged? How do we know when such a “discipline” is emerging, and how might we support it?
An archivist at Special Collections and the history/social science librarian at the Virginia Tech Libraries saw signs of research interest about veterans on their campus and elsewhere. With an interest in supporting what might be considered an emerging field, both were aware of the risks of investing in materials that do not attract users. This presentation will examine their process of evaluating those risks while assessing evidence of a growing need. After a review of existing holdings, they began to survey the research landscape for indications of the subjects, disciplines, methods, and constituencies that might consolidate as a discrete field of veterans studies. Further, given the absence of indicators that mark established fields—regular conferences, journals, academic programs—they turned towards a strategy of actively “seeding the need” by engaging in interdisciplinary conversations on the matter of veterans studies and gauging reaction and participation. As a consequence of this work, both librarian and archivist have become active in projects that are creating the very indicators that suggest veterans studies may emerge as a field of academic inquiry requiring library support. At this session, this process and its results to date will be discussed, along with the project's implications for special and circulating collections and, more broadly, the library's scholarly communications initiatives.

Speakers
MB

Marc Brodsky

Public Services and Reference Archivist, Virginia Tech
avatar for Bruce Pencek

Bruce Pencek

College Librarian for Social Science & History, Virginia Tech Libraries
A lapsed political science professor, Pencek often collaborates with teaching faculty on topics relating to information literacy and assessment within disciplines, presenting in both disciplinary and library venues.  With an eye toward cultivating a new academic field, he was a founding partner in creating the annual Veterans in Society research/engagement conferences and co-directed a 2016 NEH summer institute for college faculty, "Veterans... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Knowledge Unlatched, One Year On: Toward an Open and Networked Future for Academic Publishing
Specialist book length publications in the humanities and social sciences (including but not exclusively monographs) are experiencing a crisis. It is clear that the current publishing system is failing both the producers and users of scholarship and neglects many of the opportunities associated with networked culture.

This presentation provides an update on the development of Knowledge Unlatched (www.knowledgeunlatched.org), which aims to improve the efficiency of markets for scholarly books.

Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Let’s Talk About Streaming: Providing the Resources that Faculty and Students Request

Libraries have always provided videos as part of their collections, but advances in technology and bandwidth have made it possible now to offer streaming media. The increased accessibility of streaming, available on any network computer, from on or off campus, compared to a DVD makes the decision to seek streaming a no-brainer. Streaming videos however brings a new set of challenges for librarians: there are few or no licensing standards, rights ownership is often unclear and bandwidth limitations are some of them. In this panel we will be presenting the experiences of two academic libraries and of a streaming video provider.

Baruch College has been providing streaming media since fall 2008, with the advent of a new Film Studies minor. The films requested were feature films, often foreign films, not films easily available in any of the nascent aggregator streaming. We will discuss how we grew from streaming a couple of films a semester to over 50.

You’ll also hear about the experience of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in responding to faculty needs as more courses are offered online and students express a preference for streaming options over viewing DVDs in the classroom or the library.

One source of educational content is Docuseek2, which provides educational streaming access to films from such publishers and distributors as Bullfrog Films. Representatives of these two companies will explain the technical side of working with our libraries, and they will discuss the pros and cons of self-hosting versus using third party platforms to stream video.

This panel will consider licensing issues, access and security issues, and managing course deadlines. We will also discuss issues around hosting (or not) one’s content and what to consider. We will share what we have learned and some best practices that we have developed.


Speakers
avatar for Jim Davis

Jim Davis

President, Docuseek2
President, co-founder and lead architect of Docuseek2, the streaming media platform for essential films for higher ed. Blogging at http://docuseek2.com/wp
avatar for Christine Fischer

Christine Fischer

Head of Acquisitions, University of North Carolina - Greensboro
Christine Fischer is the Head of Acquisitions at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she has worked since 2005. She has an interest in streaming film and in various acquisition models including demand driven acquisitions. She has held positions in academic and special libraries in both public and technical services.
ES

Elizabeth Stanley

National Sales Manager, Bullfrog Films
AT

Amanda Timolat

Media Librarian, Baruch College, CUNY
avatar for Michael Waldman

Michael Waldman

Head of Collection Management, Baruch College
Baruch College, CUNY


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Libraries Respond to Mobile Ubiquity: Research and Assessment of Mobile Device Usage Trends for Academic and Medical Libraries
This session will look at trends in mobile device usage for the Internet as a whole, for one discovery service across all client libraries, and at two libraries: Preston Medical Library, serving the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine and UT Medical Center, and the Joyner Library at East Carolina University, serving students and faculty. Librarians at Preston Medical Library conducted a survey to determine which mobile devices, platforms, and apps were used by our patrons in 2012. East Carolina University piloted an iPad and e-reader lending program in 2010-2011. The results of each are being used to guide service planning related to mobile apps, education and support. The presenters will share their research into mobile device usage trends for the global Internet, for EBSCO Discovery Service, and for these two libraries. Attendees will engage in discussion of mobile device usage indicators and trends in their own libraries. Attendees can expect to leave with an understanding of the current "mobile landscape" overall, for two academic and medical libraries specifically, and with insights into possible futures for mobile device usage.

Speakers
avatar for Eleanor Cook

Eleanor Cook

Assistant Director for Discovery & Technology Services, East Carolina University
Eleanor I. Cook has worked in the library field for over 30 years, and is currently Assistant Director for Discovery and Technology Services at Joyner Library at East Carolina University. She has had various technical services responsibilities including both monographic and serials/e-resources acquisitions, cataloging and preservation. She was President of the North American Serials Interest Group in 2002/2003. She has been active in other... Read More →
MH

Megan Hurst

Sr. Product Manager, EBSCO Discovery Software Services, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for J. Michael Lindsay

J. Michael Lindsay

Serials/E Resources, Preston Medical Library, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

One IOTA at a time: A Case Study of OpenURL Success Metrics
The NISO Improving OpenURLs Through Analytics (IOTA) Technical Report and Recommended Practice state that link resolver vendors should work to quantitatively test large scale data sets of OpenURL queries running through their link resolvers apparati in order to measure success rates and find areas of potential improvement. Adam Chandler, Chair of the IOTA Working Group, will summarize the work of IOTA. Aron Wolf, from Serials Solutions, will give an in-depth case study on how Serials Solutions has implemented these principles to improve the quality of their link resolver product.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Chandler

Adam Chandler

Director, Automation, User Experience, and Post-Ca, Cornell University Library
Cornell University
avatar for Aron Wolf

Aron Wolf

Software developer, Serials Solutions
Aron Wolf as Software Developer at Serial Solutions, Aron Wolf manages creation and maintenance of multiple internal Serial Solutions tools to facilitate automated metadata harvesting from Serials Solutions' publisher partners. Aron has held a variety of positions throughout his career at the company, his extensive background specializing in software development of data driven linkers by writing, maintaining and supporting the... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Open Source Discovery Layers and the NextGen ILS: Collaboration, Integration and Granularization
In recent years, libraries are seeing a trend towards the use of new discovery layers that seek to integrate typical integrated library system bibliographic content with that of journal level abstracts as well as other library produced content such as digital collections, institutional repository content, and other forms of new model library published scholarly content. These types of discovery layers have been built as open source systems such as VuFind and Blacklight and as SaaS solutions such as (Ebsco Discovery Services, Primo, Summon). Many libraries though are seeing options for a 3rd type of discovery layer one that is managed by the library through an open source framework but that integrates content from several different indexing silos. These include the aforementioned library produced content that may be available in an enterprise type index API along with granular article level abstracting that may come from one of the indexing APIs available from commercial providers.

In this session, panelists will present key options for discovery layer implementation from the libraries at the University of Pennsylvania and Indiana University and from work being done by Ebsco Information Services that incorporates their EDS API service into open source discovery layers. Additionally, the speakers will describe how their open source strategies fit with their adoption of the Kuali OLE open source ILS and of the new collaboration between Ebsco Discovery Services as a Kuali Commercial Affiliate (KCA) organization.

Speakers
avatar for Ron Burns

Ron Burns

VP Global Software Services, EBSCO
Ron leads a global team of Discovery Service Engineers and EBSCO’s technology customer outreach initiatives. Ron has been with EBSCO for 10 years and is a software industry veteran having been involved with several web content management and search technology companies throughout his career.
avatar for Robert McDonald

Robert McDonald

Associate Dean for Research & Technology Strategies, Indiana University
As the Associate Dean for Research and Technology Strategies, Robert H. McDonald works to provide library information system services and discovery services to the entire IU system and manages projects related to scholarly communications, new model publishing, and technologies that enable the Libraries to support teaching and learning for the IU Bloomington campus. In his role as Deputy Director of the Data to Insight Center, he works on new... Read More →
avatar for Bob Persing

Bob Persing

Kuali OLE Project Librarian, University of Pennsylvania
Bob Persing currently serves as Kuali OLE Project Librarian for the University of Pennsylvania Library. He's worked at Penn for over 20 years, primarily in serials, which has kept him young at heart.


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Platform Providers Forum
Highwire (slides) 

Major e-journal platform providers will discuss current trends, challenges and new developments in delivering electronic journal content. Representatives from Highwire, Atypon, and Ingenta will be on the panel, which will include time for audience questions.

Moderators
avatar for Glenda Alvin

Glenda Alvin

Assistant Director for Collection Management, Tennessee State University
I am Associate Professor at the Brown-Daniel Library, an HBCU in Nashville, TN. My responsibilities include databases, books, serials, cataloging, document delivery and preservation. I also manage the link resolver and the electronic resource management system. My column in Against Grain is entitled, "Collection Management Matters."

Speakers
JH

Jonathan Hevenstone

Senior Vice President of Business Development, Atypon
MJ

Mark Johnson

Director, Publisher Relations, HighWire
avatar for Toby Plewak

Toby Plewak

Product Manager, Publishing Technology


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

The Social Side of Research and Opportunities for Librarians
The complexity of research has opened up a proliferation of online technologies that offer a vast range of social capabilities, including sharing, analysis, discussion, networking and collaboration. Researchers are amassing information, making connections and learning from each other’s work more frequently and effectively. As resource experts, how can librarians harness the power of these social tools for their institutions in order to meet the productivity needs of researchers and to help advance the research workflow? How can librarians participate within these social networks and further lend their resource expertise? What are the emerging technologies that might shape the future of research?

The audience will:
- Discover the tools that are inspiring researchers now.
- Learn how active participation in the new technologies and social networks can enable librarians to channel their resource expertise.
- Share ideas and engage in a discussion about what the future holds for the social side of research.

Speakers
avatar for William Gunn

William Gunn

Director of Scholarly Communications, Mendeley
Dr. William Gunn is the Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley, a research management tool for collaboration and discovery. Dr. Gunn attended Tulane University as a Louisiana Board of Regents Fellow, receiving his Ph.D in Biomedical Science from the Center for Gene Therapy at Tulane University in 2008. His research involved dissecting the molecular mechanism of bone metastasis in multiple myeloma and resulted in a novel treatment approach... Read More →
avatar for Jeffrey Lancaster

Jeffrey Lancaster

Emerging Technologies Coordinator, Columbia University Libraries


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Transforming a Print Collection
Academic libraries are now faced with the challenge of finding the right mix of print and electronic books. These two formats are not necessarily substitutes and very few academic libraries have the budgets to consistently buy both. The Temple University Libraries is facing an additional challenge – and a wonderful opportunity – the construction of a new library, with a tentative opening date of September 2017. The planning process for this new library is in full swing. Though the story of the ebook is just beginning, librarians and administrators at Temple must make concrete decisions on print book collections in relatively short order. How large will the browsing collection be? What kind of storage facility to construct? What role will ebooks play in the Libraries’ future?

As a result of these twin challenges, Brian Schoolar, head of Acquisitions and Collection Development and reference librarian Fred Rowland are intensively analyzing the circulation of print books at Temple University. Looking at the past ten yearly “cohorts” of print books as well as overall collection data, they are seeking to gain insight on questions such as…

• How large will the browsing collection be in the new library? How will we decide the makeup of the browsing the collection?
• After how many years should browseable books be moved into an ASRS or offsite storage to create shelf space in the browseable collection?

Audience members can expect to see significant usage statistics of print books in the Temple University collections, parsed in different ways to reveal meaningful patterns. The presenters will eagerly encourage feedback and discussion.

Speakers
FR

Fred Rowland

Reference Librarian, Temple University Libraries
BS

Brian Schoolar

Head, Acquisitions and Collection Development, Temple University Libraries


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

What Content… Where? The Art of Selecting Course Content: Tools, Permissions, Analysis, and Where Librarians Fit In
How do instructors choose which readings to assign for college level classes? The variety of materials and sources available to professors is mind-boggling. With research publication output increasing exponentially, where does one start a literature search and how does one filter out the noise? Are there helpful tools which enable collaboration with colleagues or facilitate recommendation by peers? Which formats are essential to today's academic workflow? Does the search start with a bookshelf or a database, with a search engine or a reference librarian? How does copyright status factor into the selection?
HighWire will moderate a panel discussion to consider how traditional course readers have changed. We'll ask professors to share their processes and go-to resources for the preparation and post-course analysis of class materials. We will also look under the hood of an online course materials platform to observe how students interact with assigned content, and how costs and delays may affect that behavior.
Librarians and others who work in the content delivery and consumption space, should bring their questions, issues, ideas and concerns and be prepared to gain valuable insight from the instructor perspective.

Speakers
JK

Joe Kelly

​Professor​, Department​ of English, ​Senator for the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, ​College of Charleston
avatar for franny lee

franny lee

GM and VP SIPX (Co-Founder), SIPX (ProQuest, Ex Libris)
Franny Lee is GM and VP ProQuest SIPX and leads the team.  Franny is dedicated to harnessing technology to make content, copyright and education more accessible and affordable. She is a frequent speaker and writer on the emerging issues at the intersection of campus needs, libraries, online education, digital content and high technology, and serves on the Management Board of MIT Press.  Originally a composer and jazz musician, Franny... Read More →
avatar for Bill Matthews

Bill Matthews

Director of Business Development, HighWire | Stanford University
Bill Matthews is responsible for the business development activities at HighWire including marketing, sales, and strategic partnership. In this role, Bill brings a well balanced pedigree of business practices to HighWire consisting of a consultative communication style, customer-focus approach, and a high degree of ethical standards. Bill has over 25 years of experience and progressive responsibility within the marketing research, online... Read More →
avatar for James ​Newhard

James ​Newhard

​​Director of Archaeology, Associate Professor of Classics, ​College of Charleston


Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:30pm

Maximizing the Value of Library Collections and Improving the End User Experience

Limited seating available - Registration Required

Don’t miss the opportunity to join your colleagues and EBSCO for an informative discussion about how to maximize the value of your library collection and improve your end users’ library experience…

The right services can help you assess the effectiveness of your library’s collection development decisions and build a valuable collection while also creating a rich user experience. Learn how usage statistics can help you manage your collection and workflow while improved linking, widgets, APIs and other solutions can bring the power of your collection to the end user—improving their experience and creating library champions.  

Join EBSCO at the 2013 Charleston Conference, where a panel of librarians and EBSCO experts will share their insights to help implement an effective collection development strategy.


Speakers
avatar for Ron Burns

Ron Burns

VP Global Software Services, EBSCO
Ron leads a global team of Discovery Service Engineers and EBSCO’s technology customer outreach initiatives. Ron has been with EBSCO for 10 years and is a software industry veteran having been involved with several web content management and search technology companies throughout his career.
TH

Tim Heiges

Vice President of Sales, Discovery Products, USA & Canada, EBSCO Information Services
Tim Heiges has long been a highly-active participant and advocate in the library industry and has been with EBSCO for greater than fifteen years. In addition to being a regular speaker at numerous regional, national and worldwide library and publisher conferences over the years, he has also served as a Guest Lecturer for fourteen years at the library schools at the University of Illinois, University of Iowa, University of Missouri, University of... Read More →
avatar for Teri Koch

Teri Koch

Head, Collection Management, Drake University
Teri Koch is Head of Collection Development & Professor of Librarianship at Drake University's Cowles Library in Des Moines, Iowa. Teri’s primary responsibilities include oversight of the Collection Development & Management Unit, the Library’s Liaison Program, Budget Administration, and Assessment activities. She was co-founder of the Central Iowa Collaborative Collections Initiative (CI-CCI) in 2013 which brought together five libraries from... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Welch

Andrew Welch

Librarian for Discovery Services & Technology, Drake University
Born and raised in Iowa, but bounced around from East Coast to Rocky Mountains before landing back in the Midwest. Achieved my MLIS from The University of Iowa in 2003, and have worked in corporate, public and academic libraries, mainly in cataloging and systems. | | I'm interested in library discovery, patron-driven collections and user experience.


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

A Foray into Digital Library Publishing: The British Virginia Project at VCU
My presentation -- "A Foray into Digital Library Publishing: The British Virginia Project at VCU" -- will address the successful efforts to create a digital publishing project at Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries (https://digarchive.library.vcu.edu/handle/10156/3585). This project involved close collaboration between librarians and faculty members in the departments of English and History at VCU, with the project led by Dr. Joshua Eckhardt (English). As of April 25, the project has published its first title: an online edited edition of a sermon preached to the colonizing Virginia Company by William Symonds. A number of details required careful planning for this project to succeed, and I will discuss the library outreach and IT involvement that will show our example and how it may prove beneficial for other libraries considering digital publishing with faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Farley

Kevin Farley

Humanities Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
Kevin Farley is Humanities Collections Librarian for VCU Libraries, and also serves as Library Advisor for British Virginia. He has had a longstanding interest in the cultural role of libraries to widen the circulation of ideas, despite constricting historical pressures. This focus has led him to explore the seismic shift from print to digital and how libraries are rapidly changing both in what they are and what they do -- a mirror for our own... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Can Librarians and Information Providers Foster Productive Discussions Over Product Value, Change Management, and Sustainability?
While it is obvious that technology has been a catalyst for dramatic changes in both the scholarly publishing sector and service models of libraries, there are still various challenges to improving communication between information providers and libraries. In response to technological changes, libraries are grappling with a range of issues, which makes collection development only one of several competing library operational priorities. As a consequence, both libraries and vendors need to understand each other’s notion of value and appreciate the pressures to evolve, whether it be in the areas of virtual collections or virtual services.
This panel will provide perspective on these ongoing dialogs from 3 information providers advisory panels; American Chemical Society, Thomson Reuters, and Ithaka/JSTOR. The goal is to present current methods and outcomes from vendor customer advisory panels in their respective efforts to gather feedback and possibly apply lessons learned. The advisory panel cases will be told by two current vendor advisory panel members per information provider, one being a librarian customer, the other being an information provider representative who also currently serves on the advisory panel.

Speakers
SH

Stephen Hansen

Assistant Director, North American Sales & Licensing, ACS Publications
avatar for Bruce Heterick

Bruce Heterick

Vice President, ITHAKA
JSTOR
avatar for Simon Pratt

Simon Pratt

Product Manager, Institutional Research, Thomson Reuters
As the Product Manager for Institutional Research at Thomson Reuters, I oversee the Institutional Profiles initiative which captures key performance indicators on academic institutions and powers the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. I am also responsible for, content acquisition for research evaluation and manage the Thomson Reuters Research Analytics Advisory Board. | | I have more than 17 years of experience in the... Read More →
GR

Greg Rashke

North Carolina State University
avatar for Tammy Sugarman

Tammy Sugarman

Associate Dean, University Libraries, Georgia State University
avatar for Andrew White

Andrew White

Associate CIO for Health Sciences, Senior Director for Research Computing, Stony Brook University
Andrew has worked in academic/ research libraries for more than 25 years, holding positions as  Associate Director, Associate Dean, and Director. Prior to becoming the Associate CIO for Health Sciences, he was the Interim Dean of Libraries at Stony Brook University. Andrew is a member of Beta Phi Mu and holds a MLS from Queens College and a doctorate from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He has several peer-reviewed and... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Devising New Collection Policies in Academic Libraries: Let’s Be Smart!
Due to the predominance of online resources, reduced or flat budgets, and a greater need to justify services and expenditures to university administration, academic libraries must refocus their collection development efforts. Two librarians from the University of Florida (UF) will facilitate a round table of discussion with librarians, administrators, faculty, publishers and vendors, on this changing landscape and the need for libraries to develop new comprehensive collection policies that are more cost-effective yet continue to support academic instruction and research.

At UF outdated collection policies are being reviewed and overhauled with:
* SMART Collection Policies
(1) Strategic ‘Just in Time’ collection development
(2) Modify traditional selection procedures emphasizing online resources,
(3) Accentuate shared collection projects with library partners,
(4) Revise allocation of materials/resources budget,
(5) Target collection building that supports UF’s strengths

These policies will provide a launching point for discussion with the attendees: (1) ‘Just in Time’ collection development includes patron-driven acquisitions; (2) the preference for online resources is now the standard in most academic libraries; (3) sharing collections and projects with library partners and consortia is a growing trend; (4) the need to revise budgets and allocation methods is challenging and crucial; and (5) many libraries are channeling limited budgets and staff in targeting specific areas for collection building.

Take-aways for attendees will include:
- The incorporation of emerging ‘Just in Time’ principles and plans into the old school ‘Just in Case’ approach of collection development.
- The factors influencing the radical shift in collection development and the ways a library can devise collection policies that are comprehensive and cost-effective.
- Methods to reallocate library budgets to support collection building across a multitude of subject disciplines.
- Collection building strategies that target specific disciplines or collections, including those with indirect staff and operational costs (e.g. gifts).

Speakers
DB

Diane Bruxvoort

Senior Associate Dean, University of Florida
SC

Steven Carrico

Acq Librarian, University of Florida
Steven Carrico has been employed as an Acquisitions Librarian at the University of Florida Smathers Libraries since 1994. He has authored or co-authored a wide range of refereed and non-refereed journal articles, book reviews, bibliographies, and three monograph chapters (in ALA Editions, Haworth Press, and Chandos Publishing). Steve has presented at several conferences and serves or has served on numerous national and state library... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Digital Humanities and Collection Services
With the spread of digital humanities in universities today, librarians may wonder how this burgeoning field impacts library services and processes. While the roles of librarians involved in outreach or digital library services are addressed in professional settings, the role of collection services is under-discussed. Last year at this conference, there was a discussion around licensing and text mining, but the impact of digital humanities could be much broader and involve collection policies and reallocation of collection funds. This session will consist of an introduction to digital humanities scholarship, brainstorming of effects on collection services, and then focused discussion of selected effects with the goal of establishing a place for collection services in professional conversations about libraries and digital humanities. Attendees will hopefully leave with a better understanding of the role of libraries in digital humanities scholarship and with a desire to further promote the role that collection services can play as libraries move to engage this scholarly trend.

Speakers
avatar for John Russell

John Russell

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Oregon


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

eChaos: Managing Too Much in a Transitional World
Too much can be a very good thing, but when is too much, too much? If the constantly changing ebook environment has created chaos behind your library’s frontlines, you’re not alone. “E vs. P” format decisions seem easier said than done while juggling DDA, subscriptions, and outright purchase decisions simultaneously. How does a library respond to new options while managing necessary changes to selection, acquisition and cataloging workflows? Making decisions in a constant state of flux is not easy. If you’re staying in step or ahead of the chaos, we salute you - please share your secrets in both cases! Come to this Lively Lunch to share how the plethora of choices have impacted library services and collection management. We’ll discuss new tasks and how well (or not!) we’re addressing the impact of this transitional collection world.

Speakers
avatar for Helen Aiello

Helen Aiello

Acquisitions and E-Resources Librarian, Wesleyan University
MH

Melodie Hamilton

E-Resources Librarian, Connecticut College
avatar for Beth Hansen

Beth Hansen

Director of Information Resources, Connecticut College
In my current position as Director, Information Resources and a member of the Information Services Leadership Team, I provide oversight for the libraries' Information Resources Team including collection development, acquisitions, cataloging, serials & e-resources and the Greer Music Library. As a team we manage a materials budget of over $1,660,000. Connecticut College is an active participant in the CTW Consortium with Trinity College and... Read More →
avatar for Lorraine Huddy

Lorraine Huddy

CTW Librarian for Collaborative Projects, Connecticut-Trinity-Wesleyan / CTW Consortium
In 2008, I started coordinating consortial activities among the libraries at Connecticut College, Trinity College and Wesleyan University. My primary focus has been on collection development, and over time, I’ve vacillated from being an advocate of practices that favor ebooks to taking a more cautionary stance. The benefits seem increasingly outweighed by issues such as discovery, usability, shareability, and accessibility. For this... Read More →
LM

Lorraine McKinney

Acquisitions Supervisor, Connecticut College


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

How to Thrive in the Digital Reference Revolution: New Models for Publishing, Collection Development, and Information Access
A panel of publishers, aggregators, and reference and collection development librarians will present and discuss transformations resulting from the accelerating shift from print to digital reference works.

Topics covered will include changes to the publishing and commissioning of reference content, new models for purchase and distribution, and strategies for putting authoritative reference material in front of the students and researchers who need it.

In addition to presenting their own experiences, panel members will each present two or three big questions for discussion by the audience and the other panel members.

Speakers
GF

Geraldine Foudy

Manager of Collections, University of Maryland, College Park
Gerri Foudy is Manager of Collections at the University of Maryland at College Park Libraries.  In this position she oversees the Libraries' collection budget, approval plans, and vendor negotiations as well as working with a team on a major collection realignment project.  Prior to this positon, she served as the Head of the Social Sciences Team and was the subject librarian liaison for Government and Politics, Public Policy, and Law... Read More →
avatar for Peggy Fulton

Peggy Fulton

Product Director, Paratext (Reference Universe)
Peggy Fulton is Product Director for Paratext, working with Reference Universe, 19th Century Masterfile and Public Documents Masterfile. She is a librarian and has worked in a variety of capacities in the library and information industry for over thirty years. In addition to her library experience, she’s held positions with Gaylord Bros. and The Library Corporation. She holds an MLS from Syracuse University.
NK

Nancy King

Principal Technical Product Manager, Credo
avatar for Alistair Morrison

Alistair Morrison

Senior Product Manager for ScienceDirect Books, Elsevier
Alistair Morrison is a senior product manager at Elsevier ScienceDirect, recently overseeing the release of Elsevier Reference Modules on ScienceDirect. He has worked in the information publishing industry for over twenty years in a variety of editorial, technical, operations, and management positions at Congressional Information Service, LexisNexis, and Elsevier. He is based in Baltimore, and holds an MLS from the University of Maryland and an... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

I Hear the Train A Comin' - LIVE
VIDEO

"I Hear the Train A Comin' - LIVE" session. Each issue of Against the Grain, Greg Tananbaum's Train column explores what's around the bend on the scholarly communications track. Join us as Lorraine Haricombe, Dean of Libraries at the University of Kansas and Chair of the Steering Committee for SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), and William Gunn, Head of Academic Outreach at Mendeley, engage in a lively discussion about the transformative issues information providers, publishers, and libraries will soon be contemplating. The session will be conversational in nature. No PowerPoints, no canned speeches - just two insightful industry experts talking about access, the role of the library, the state of innovation in the scholarly communication space, and other important topics. Ample time will be set aside for audience questions.

Moderators
avatar for Greg Tananbaum

Greg Tananbaum

Owner, ScholarNext Consulting
Greg Tananbaum serves as a consultant to publishers, libraries, universities, and information providers as owner of ScholarNext (www.scholarnext.com). ScholarNext clients include Facebook, Microsoft, SPARC, Meta, and Annual Reviews.  He has been President of The Berkeley Electronic Press, as well as Director of Product Marketing for EndNote. Greg writes a regular column in Against the Grain covering emerging developments in the field of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for William Gunn

William Gunn

Director of Scholarly Communications, Mendeley
Dr. William Gunn is the Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley, a research management tool for collaboration and discovery. Dr. Gunn attended Tulane University as a Louisiana Board of Regents Fellow, receiving his Ph.D in Biomedical Science from the Center for Gene Therapy at Tulane University in 2008. His research involved dissecting the molecular mechanism of bone metastasis in multiple myeloma and resulted in a novel treatment approach... Read More →
LH

Lorraine Haricombe

Dean of Libraries, University of Kansas


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Increasing the Discoverability of Institutional Video: A Survey of Current Trends and Best Practices
While the volume and importance of video content on the web is growing exponentially and users are engaging with video content in unprecedented ways, rich video assets from academic institutions remain hidden and inaccessible on college campuses and invisible to the wider world. Digital video clips sit siloed and on hard drives and are not cataloged. VHS tapes and reels of 16mm film are boxed in archives, faculty offices and storage facilities. By making video content more discoverable and accessible, institutions have an unprecedented opportunity to showcase their rich heritage and enhance teaching and research for future generations on campus and as part of the global academic community.

The expertise of academic libraries with digital archiving and description of large and diverse digital collections suggests that the curation of institutional video is a natural role for them. By addressing this growing body of video content, the library can play a key role in showcasing the content’s relevance on campus and beyond. But video competes for this library expertise with local print archives and with Institutional Repository needs. Curating video assets effectively will require the development of scalable solutions that address the volume and complexity of institutional media (including lecture captures), the diversity of media and file formats, rights management, and special closed captioning and accessibility requirements.

ProQuest recently completed a pilot project with seven academic libraries where we used automated transcriptions to index video content and enhance its discoverability and usability. Participants will talk about their own experiences and lessons learned from the project and share their unique perspectives about curating and showcasing institutional video assets. An interactive best practices discussion will ensure that attendees come away with fresh, current insights about showcasing their institutions’ rich and unique video assets.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Burke

Jane Burke

Vice President, ProQuest
Jane Burke, Vice President Strategic Initiatives, is one of the executive sponsors of Intota™, Serials Solutions web-scale management solution. In this role, she is providing strategic leadership and working closely with the development partners to deliver a world class library collection management solution. Her expertise in development of compelling new solutions, go to market strategies and global expansion are just a few of the... Read More →
avatar for deg farrelly

deg farrelly

Media Librarian, Arizona State University Libraries
With 40 years experience as a media librarian deg farrelly provides a unique perspective on video in academic libraries. He is the author of “Streaming Video” in the book Rethinking Collection Development and Management, (published by ABC-Clio) and co-investigator in the 2013 and 2015 national surveys of academic library streaming video. (Results of the 2013 survey presented at the Charleston Conference and published in Against the... Read More →
avatar for Robert Murdoch

Robert Murdoch

Associate University Librarian for Collection Development & Technical Services, Brigham Young University


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Not So Fast! Researcher Preferences for Print or E-books
Directly or through consortia, libraries receive offers from publishers to provide more content via e-book packages than we could purchase on a title-by-title basis. McMaster University, a mid-sized ARL, has embraced this direction, subscribing to or purchasing a number of publisher collections – an enthusiasm not always shared by our users. To explore whether we are serving the needs of our advanced researchers – those who need to engage closely with texts – we invited all faculty, graduate students, and upper-level undergraduates to complete a short, 7-question survey identifying their format preferences and use of e-books. By April 2013, we had received over 1100 responses, including submissions from one third of our faculty. This Lively Lunch provides a current snapshot of issues surrounding the use and acceptance of e-books across the disciplines, and invites participants to share strategies around format choice, duplication of print and e- , and support for researchers.

Speakers
JA

Janice Adlington

Collections & Information Resources Librarian, McMaster University
Janice Adlington heads the collections department - serials, acquisitions, and processing - at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and spends her time pondering the e-book marketplace, Big Deal developments, and education trends.  Before returning north of the border, she spent some years as a subject bibliographer and reference librarian at Vanderbilt University and Trinity College (Hartford).  
WW

Wade Wyckoff

Associate University Librarian, Collections, McMaster University Library
Wade Wyckoff joined McMaster University Library in 2006, where he is currently Associate University Librarian, Collections. Previously, he held appointments as Cataloguing Policy Librarian and Collection Services Librarian with the University Library. Before coming to McMaster, Wade was an Archivist with the U.S. Navy’s History and Heritage Command. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in History and an M.L.S., all from Indiana University.


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Rompiendo Barreras: Reorganizing Technical & Digital Services in a Small Academic Library
The Olin Library at Rollins College is a 2013 winner of the ACRL Excellence in Academic Libraries Award. In May 2012, the library’s new Collections & Systems Department began reorganizing from being two separate units-- rethinking roles, workflows, and procedures. A small department with a wide range of responsibilities, C&S has 4 staff and 3 librarian positions, doing everything from acquisitions to systems to interlibrary loan. We’ll talk about how the department has focused on mutual respect as the basis for full collaboration in merging two departments, flattening the reporting structure, completely redefining some positions, streamlining workflows, literally breaking down walls, and establishing a highly flexible department that will adapt as resources change. We invite anyone interested in reorganizing technical and digital services-- especially but not only in small libraries-- to come and share your own ideas and experiences about making sure all the employees are leading change together. We’ll share what works for us, and in an open and informal discussion, we want to hear what works for you, and/or ideas you’d love to try.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Harwell

Jonathan Harwell

Head of Collections & Systems, Rollins College
Jonathan H. Harwell has previously served as guest editor and peer reviewer for Against the Grain. He is Head of Collections & Systems at Rollins College, and was previously a librarian at Georgia Southern University, the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Berry College. He holds an MLIS from The University of Alabama, an MA in Social Science from Georgia Southern University, and a BA in English from the University of Southern Mississippi... Read More →
avatar for Sharon Williams

Sharon Williams

Acquisitions/Office Coordinator, Rollins College
Sharon P. Williams joined Rollins College seven years ago coming from a public library environment. It has been a great experience for her to work in an academic library and integrating what she learned in her previous position. She loves contributing to and working around young people. On her off time she enjoy gardening, sewing and reading.


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Selling Academic Materials Directly to End-users
A good part of the market--indeed, in some instances the entire market--for such materials as journals and scholarly monographs lies in sales to libraries, which represent their communities. Some journals publishers report that 85% of their sales go to libraries. Even academic book publishers (e.g., university presses) report sales to libraries in the range of 25%. For a number of reasons, including the tightening of library budgets, many publishers are now seeking to get access to an academic audience without restricting their sales to libraries. This kind of marketing is called "direct-to-consumer" and often abbreviated as D2C.
This panel will explore initiatives to sell academic materials D2C. There is no one way to do this; the panel represents a wide range of D2C options. Some D2C services are for materials that have found receptive audiences in libaries, but some are tailored for the direct sales market without any history of selling materials to institutions. What they all have in common is that for these services, the customer and the consumer are one and the same.

Speakers
MB

Micah Bowers

CEO, Bluefire
LB

Laura Brown

Managing Director, JSTOR
JE

Joseph Esposito

President, Processed Media
Management consultant in the area of publishing strategy and digital media. Clients include for-profits and not-for-profits alike. Recent engagements have been with software companies, society publishers, and academic library services. Primarily work with boards of directors and CEOs on setting organizational direction, mergers and acquisitions, and the development of new programs.
WP

William Park

CEO, DeepDyve
DeepDyve's mission is to empower information professionals worldwide by making authoritative research more simple and affordable to access. CEO William ("Bill") Park joined DeepDyve as chief executive officer in 2008. Previously, he served at Acxiom Corporation (NSDQ: ACXM) where he led the company’s Data, Digital and Direct Marketing Services Organization. Mr. Park joined Acxiom in 2005 thru its acquisition of Digital Impact (NSDQ: DIGI) where... Read More →
avatar for Bob Weinschenk

Bob Weinschenk

CEO, SIPX
Bob Weinschenk is Chief Executive Officer of SIPX. Bob has a proven track record as a startup-entrepreneur across multiple and diverse industries. Prior to joining SIPX, Bob was Chief Executive Officer of SmartyPig, a social-networking enabled financial platform that encourages smart savings by allowing users to share their goals and invite friends and family to contribute. He was also Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Barfly Interactive... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Who Will Do Non-Profit Scholarly Publishing in the Future, and How?
This session will survey what has been happening with academic publishing as done not only by traditional publishers like scholarly societies and university presses but also, more recently, by libraries that have begun to offer a variety of publishing services to their constituencies, with some formally organizing as the Library Publishing. The discussion will ask how the traditional publishers have been adapting to new challenges confronted in the digital environment, including the advocacy of open access, and what roles the new players have been attempting to fill as pressures on them to provide new services increase. Five speakers will present brief overviews of what is happening in their arenas, to be followed by open discussion with the audience. Attendees will learn what is happening at the cutting edge of change in scholarly publishing.

Moderators
ST

Sandy Thatcher

Former Director, Penn State Univ Press

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Director of Scholarly Communication, Modern Language Association
Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association and Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU.  She is author of Planned Obsolescence:  Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons... Read More →
BG

Bryn Geffert

Librarian of the College, Amherst College
MM

Micheal Miyazaki

Documentation Training Specia, American Psychological Association
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Director, Milne Library, SUNY College at Geneseo
Cyril Oberlander is the Director of Milne Library at the SUNY College at Geneseo since April, 2012, and was previously the Interim Director since January 2011, and before that the Associate Director of Milne Library since January 2008.  Prior to that, he was the Director of Interlibrary Services at the University of Virginia Library 2005-2008; and Head of Interlibrary Loan at Portland State University from 1996-2005; and before that served... Read More →
avatar for Tyler Walters

Tyler Walters

Dean, University Libraries, and Professor, Virginia Tech
Tyler Walters is Dean, University Libraries and Professor, Virginia Tech. He is a 2009-10 Research Libraries Leadership Fellow of the Association of Research Libraries. Walters serves on the board of directors of DuraSpace, the Educopia Institute, and is a governing board member of the Academic Preservation Trust. He is a co-founder of the Library Publishing Coalition and has previously served on the steering committee of the Coalition of... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

You Bought a New Resource—Now How Do You Get People to Use It? A Library, a Consortium, and a Publisher Explain What They’re Doing and How It’s Working.
From every stakeholder’s perspective, identifying resources, finding the funding, and adding an electronic product to the library’s holdings are all just the beginning. The library needs to demonstrate that the investment was wise and is being well used. The consortium wants to do best for members, not just in the negotiation and acquisition stages, but for the long term. The publisher wants to help customers increase usage and looks for faculty engagement to help grow the resource in the best way.

The librarians from the University of Notre Dame will discuss past challenges and new approaches, their methods for defining and measuring success (is it usage alone?), and early signs coming from efforts to date. Cindy Clennon from CARLI will explain a recent big deal to purchase six large academic video collections for each member library, and she’ll describe how everyone is working together to integrate the content into the knowledge fiber of the institutions. Eileen Lawrence from Alexander Street will discuss the company’s expanding projects for supporting libraries’ efforts with training, materials, and outreach, and how partnership efforts like those with CARLI and Notre Dame can make the difference.

We will invite each attendee to join in a lively discussion, sharing information about ideas you’ve tried at your own library and what you learned.

Moderators
avatar for Eileen Lawrence

Eileen Lawrence

Senior Vice President, Alexander Street Press
Eileen has worked with academic libraries since 1980. She is a co-founder of Alexander Street Press, having served previously as Vice President of Sales at Chadwyck-Healey, Inc.  She created and works with Alexander Street’s sales teams globally, manages key customer relationships, and has worked with regional and national consortia around the world. Eileen received a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from the University of... Read More →

Speakers
CC

Cindy Clennon

Director, Electronic Resources, CARLI (Consortium of Academic Research Libraries in Illinois)
AL

Andrea Langhurst

Program Director, Resource Acquisitions & Discovery, University of Notre Dame
Andrea Langhurst is currently Program Director for Resource Acquisitions and Discovery at the University of Notre Dame, Hesburgh Libraries. Andy has been at Notre Dame since 2008, previously working as Licensing/Acquisitions Librarian and unit manager for the Electronic Resources and Acquisitions Pay Services unit.
avatar for Monica Moore

Monica Moore

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Notre Dame
Monica Moore is an Electronic Resources Librarian at the University of Notre Dame. She graduated from Syracuse University with her M.L.I.S. in 2008. In addition to electronic resource management and support, she has been reviewing licenses for electronic content acquisition since 2013. In recent years she has become involved with post-acquisition questions related to text mining agreements, data sets, and rights questions related to library... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

You Can’t Have Too Much Electronic Resources Staffing
Two years ago Auburn University Libraries created a new Electronic Resources and Serials Services (ERSS) Unit to create a cohesive, highly responsive, and forward moving team. This newly created unit wanted to do things right, well, and strategically. When the team reflected upon the current staffing situation the following issues emerged: (1) doing “more with less” was not a recipe for success; (2) projects were a far-away dream; and (3) having too little documentation was dangerous for succession. In addition the Unit Head was assuming more administrative assignments making delegation of tasks not possible for this small and full to capacity work group. Thus was born the decision to create and hire a new tenure-track librarian, the Serials Acquisitions Librarian. It has now been two years since hiring this new librarian.

Three members of Auburn’s ERSS unit: the department head, the new librarian, and the serials associate will talk about their experiences with adding a new electronic resources expert. Topics covered will include: (1) progress to date on addressing weak areas of service, (2) challenges with hiring a person proficient with electronic resources trouble shooting and cataloging, but less so with acquisitions, and (3) areas needing more attention.

Engagement with the audience will be fostered through dialog on aspects of training staff, writing documentation, building teamwork, planning for succession, and handling sudden departures of key personnel.

Speakers
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Shade Aladebumoye

Library Associate for Serials, Auburn University
Shade Aladebumoye is the Library Associate for Serials and has been at Auburn University Libraries since 1995. She manages the ordering and invoicing of serials in all formats, oversees bindery operations and has expanded her role to include electronic resource trouble-shooting.
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Nadine P. Ellero

Head of Technical Services, Auburn University
Nadine P. Ellero is Head of Technical Services at Auburn University Libraries, in Auburn, Alabama. Before Auburn, she was the Intellectual Access/Metadata Services Librarian at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library at the University of Virginia (1990-2011).   Nadine presently serves on the Editorial Board of Library Resources & Technical Services and Co-Coordinator for the ALCTS e-Forums. Her professional interests include... Read More →
avatar for Paula Sullenger

Paula Sullenger

Head, Electronic Resources and Serials Services, Auburn University
I currently work mainly with electronic resources but I'm interested in all aspects of Technical Services, as well as collection development, assessment, and scholarly communication.


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

“Eat Yourself Full, Leave Your Plate Empty:” or Why Student and Faculty Appetite for Data is like an Offensive Lineman at a Buffet
From an old postcard of Miller’s Smorgasbord (on the Lincoln Highway east of Lancaster Pennsylvania) we see the sign that stands over the scrumptious buffet welcoming all patrons at the restaurant: “Eat Yourself Full, Leave Your Plate Empty.” The notion is simple - take what you can eat - but do not waste food. But in many ways, the whole premise of a buffet is the ability to try, sample, nibble and experiment with foods that you might not order otherwise order. And we all pay the same, even if we are a college football offensive lineman with a legendary appetite.

It is this conundrum that leads us into problems between libraries and the database vendors. Librarians scramble to keep the balance between the student needs of getting and analyzing data with the vendors’ need to keep the systems working and not to be over-burdened with royalty payments to the publishers. Increasingly, we see faculty and students wanting to download more data, but vendors too quick to install restrictions out of intellectual property concerns . In this “Eat Yourself Full” database environment, our students and faculty want to download more and more to analyze and interpret on their own.

The presenters will explore the issues of downloading caps and other obstacles at the business libraries of three large U.S. Public Universities (Illinois, Michigan and UCLA). Among the topics discussed will be the topics that drive this research, the types of resources they wish to use, the impact of the limits imposed on the students and faculty, and the workarounds that connected the user to the data that they needed.

Speakers
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Angela Horne

Head, Rosenfeld Management Library, UCLA Anderson School of Management
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan, Ross School of Business
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction project in 2016. Corey has been director since October 2006 and previously worked as the Associate Dean for Resource and Systems Management at the... Read More →
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Rebecca Smith

Business Librarian, College of Business Digital Research Library (U of Illinois)


Thursday November 7, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Adding PDA for Print? Consider Your Options for Implementation
After three years of doing electronic book PDA with EBL, Cowles Library decided to expand our PDA offerings to include print. Some of the reasons for expanding the EBL program to include print were low usage of approval books; librarian uncertainty about which slips to purchase; a desire to make more efficient usage of acquisition funds; and our desire to determine if PDA was a workable acquisitions model for print materials.

This presentation will discuss the factors the Library considered in selecting a vendor, including the ability to integrate the two formats without duplication, technical considerations, and real-time stock availability to enable rush delivery. Additionally, the presentation will discuss librarian and teaching faculty roles in developing PDA profiles, and profile considerations (e.g., selection of format, delay in electronic publication, costs).

Cowles Library worked closely with the vendor Ingram Coutts to develop the integrated print & ebook plan. The vendor representative will compare Cowles Library’s approach to print PDA with other customers, and share details of the choices libraries have when establishing a print PDA plan (determining which titles should be included in the PDA, mediated vs. direct to vendor ordering, collecting information about the requesting patron, stock check and rush delivery, etc.) These comparisons will show how the choices made by Cowles Library staff, along with the energy invested in setting up the plan and integrating it into the catalog, make this print PDA a great example of best practices for others to follow.

Finally, we will discuss developing metrics for determining the success of the project, and future considerations, including refining existing profiles, expanding subject areas, budget impact, developing weeding method for records in the catalog.

Speakers
avatar for Teri Koch

Teri Koch

Head, Collection Management, Drake University
Teri Koch is Head of Collection Development & Professor of Librarianship at Drake University's Cowles Library in Des Moines, Iowa. Teri’s primary responsibilities include oversight of the Collection Development & Management Unit, the Library’s Liaison Program, Budget Administration, and Assessment activities. She was co-founder of the Central Iowa Collaborative Collections Initiative (CI-CCI) in 2013 which brought together five libraries from... Read More →
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Lisa McDonald

Account Manager, Ingram Coutts
avatar for Andrew Welch

Andrew Welch

Librarian for Discovery Services & Technology, Drake University
Born and raised in Iowa, but bounced around from East Coast to Rocky Mountains before landing back in the Midwest. Achieved my MLIS from The University of Iowa in 2003, and have worked in corporate, public and academic libraries, mainly in cataloging and systems. | | I'm interested in library discovery, patron-driven collections and user experience.


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Breaking New Ground: A Demand Driven Ebook Model in a Multi-type Library Environment
For all libraries, the landscape of ebook access models, content choices and platforms are changing with exponential speed. Library budgets continue to decrease, driving new modes of collaboration. Learn how the NY 3Rs Association Inc. is addressing the needs of its academic and public library members through a multi-phased ebook initiative that leverages differences among members to expand content scope and enhance resource sharing. Using EBL as a vendor, the initiative is a user-based demand driven project involving public library systems and all types of academic libraries – perhaps one of the few multi-type DDA ebook pilots currently in place.

This session will share results from phase one (August 20122 to May 2013) of the pilot initiative which operated under a multiplier model as well as provide preliminary information on phase 2 which is operating under a limited-use model. Issues such as publisher participation, multi-type collaboration, cost-share models, and shattering of some long-held assumptions will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Cunningham-Hendrix

Kate Cunningham-Hendrix

Collections Project Manager, University at Buffalo
Kate serves as chair of the University at Buffalo (UB) Ebooks Task Force, member of the WNYLRC Resource Sharing Committee and is the research libraries representative for the NY3Rs Ebooks Advisory Group. Before coming to UB in 2004 she was a humanities librarian at Colorado State University.
avatar for Sheryl Knab

Sheryl Knab

Executive Director, Western New York Library Resources Council (WNYLRC)
Sheryl Knab is the Executive Director for the Western New York Library Resources Council (WNYLRC) one of 9 Reference and Resources Councils (NY3Rs) chartered in New York State under the New York State Library. WNYLRC is a multi-type consortium with 63 member public and school libraries and library systems, academic, hospital, museum, archival, and corporate libraries. Sheryl’s current focus is on collaborative library services both regionally... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Developing a Statewide Print Repository in Florida: The UCF Experience with FLARE

Many academic libraries are struggling with collections size reaching or exceeding building capacity.  Meanwhile, the movement of “21st Century Libraries” calls for user centered space. The combination of these two factors has challenged libraries to identify ways to eliminate physical collections without losing access to content.

The academic libraries in the State of Florida, including the University of Central Florida (UCF), have discussed and developed plans for a shared print repository for several years. For the past few years a state wide Shared Storage Task Force was convened with representation from the state university libraries; and eventually formed the FLorida Academic REpository (FLARE) under the leadership of University of Florida.

In 2012, FLARE received the first large shipment from a participating library. After a few months of active planning, UCF implemented its project preparing our materials to send to FLARE, and is poised to be the next library contributing to FLARE.

As presented, the UCF FLARE project requires tremendous coordination and collaboration within the multiple units in the Technical Services Division at UCF, and with the external FLARE Team in Gainesville. Policies and procedures were developed with guidance from the FLARE Team; and internal workflow was designed to ensure accurate processing. Maintaining clear communication with the Public Services Division is also critical.

This presentation will give an overview of the FLARE project and its evolution, and share UCF’s experience in selecting and processing materials for this shared storage facility.

 


Speakers
avatar for Michael Arthur

Michael Arthur

Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development, University of Central Florida
Michael Arthur is Head of Acquisitions & Collection Services at the University of Central Florida. Michael received his Bachelor of Science in Sport Marketing & Management in 1991, and his Master of Library Science in 1999, from Indiana University in Bloomington. He received his Master of Public Administration from Old Dominion University in 2006. Michael is active in ALA, and the North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG), and... Read More →
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Ying Zhang

Acquisitions Librarian, Univ. of Central Florida
Ying is the Acquisitions Librarian at the Univ. of Central Florida Libraries. Her main responsibilities include overseeing operations in both monograph and serials. Prior to moving into Technical Services, Ying had built a career in Public Services in academic libraries providing reference services to the academic community, teaching library instructions to both graduate and undergraduate classes, building collections in various subject areas... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Discovery and Collections: When Too Much is Definitely Not Enough
As academic library collections have become more a proliferation of silo e-resources than a managed collection, discovery systems have become necessary for libraries to represent this vast ocean of content as a single collection. New content seems to just show up, especially with the growing open-access movement. Ebooks and resources that were buried in individual database silos are now as findable and the regular monographic collection. Leased ebook collections such as Springer, Ebrary, or Ebsco instantly add 100,000 titles instantly and these collections keep growing. The discovery systems are moving targets of development and continue to find ways to incorporate more content while also organizing it better. Patron-driven- acquisition exposes thousands of titles and invites patrons to select for themselves. Are we now in the post-collection-development age? Should discovery be focused on the individual library digital/print collection? Or open-ended where the “Amazon-like” library is primarily a procurement service? Panelists Andy Perry (SUNY Oneonta, Oneonta, NY), Rob Zylstra (MacEwan University, Edmonton, Alberta), and Ron Burns (Vice President of Global Software Services, EBSCO Information Services) all are involved with the Ebsco Discovery Service (EDS), how it affects libraries, and how it is likely to evolve. EDS, Summon, Primo, and WorldCat Local all fundamentally change how patrons will be viewing library collections that are both too much while always not enough. This topic is broad and provocative and we’ll be inviting the audience to weigh in on these existential questions. There should be a lot of opinions.

Speakers
avatar for Ron Burns

Ron Burns

VP Global Software Services, EBSCO
Ron leads a global team of Discovery Service Engineers and EBSCO’s technology customer outreach initiatives. Ron has been with EBSCO for 10 years and is a software industry veteran having been involved with several web content management and search technology companies throughout his career.
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Andrew Perry

Head of Library Technologies, Milne Library, SUNY Oneonta, Oneonta NY
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Robert Zylstra

Campus Librarian, MacEwan University


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Effective E-browsing: Access, Discovery, and Connections.
Browsing is an essential component to discovery. Understanding the foundations of browsing patterns and preferences is crucial in developing effective e-browsing environments. It’s important to understand the way researchers in diverse disciplines have described their discoveries in terms of browsing and searching. Examining the works of scientists, social scientists, and humanists through the lens of discovery will reveal essential components to be aware of in developing e-browsing environments. In turning to a wide range of sources, often outside traditional library literature, we deepen our understanding of what it means to browse in an electronic environment and more effectively articulate concerns and opportunities to developers.

Speakers
avatar for Nina Clements

Nina Clements

Reference Librarian, Penn State University, Brandywine Campus
I work with professors to more thoroughly integrate research skills and services into the curriculum. Also: reader, editor, wordsmith, and cat wrangler.
avatar for Kate Joranson

Kate Joranson

Head, Frick Fine ArtsLibrary, University of Pittsburgh
Browsing, with both electronic and print collections. Digital humanities projects, space planning and renovations. Also, drawing, knitting, gardening.
avatar for Steve VanTuyl

Steve VanTuyl

Emerging Technologies Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University
Emerging Technologies Librarian at Carnegie Mellon University. Also: data jockey, info-schemer, research flunkie, recovering scientist, yeast wrangler


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Engaging Students through Social Media
Social media is such an intrinsic part of the way students interact, it is natural that academic libraries would consider making services available and building community with students through these communication channels. Many academic libraries are on Facebook and Twitter, but are not successfully engaging with students. Understanding how students view and engage through social media is foundational to developing a program.
The first part of this session will include research findings from a comprehensive study on how students engage through social media and potential uses. Attendees will gain insight to the distinctive behaviors between undergraduate and graduate students, as well as usage preference between the communication channels. Recommendations will be made to help libraries foster engagement using the communication channels that are most useful and relevant to their students.
The second part of the session will provide an overview of the highly successful use of Instagram for teaching and learning at UCLA. Attendees will learn how to connect with undergraduates in a meaningful way and favorably position the library as the catalyst for building community with students on campus, fostering teaching and learning, and exposing students to special collections. Specific examples will be shown and future opportunities discussed. Attendees will leave the session with practical tips to jump start their own program.

Speakers
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Beth McGough

Social Media Manager, ProQuest
Beth McGough is the Social Media Manager for ProQuest. Beth McGough joined ProQuest as a Library Holdings Consultant with the UMI microform sales group, and has held various positions in Product Management and Marketing. Her service to the library community has included working on committees with the Michigan Library Association, American Library Association, and NASIG. She has also consulted on library projects and public affairs for a large... Read More →
avatar for Danielle Salomon

Danielle Salomon

Teaching and Learning Services Librarian and Social Media Manager, UCLA
Danielle Salomon is Teaching and Learning Services Librarian and Social Media Manager in Powell Library at the University of California, Los Angeles. In her role as Teaching and Learning Services Librarian, she works with undergraduate courses to design and implement course-integrated instruction on research tools and databases. In her role as Social Media Manger, she oversees the strategy and management of the UCLA Powell Library social media... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

From Crisis to Opportunity: A Licensing Audit How To
In June 2013, the University of British Columbia Library completed a 6-month project that involved the audit and analysis of over 700 licensing documents. Long overdue and the result of nearly a year of planning, the project brought about the successful implementation of an electronic resource management system, Serials Solutions 360 Resource Manager, and the reorganization of the UBC public-facing license permissions database.

This session follows the evolution of the project from its inception through to its conclusion, and emphasizes the influence of the changing copyright environment in Canada and institutional perceptions of risk, the importance of project management, data standards, and an iterative approach to what is a fundamentally complex process. Highlights of the session will include an overview of changes in licensing workflows and policies, distinctions between the resource manager and our public permissions database, the benefits of a full-scale reanalysis project, and methods for collaborating and communicating with stakeholders.

The objective of the session is to impart strategies for creating a sustainable licensing infrastructure for electronic resource management and communication of resource permissions and restrictions to faculty, staff, and students. This session is a must for library staff looking to implement or maximize the value of their ERM, and effectively manage permissions granted under their current licenses.

This session will include a brief survey of attendees on their licensing practices and the tools they employ, and will incorporate directed group discussion throughout the presentation. Attendees will leave with concrete examples of the key documents required to start similar projects of license analysis and organization.

Attendees can expect to learn how UBC uses Serials Solutions 360 Resource Manager alongside an in-house public permissions database, and how our approach to planning and executing the reanalysis project has created an adaptable and forward-thinking practice for license management.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Henderson

Laurie Henderson

Licensing Specialist, University of British Columbia Library
I work and live in Vancouver, British Columbia. For the past year, I have had the good fortune to be a licensing specialist in the e-Resources unit of Central Technical Services at UBC Library. | | I am passionate about access to collections for all user groups, but particularly for our community, alumni, and walk-in patrons. One of the challenges of collection building is broadening the circle that can effectively access our ever richer... Read More →
avatar for Max King

Max King

Licensing Specialist, University of British Columbia
Hi, | | I work at The University of British Columbia in the e-resources department and specialize in licensing. I am passionate about issues in intellectual property and copyright law, in particular the recent developments in Canadian copyright law. | | I'm also a big sports fan and of course love the Vancouver Canucks hockey team.
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Teresa Lee

E-Resource & Access Librarian, University of British Columbia
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Danielle W. Westbrook

Shared Print Collections Analyst, California Digital Library
Danielle Westbrook is the Shared Print Collections Analyst at the California Digital Library. Her professional interests are electronic and print collection management, user outcomes and visual analytics. She also enjoys cycling, ceramics and podcasts.


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Individual Article Purchase: Catching the Wave of the Future or Getting Pounded on the Reef

For many libraries, particularly small to midsize academic libraries, journals have placed significant strains on the acquisitions budget. For fiscal year 2012/2013 the Volpe library at Tennessee Tech University faced a significant materials budget shortfall. Rather than simply cutting titles to cover the shortfall or asking the administration for more money we concluded that the existing system of acquiring and delivering information packaged in journals was not sustainable for us. We therefore embarked on a yearlong process to develop a different way of providing article information that would more efficiently use the budget that we have. The process we have developed focuses more heavily on purchasing individual articles, using the CCC product Get it Now, in an attempt to maximize the impact of our budget resources.

This presentation will describe the process that was used to prepare a plan to meet the budget challenge. It will also include a description of the final plan, the implementation of the plan and early results that are available on the operation of the new process. 

There are two main objects for this session. First is to present a process we are implementing to meet a challenge many libraries face in the hope that it will be of value to our colleagues and that they can learn from our experience. Second is to solicit input and ideas that will improve the process. Those that attend the session can participate by sharing their reactions and ideas.


Speakers
avatar for Doug Bates

Doug Bates

Dean of the Library, Tennessee Tech University
Doug Bates is Dean of the Angelo and Jennette Volpe Library at Tennessee Tech University. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and his Ed.D at Kansas State University. He has worked previously as a Documents Reference Librarian at Texas Tech University, as Head of Government Documents and the Chair of Access Services at Kansas State University, and University Librarian at BYU-Hawaii. He has served as President... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Is ILL Enough? Examining ILL Demand After Journal Cancellations at Three North Carolina Universities
Interlibrary Loan has traditionally been offered as a substitute method of access for low use titles during cancellation projects. There has been little current research about the impact that cancellations actually has on Interlibrary Loan demand. Universities in North Carolina experienced severe budget reductions in 2011 – 2012, resulting in dramatic serials cancellations. This session will examine Interlibrary Loan demand for journal titles cancelled during budget reductions at three North Carolina schools since time of cancellation. We will also address factors that mitigate Interlibrary Loan demand including the diverse structure of cancellation projects at the different institutions. The panel will discuss implications of these data for future journal cancellation projects as well as implications for publishers, database providers, and the future of scholarly communication.

Speakers
avatar for Kristin Calvert

Kristin Calvert

Head of Content Organization & Management, Western Carolina University
Kristin Calvert is Head of Content Organization & Management at Western Carolina University and previously the Electronic Resources Librarian. Prior to coming to North Carolina she was Head of Periodicals at Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. She also has worked at YBP Library Services, and the University of California’s Northern Regional Library Facility. She holds a BA in political science from the University of California, Berkeley... Read More →
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Rachel Fleming

Serials Librarian, Western Carolina University
Rachel Fleming is Serials Librarian at Western Carolina University. Previously she was Collection Development librarian at Central College in Pella, Iowa. Rachel has overseen several serials cancellation projects. She holds an MA in library science from the University of Missouri – Columbia.
WG

William Gee

Head, Interlibrary Loan & Document Delivery, East Carolina University
avatar for Janet Malliett

Janet Malliett

Serials/Collection Development Librarian, Winston Salem State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

It Can Be Done! Planning and Process for Successful Collection Management Projects
W. Lee Hisle (slides)

Many academic libraries face the challenge of decreasing the size of print collections. This 2-part presentation offers perspectives on a range of activities for successful projects. Connecticut College will share the background and principles that guided its recent project, including the importance of administrative support, marketing of the project to the faculty, the role of data in that effort, the lessons learned from other institutions, and the key documents and tools developed to encourage faculty support of the project. In addition, assessment markers to judge progress and the importance of consultant assistance will be discussed. Wesleyan University will compare the key differences in their project’s objectives, principles and challenges with those of Connecticut College, and summarize the lessons drawn from their experience.

The second part of the presentation will focus on organizational challenges and workflow changes in Technical Services as libraries engage in large and collaborative weeding and retention projects. Libraries at nine state-supported Michigan universities are working collaboratively to identify and manage a shared collection of widely held low-use monograph titles. The Michigan Shared Print Initiative (MI-SPI) distributes retention responsibility for each title to two libraries in the group, allowing others to choose to remove them. Ferris State University will share details about a comprehensive weeding project that included applying additional rules to the weeding lists, documenting decisions to keep titles, and developing processes and workflows. Central Michigan University will share new workflows that take into account retention responsibilities and discuss the development of a tool that facilitates communication among participating libraries about volumes that are missing or in poor condition. This broadly focused session will help attendees gain valuable insights about how to best carry out weeding and retention projects.

Speakers
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Pamela Grudzien

Director of Acquisitions, Metadata & Resource Sharing Services, Central Michigan University
Pamela has many years of library experience in public services, collection development, resource sharing, and more recently, technical services.  This varied experience has provided her with a well-rounded perspective of academic library services, challenges, and opportunities. Her latest projects include a Technical Services workflow analysis and reorganization plan as well as involvement in the statewide shared print project called MI... Read More →
avatar for W. Lee Hisle

W. Lee Hisle

VP for Information Services and Librarian of the College, Connecticut College
As CIO, I oversee all libraries, instructional technology, administrative systems, networks, and telecommunications at Connecticut College. Past professional activities include service as Chair of the Board of Trustees of LYRASIS, President of the Association of College and Research Libraries, and Chair of the ALA Nominating Committee. Recent presentations made at the Charleston Conference, EDUCAUSE, NERCOMP, the Consortium of Liberal Arts... Read More →
avatar for Frances Rosen

Frances Rosen

Collection Development and Acquisitions Librarian, Ferris State University Library FLITE
I'm interested in collections and acquisitions, information literacy for engineering and technology students, competency-based general education, inclusion & diversity, MOOCs, and baseball. (Wait til next year!)
avatar for Patricia Tully

Patricia Tully

University Librarian, Weslyan University


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

It’s Not Just a Document: Using Government Data in Teaching and Research
Government documents have long been perceived as valuable resources containing unique information content. But documents are also sources of deep, rich data that’s available nowhere else. Identifying the specific sources that contain this data, tapping it, and manipulating it can be confusing at best. But once discovered, these data sets are difficult if not impossible for scholars and general information seekers to do without.

This session will discuss the importance of mining the data found in government publications collections to support the teaching and research enterprise. The panel of presenters—comprised of a content developer, manager, mediator, and user—will suggest ways to derive greater value from government information resources, explore new ways of thinking about text and data patterns, and assess some of the challenges and opportunities facing faculty, researchers, and library and information professionals as the expectations and possibilities regarding use of such digital content changes. Because partnering across their respective areas is important for the delivery of quality information services that support making this data available, they will also share their perspectives on the importance of their collaborations for the benefit of their stakeholder groups. Finally, they will outline strategies for maximizing use of government information as the ultimate Big Data and invite attendees to share their own experiences, both the successful and the frustrating, of using these complex information resources in their own libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Johnson

Catherine Johnson

Product Manager-Lead, ProQuest
As Product Manager Lead at ProQuest, Catherine Johnson is responsible for ProQuest Congressional products. Catherine brings expertise and industry knowledge to her current role at ProQuest as the former Director of Market Planning for academic market legislative and historic services at LexisNexis. Catherine’s 34 years of experience in government information began at the start of her career working on CIS/Index in the editorial department... Read More →
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Melissa Oakes

Sales Manager, ProQuest
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Marianne Ryan

Associate University Librarian, User Strategies, Northwestern University Libraries
avatar for Diane H. Smith

Diane H. Smith

Associate University Librarian, Research and Education Services, George Mason University
Diane is currently the Associate Librarian for Research and Educational Services at George Mason University. Prior to that she was the VP for Product Management in the Government Information group of ProQuest as well as the VP for Product Development in the academic facing portion of LexisNexis. She spent 18 years working in a variety of roles at the Penn State University Libraries. She is passionate about government information and public... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Library Value in the Developing World
This presentation will introduce the findings of a SAGE research study conducted in 2013 to investigate library value in the developing world. The project, 'Library Value in the Developing World' investigates the value of academic libraries for teaching and research staff at 12 institutions selected from countries classified by the World Bank as low income and middle income economies (i.e. with a GNI less than $4035). The project findings explore evidence and perception of value, evidence and perception of library services, and evidence and perception of communication between library and academic departments. ‘Library Value’ also includes a marketing case study which examines the effectiveness of marketing techniques to drive awareness, usage, and perception of the services and support libraries offer their academics in teaching and research roles.

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Leonard

Elisabeth Leonard

Senior Field Editor, SAGE Publications


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Magic of (A)ffective Management
Effective management can be one of the most challenging issues facing any library professional. Managing even a small group of professionals, para-professionals and/or student employees can be a mine field of complex interpersonal interactions and time consuming effort. This session is designed to give the attendee insight into management practices that have proven effect, some theoretical musings of the presenter on why these practices have proven effective in a variety of settings and practical hints, information and strategies that the attendees will be able to take home and implement immediately.

Speakers
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Ryan Weir

Electronic Resources Librarian, Indiana State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Marketing Academic Library Resources: The Good, The Bad and The Future

What are academic libraries really doing to market the library resources they have? This joint presentation will take a look at what academic libraries are doing today to promote their resources and themselves. Carol Anne Germain, Information Literacy Librarian at the University at Albany and the current president of the New York Library Association, will discuss how librarians can develop, implement, and successfully evaluate marketing plans for e-resources. Nader Qaimari, Senior Vice President of Marketing for Gale, will delve deep into the implications of how libraries can solicit, create and present impactful stories of student success using data gathered from recent studies by Gale, part of Cengage Learning, which explore the tactics librarians employ to market their e-resources and how they really feel about their measurement and effectiveness or non-effectiveness.  Participation will be encouraged with the audience on the topics of assessment, budgeting and goal setting along with what vendors can be doing better for support and services surrounding library investments. 

Attendees will walk away with an understanding of how to develop, implement and evaluate marketing plans for e-resources that work for their individual needs, while also building basic visibility within the community they serve. Attendees will also learn how to better connect with their students and faculty and gather and share their successes with influential members of the community.


Speakers
CA

Carol Anne Germain

Information Literacy Librarian, University of Albany
Carol Anne is an Information Literacy Librarian at the University at Albany where she teaches information literacy courses, participates in reference, and develops web-based instructional resources. She is also an adjunct in the College of Computing and Information. She is the current president of the New York Library Association and an active member of several professional library organizations including the State University of New York... Read More →
NQ

Nader Qaimari

Senior Vice President, Marketing, Gale, part of Cengage Learning


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Auditorium, Science and Mathematics Building 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Resolved: All Librarians should be Subject Librarians: Implementing Subject Librarianship across a Research Library
Many academic research librarians are specialists - catalogers, data curation librarians, electronic resources librarians – and working with students is considered to be a job for public service librarians. The University of Tennessee Libraries is expanding subject librarian responsibility across the Libraries, and research librarians who may have never worked in public services are assuming liaison and collection development roles. Steve Smith, Dean of Libraries, will share his model of “learning, research, and collections (LRC)” librarianship and explain his rationale for starting the UTK Libraries down this road. And how’s that concept working for us? Hear from two of the librarians charged with implementing the vision: a technical services librarian given a new LRC subject responsibility and the public service librarian assigned to bring the new LRC subject librarian up to speed. We will discuss organizational and implementation challenges and share what we’ve learned about training and mentoring new subject librarians.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Smith

Steve Smith

Dean of Libraries, University of Tennessee
DT

Deborah Thomas

Research Collections Librarian, University of Tennessee
Deb Thomas has worked in both academic public and technical services.  She currently works on projects where collection development and technical services intersect.
avatar for Alan Wallace

Alan Wallace

Learning, Research and Collections Librarian, University of Tennessee Libraries


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Shotgun Sessions
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have approximately 10 minutes at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all 5 sessions. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) No Experience Necessary: A Crash Course in Developing Approval Plans
Whitney Kemble, University of Toronto

Whitney Kemble (slides)

This presentation will detail the basics of developing an approval plan for first-timers. Using as a case study the experience of a small academic library that established an approval plan with over twenty profiles to launch with its new liaison librarian program, the session will explore the planning, development, and implementation of an approval plan, with all of its ups and downs. Although the librarians involved in the project were inexperienced, the transition has proven successful, and the profiles continue to evolve.

This session is geared toward librarians who do not currently use approval plans but are interested in learning more about their development. It will touch upon what goes into approval plans, how they function, working with vendors, collections data analysis, budgeting issues, acquisitions workflow, assessment, etc. Attendees will learn about what pitfalls to avoid and what steps to take toward developing and implementing an effective approval plan.

2) Redesigning Workflows and Implementing Demand Driven Acquisitions at Virginia Tech
Connie Stovall, Virginia Tech


Collection Management has become increasingly complex. Library budgets are often stagnating, staff time is being redirected towards other needs, and demand for online resources is seemingly insatiable. These realities were part of the impetus behind Virginia Tech Libraries’ decision to begin a one-year Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) pilot program.

Virginia Tech implemented a multi-vendor DDA option with YBP Library Services in late 2012. This presentation will provide an overview of the implementation process challenges, and will detail the collection opportunities and financial benefits gained. Our goal is to provide participants with information to assist with their implementation of DDA.

In our study we compared cost and usage data from our 2010 and 2011 approvals and firm orders, COUNTER BR1 reports, and other vendor-provided data. In doing so, we were able to determine cost benefits and identify usage patterns. We will discuss our underlying assumptions regarding patron purchases and share our pilot findings, along with our analysis strategies. Our presentation will also address the issues of duplication, and solutions in effectively receiving eBook titles from our primary aggregators EBL, ebrary, and EBSCOhost. 

The implementation and integration of DDA was not a simple, one-step process.  We continue to assess our workflow to meet the challenges of integrating DDA with our discovery layer Summon, managing cost, and addressing access problems.

3) 120 to 12: reducing days to shelf with vendor services, cat-on-receipt and automated bib overlay
Sherle Abramson-Bluhm, University of Michigan

(slides)

The University of Michigan Technical Services underwent a major re-organization in 2007, combining the Serials & Acquisitions Division with the Cataloging Division which led to a substantial reduction in time-to-shelf and reallocated resources for the increasing electronic assets and long neglected special projects.  This presentation will detail the changes made in staffing configurations and responsibilities as well as adjustments in workflow. It also describes the U of M experience with vendor services such as use of vendor records for a modified EDI ordering process and utilizing shelf-ready processing. To speed materials to the shelf, new print acquisitions were mainstreamed and cataloging on receipt was implemented for materials with bibliographic copy. A procedure to flag records needing further work was developed and implemented with the collaboration of the library systems staff.   These flagged records were then searched online monthly via an automated process using defined matching points to find and accept a fuller record for overlay.  Only those materials for which a better record was not found, would be reviewed for further cataloging which might be required. In this re-organization, some staff members were reassigned to areas in Electronic Resources and Access, while experienced and rare book catalogers could focus on un-cataloged materials in Special Collections such as Transportation History and Rare books; as well as significant gifts including a 20,00 item collection of Sheet Music and The Walp Collection of Children’s Literature.  The presentation will relate successes and lessons learned and illustrate the benefits to library patrons.

4) A Demand-Driven-Preferred Approval Plan
Ann Roll, California State University, Fullerton

Ann Roll (slides)

California State University, Fullerton’s Pollak Library is working toward the goal of providing as much content in electronic format as possible. To address this need along with a shrinking budget for monographs, the Library recently moved to not only an e-preferred approval plan, but actually a demand-driven-preferred approval plan. Pollak Library had a successful DDA plan in place for some time, in which slipped approval plan titles were automatically added to the Library catalog and made available for short-term-loan via DDA. With some slight workflow adjustments, approval plan titles that were sent automatically as books, rather than slips, are also being made available for short-term-loan via DDA rather than being purchased automatically.

This presentation will discuss the Library’s transition to a DDA-preferred approval plan and its effects on budget and collecting. Attendees can expect to learn the pros and cons of this approach. While librarian attendees can discuss how to implement a DDA-preferred approval plan in their own libraries, vendor and publisher attendees can discuss ways of streamlining this process.

5) Approval Plan Assessment: A Collection Management Initiative 
Chris Palazzolo, Emory University


Contemporary collection management often heralds the decline of print collections.  However, at Woodruff Library (Emory University), we continue to build significant physical collections to meet the curricular and research needs of our students and faculty.   We have recently begun to expand our approval plans to allow for the purchase and acquisition of e-titles.   With this growth (and demand for space) has come the need for assessment of these collections. As one method of assessing the use of Woodruff Library’s monograph collection, we have decided to examine the number of loans for print and e-books (short-term loans and title requests in this case) across all subject areas during a three-year period to identify the subject areas of books (as well as publishers and series) that were loaned most or least frequently. Analyses were performed for both approval plan purchases (e and print) and firm orders from Yankee Book Peddler. By matching up circulation data with publisher and series information for each book title, we have been able to progressively narrow our analyses and ultimately reveal specific subject areas and publishers for which future purchasing decisions could potentially be modified. We plan to present the results of our analysis, discuss the strengths and weaknesses of this approach, and consider how variations in the patterns of use across different subject areas might impact collection development decisions.  We hope that session participants will learn from our methodology and offer relevant commentary and suggestions for refinement and future research.  The session should be interactive, and allow for ample participation.

Speakers
SA

Sherle Abramson-Bluhm

Head, Print Acquisitions, University of Michigan
WK

Whitney Kemble

Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Scarborough Library
CP

Chris Palazzolo

Head of Collection Management and Social Sciences Librarian, Emory University Libraries
avatar for Ann Roll

Ann Roll

Interim Head, Collection and Processing Services, California State University, Fullerton
CS

Connie Stovall

Assistant Director for Collection Management, Virginia Tech
When I can't be outdoors hiking or running, I work with data, data, and more data. I work with my team to assess collection needs to support changing research priorities and areas of strategic emphasis for the university. We prepare and analyze report, usage statistics, or other information to assess effectiveness of library resources and determine strengths and weaknesses of the collections.


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

The Women's Library Moves: Deeds not Words
The move of the Women's Library (TWL), Europe's most important collection on the history of women is an ongoing project for the Library of the London School of Economics (LSE). Building LSE academic and financial support and withstanding public protest while prompting political support the collection moved summer 2013. Managing building works, staff transfers and more the project has revealed the riches of this UNESCO listed collection of Women's History. Housed alongside LSE's existing campaigning and historical collections it enables a rich resource for students, researchers and the public. Lessons learned from the project will be combined with illustrations from the collections and should interest those who work in Archives, Special Collections, Fundraising and Development, Library building design and management, digital library offerings, publishing and discovery, outreach, exhibitions and teaching. For those with an interest in women's history individual stories will be revealed as the next part of the project gets underway to develop the new home for TWL@LSE.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth (Liz) Chapman

Elizabeth (Liz) Chapman

Director of Library Services, BLPES, London School of Economics and Political Science
Liz has been Director of Library Services at LSE since January 2010 and in 2012 she led the successful bid for the transfer of the Women's Library collection to LSE. LSE Library has recently incorporated responsibility for LSE publishing, and has a pioneering Digital Library. A graduate of Durham University she has worked at Brunel, Oxford and University College London Libraries in a variety of roles, stepping out of Libraries for one year in... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Who are the Winners? E-books Consortial Purchasing
Over the last year, JISC Collections has undertaken a project, managed by Information Power, to see if there is an effective way to purchase e-books on a title by title basis with a collaborative group of academic libraries. The aim of the project is to explore if all books receive sufficient use to provide value-for-money for libraries; how such an initiative could be equitably funded by libraries; how much would publishers charge; what benefits there would be for participating publishers; and how it would be managed.

Previous consortial e-books projects have been undertaken in Germany and Spain, but no analysis was done of usage, cost per use and value. The JISC project includes 5 libraries and 6 publishers, and focuses on e-books in engineering. Usage data and cost data have been collected and analysis is currently in progress.

Interim results of the project are showing considerable savings for libraries and excellent cost-per use. By November there will be a full analysis of all the cost and usage data, with detailed breakdowns of use by subject, publisher and institution. Find out who are the winners (and losers?) at this year’s conference.

Speakers
HH

Helen Henderson

Managing Director, Information Power Ltd
avatar for Hazel Woodward

Hazel Woodward

Director, Information Power Ltd
Having worked in academic libraries for the majority of my career, I am passionate about e-content and digital library innovation. I have undertaken research on areas of scholarly communication and published many articles and books. My current passion is for our company Information Power, which works with publishers, intermediaries and libraries in this exciting area.


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

“Access vs. Ownership” Revisited: Quinnipiac University Libraries’ STL Program with eBooks
Challenged by a historically small monographs collection, a considerable growth in the number of students and academic programs, and faced with space limitations in the stacks, Quinnipiac University librarians began their large scale investment in eBooks in January 2011. Initially, we subscribed to Ebrary’s Academic Complete collection. That same year, we began a conversation with EBL and its then VP of Sales Dr. David Swords. It was our desire to compare a subscription approach with a patron-driven acquisitions strategy as we further examined the place of eBooks in our libraries. Initially, in 2012, we offered EBL titles published from 2010—2012. Yet questions remained around the purchase of eBooks EVEN when our patrons used EBL titles. An eBook, used but once or twice took up no shelf space, but it represented a purchase – funds spent. In ownership, it also represented a unit that required care, feeding, and quite possibly weeding. Discussions with our colleagues at Fairfield University about their STL (short-term loan) strategy intrigued us, and we are indebted to them for sharing data, observations, and issues encountered. In October 2012, Quinnipiac’s Arnold Bernhard Library expanded its own STL initiative, making available the entire EBL catalog and adhering almost completely to STL activity. That is, we bought almost no eBooks but made more than 300,000 academic titles available to our patrons. Charles Getchell, former Director of the Bernhard Library, Quinnipiac; June DeGennaro, Collection Management Librarian, Quinnipiac; and David Swords, EBL-Ebook Library/ProQuest will share with you key elements of the planning, implementation, and outcome assessment of this full-fledged STL program at Quinnipiac University. Surprises, discoveries, and future plans will be shared as well. We remain intrigued, as at present, only three known academic libraries in North America have this valuable access strategy in place.

Speakers
avatar for June DeGennaro

June DeGennaro

Collection Management Librarian, Quinnipiac University
A Catholic University of America MLS graduate and a librarian for over 30 years, June is currently part of the Technical Services team at Quinnipiac University. Her responsibilities include acquisitions, serials, licensing and statistical gathering for the library’s print and electronic resources. She lives in West Haven, Connecticut.
avatar for Charles Getchell

Charles Getchell

College Librarian, Saint Anselm College
Charles Getchell became College Librarian at Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH in May 2013. Previously, he was College Librarian and then Director of the Arnold Bernhard Library at Quinnipiac University 1995 – 2013. His primary interests and background are in collection development and information literacy. He enjoys library construction and renovation projects, and he serves on accreditation team for the New England Association of... Read More →
DS

David Swords

Director of Consortium Sales, ProQuest
David Swords is Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Ebook Library and has worked with academic and special libraries for 15 years.  He is the editor of Patron-Driven Acquisitions:  History and Best Practices, published by Walter DeGruyter in late 2011.  Swords has a Ph.D. and taught for 12 years at the University of  New Orleans.  He lives in New Hampshire.


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

A Reading of The New Digital Age, by Schmidt and Cohen
The Internet arguably represents one of the best examples of human creativity, energy, and expression. It is fast, ubiquitous, affordable and promising. Its versatility offers effective connectivity via wireless networks, to billions of people worldwide. Schmidt and Jared argue that in spite of the speed and power of these new  digital technologies,  global connectivity poses certain challenges, among which are, the absence of "terrestrial laws in this ungoverned space", the need to understand this shifting Internet construct, the threat of digital empowerment and their implications for authoritarian governments, citizens, and institutions. This paper will examine the above-mentioned ideas and their implications for academic libraries in "Reshaping the Future of People, Nations, and Business," by Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen.

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Coordinator/Librarian of Collection Development, De Pauw University Libraries
Joyce is an academic librarian (Professor) and Coordinator of Collection Development at DPU, where she has worked for many years. She earned both PhD (French Literature)and MLS degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Her primary services include assessing and selecting subject collections, crafting and revising policies for the development and management of resources for subject holdings. Her wide-ranging scholarly interests include... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Parkview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Between Two Nerds: Marketing Asks the Techies to Explain Stuff. Very Slowly.
This session will explore how several thousand eBooks per year are handled on the back-end, in terms of production and metadata. The information will be presented from a technical perspective but moderated for a general audience, in an interview format.

Topics covered will include managing the production pipeline, distributing content internally and externally, quality assurance, metadata for libraries and retailers, and handling corrections. These are everyday workflow and policy matters made more challenging, interesting and topical due to the scale of the publishing program and the global network of employees involved.

The speakers will welcome questions and perspectives from our publishing, vendor and librarian colleagues throughout the session.

Moderators
JK

Jennifer Kemp

eProduct Manager, eBooks, Springer
Jennifer Kemp is Product Manager of eBooks at Springer in New York. Prior to joining Springer, she was a Publication Manager at Stanford University’s HighWire Press. Jennifer started her career as a librarian at IBM, where she spent several years in a variety of roles at the Watson and Almaden Research Centers.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Brown

Alexander Brown

Corporate Communications Manager, Springer
Alex started with Springer in January 2012 and established the company’s first corporate communications/press office in the Americas, where he works to support various businesses through a mix of public relations, special projects and internal communications. Prior to Springer Alex worked at New York Blood Center, home to more than 20 research laboratories and the National Cord Blood Program.  There Alex helped lead a team... Read More →
avatar for Ladd Brown

Ladd Brown

Head of Acquisitions, Virginia Tech
A lot of things have changed in the thirty-odd years Ladd has been in the library biz. Not being able to smoke at your desk in Tech Services anymore is one of the biggies.
avatar for Meghan Dowell

Meghan Dowell

Discovery Services Liaison & Manager Sales Operations, Americas, Springer
Meghan completed her MLIS from Long Island University in 2012. She is currently working at Springer as the Discovery Services Liaison and Sales Operations Manager for the Americas. When not traveling or teaching her cats to play fetch, Meghan moonlights as a reference librarian at New York University, volunteering for the UNI project and teaching information literacy.
HK

Henry Krell

Vice President, Production U.S., Springer


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Collective Collection Development and DDA
Many librarians have advocated for the use of DDA as an important money saving approach in a time of reduced resources that targets acquisitions we know will be used. In addition to saving money, the introduction of e-DDA presents an opportunity for a consortium to achieve three collection development objectives: continue to make the core publisher output available - and even more quickly and easily available; free up more of the collections budget to purchase unique content for the system across the campuses, not just at the larger schools; and allow campuses to review user activity to make systemwide, long-term decisions about user behavior and content not acquired through DDA. DDA can enable the consortium to meet the needs of the many right now as well as to continue to build some collections of depth for the system as a whole and the scholarly community writ large.

Participants will hear from three University of California campuses: large, small and smaller and learn about their experiences with using DDA in collective collection building and their hopes for its potential for their local and systemwide collections.

Speakers
JD

Jim Dooley

Head, Collection Services, University of California, Merced
Jim Dooley has been head of collections and technical services at the University of California, Merced since 2003.  Prior to coming to UC Merced he held a variety of positions in technical services and special collections at the University of Utah.  He serves on various University of California systemwide committees including collections licensing, shared print and cataloging and metadata services.  He has presented at previous... Read More →
MH

Martha Hruska

Associate University Librarian, Collection Services, University of California, San Diego


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 138, Science and Mathematics Building 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Cost-Per-Use and the Big Deal: The Right Metric for Cancellation Decisions?
The Carolina Consortium enables academic libraries in North and South Carolina to use their bulk purchasing power to obtain favorable pricing on a variety of electronic resources. In 2013 the Carolina Consortium (CC) included roughly 150 community colleges, public universities, and private institutions of higher learning. Started at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), the CC has no formal structure and requires no membership fees. Librarians at UNCG handle the majority of negotiations with publishers and vendors and serve as a resource for libraries throughout the Carolinas. Through the consortium, members realize a collective cost avoidance of approximately 240 million dollars each year.
Despite these significant savings, we believe it is imperative to assess our deals for our members. For the past two years, we have collected cost-per-use statistics on several big journal packages for institutions in the CC with an aim of better understanding the value institutions derive from these deals and to evaluate how well these deals serve the many different types of colleges and universities within the consortium. UNCG and several other CC members have used this cost-per-use data as a metric for determining whether to cancel or renew big deals. In this presentation, we will discuss trends we uncovered through our CPU analysis. We also explore what is behind the numbers and how our members balanced the CPU data with other factors in their decision making.
In discussion, we hope to gather information from the attendees about their own CPU data. Through this presentation, attendees will be able to place their usage statistics in a broader context and will take away tools for evaluating the value of their Big Deal packages.

Speakers
TB

Tim Bucknall

Assistant Dean of University Libraries, and Head of Electronic Resources and Information Technologies, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Tim is founder and convener of the Carolina Consortium, and an inventor of Journal Finder, the first Open URL link resolver. He was recently named the 2014 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year.
KL

Kimberly Lutz

Associate Director of Marketing, ITHAKA


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Emerging Industry Standards: A Primer
This session will investigate several important new technical standards that are emerging from the publishing community. In non-technical presentations, experts representing these initiatives will discuss their progress, as well as the potential impact these standards will have on scholarly communication. Presenters will include representatives from the NISO group developing a metadata indicator for open access articles, the FundRef funder identification service exploring a standard way to report funding sources for published scholarly research, and ORCID, the registry of unique researcher identifiers.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Bryant

Rebecca Bryant

Director of Community, ORCID
avatar for Chris Shillum

Chris Shillum

Vice President, Platform and Data Integration, Elsevier
Chris Shillum is currently Vice President of Platform and Data Integration for Elsevier, where he is focusing on integrating data resources across silos to enable the next generation of personalized services for researchers and building out Elsevier’s big data platform. Previously, he was responsible for the platform and systems which power online products such as ScienceDirect and Scopus. He has worked in various capacities on Elsevier’s... Read More →
avatar for Greg Tananbaum

Greg Tananbaum

Owner, ScholarNext Consulting
Greg Tananbaum serves as a consultant to publishers, libraries, universities, and information providers as owner of ScholarNext (www.scholarnext.com). ScholarNext clients include Facebook, Microsoft, SPARC, Meta, and Annual Reviews.  He has been President of The Berkeley Electronic Press, as well as Director of Product Marketing for EndNote. Greg writes a regular column in Against the Grain covering emerging developments in the field of... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

From Spreadsheets to SUSHI: Five Years of Assessing Use of E-Resources

This session details five years of gathering and analyzing e-resource usage statistics for Appalachian State University and Western Carolina University. Presented with the challenge of gathering and analyzing e-resource usage statistics, something akin to a jigsaw puzzle that required assembling numerous small, often oddly shaped, interlocking, and tessellating pieces that rarely fit together, the first challenge was methodology.  Excel spreadsheets were employed to manage the discovery and compilation of hundreds of URL’s, logins and passwords.

Plunging into this brave new world of standards and protocols required understanding how each vendor reported their usage statistics. Some offered COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of NeTworked Electronic Resources) reports while others had their own system of reporting.

When the initial puzzle was complete, the fun was over and gathering stats manually became tedious and monotonous.  Looking for a way to automate the process we were thrilled to learn of SUSHI (Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative), a new initiative for harvesting the data automatically, and began to explore how to implement this new protocol.  Soon it was apparent we did not have the technical support or server capability to proceed with the project on our own.

Both universities now have Ebsco’s Usage Consolidation product. ASU is just beginning but WCU now has 6 months of experience with the product. Kristin will share details of WCU’s implementation.

We intend for this case study to stimulate further discussion and research on alternative options and extensions of a collaborative model for gathering and analyzing usage statistics in other institutions or contexts.


Speakers
avatar for Kristin Calvert

Kristin Calvert

Head of Content Organization & Management, Western Carolina University
Kristin Calvert is Head of Content Organization & Management at Western Carolina University and previously the Electronic Resources Librarian. Prior to coming to North Carolina she was Head of Periodicals at Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. She also has worked at YBP Library Services, and the University of California’s Northern Regional Library Facility. She holds a BA in political science from the University of California, Berkeley... Read More →
avatar for Leslie Farison

Leslie Farison

Collection Management Services:Business Librarian, Appalachian State University
Leslie Farison is the Business Subject Librarian in Collection Management Services and an Assistant Professor at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. She received her MLIS from the University of Kentucky and her MBA from Indiana University. Prior to becoming a librarian, Leslie spent many years as a Marketing executive in the corporate arena. She has written book chapters for titles from ALA, Salem Press and IGI Global and... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

How Libraries Use Publisher Metadata
Library cataloging departments can no longer keep up with the deluge of electronic publishing content and must rely on publisher-provided metadata to support access to this content. This session will provide an overview of how library catalogs, link resolvers and discovery systems work and will present case studies of how publisher metadata embedded in these systems supports the discovery experience for academic library users. Examples from several publishers will be highlighted to illustrate different approaches that publishers can take in providing metadata to libraries and library service providers. Attendees will also learn about existing metadata standards that address metadata quality and formats.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Shadle

Steven Shadle

Serials Access Librarian, University of Washington Libraries
As a librarian, Steve connects users to content. His primary responsibility at the University of Washington Libraries is to manage the library linking systems that provide access to journal full-text. In addition, he catalogs eSerials selected and licensed by the UW Libraries. Steve’s background in serial standards began with his work as an ISSN Cataloger at the Library of Congress and currently includes serving on the NISO working group... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Measuring Research Impact on the Web

Beth Bernhardt (slides)
Iain Hrynaszkiewicz (slides)

How do you measure the impact of research? Do you know Impact Factor from ImpactStory; or F1000Prime score from Altmetric score? Understanding the how research impact is measured is very important for funders, institutions and individuals. Traditional metrics have focused on citations of papers and journals but there is growing realisation – highlighted in 2013 by the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) – that the Impact Factor is inappropriate for assessing individual papers, institutions, and individual researchers. The internet has given us a wealth of new data on how much published papers (and other products of research) are read, reused and revered by the authors’ peers.  Alternative (“alt”) metrics can measure how many times a paper is downloaded, tweeted, or shared on social media; how many bloggers have written about it; how many readers a paper has on social reference managers such as Mendeley. These interactions are possible to track, aggregate and measure and, to some extent, be understood. And F1000Prime aims to provide context to altmetrics with human-readable comments along with numerical article scores.

Altmetrics tools can be used by librarians to assess the impact of institutions’ research and to give a better indication, than the Impact Factor alone, of which journals are publishing the best research. With the rise of remote digital access to libraries, librarians should embrace altmetrics as an educational service to researchers who may now rarely need to visit the library in person, as well as for research assessment. This session will also discuss limitations and benefits of Impact Factors and alternative metrics and how some of the most important research impacts are currently immeasurable.  Using a case study from a librarian "in the trenches," the value of altmetrics tools for universities and funding agencies will also be considered.


Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collections and Scholarly Communications, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Libraries
Beth Bernhardt is the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  She has her graduate degree in Library Science from the University of South Carolina.  Beth has over twenty years of experience working in academic libraries, fourteen of those years specializing in electronic resources. She serves on the Carolina Consortium team that works with... Read More →
avatar for Iain Hrynaszkiewicz

Iain Hrynaszkiewicz

Outreach Director, Faculty of 1000
Iain Hrynaszkiewicz (otherwise known as Iain H) joined Faculty of 1000 in 2013 as Outreach Director, where he leads initiatives to engage with and educate users of F1000’s services for life scientists and clinicians. This includes external communications, product development and partnership building to increase usage and grow the F1000 community. Iain is passionate about using the Web to make it easier to share and assess science, and in... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Modeling a Shared National Cross Digital Repository
The White House directive on public access to federally funded research and data has generated unprecedented interest in building a system of cross-institutional digital repositories. Provosts and presidents recognizing the importance of participating in something like a SHared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE) are turning to their library directors for answers. This session will present, the Digital Commons Network, as possible model of federated yet independent repositories. We will show that already, with only 280 universities and colleges participating, a cross-institutional repository is achievable and to good effect. Come explore how this networked approach might be generalized to incorporate a range of repository platforms to create a National Cross Digital Repository.

Speakers
avatar for Jean-Gabriel Bankier

Jean-Gabriel Bankier

President and CEO, bepress
IR success metrics and bench marking | Faculty profiles | Author readership dashboards


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Non-English E-books. Really??
When it comes to foreign language materials, the path from print to electronic resources is as complex from the perspective of vendors as it is for the libraries they serve. Today, despite the digital revolution’s potential to bridge the divides of geography and culture, scholarly publishers overseas remain wary.

Three leading suppliers of vernacular language content — Casalini Libri, Harrassowitz, and East View — will address the unique challenges and specific issues facing academic libraries in North America that acquire, process and deliver non-English language content to patrons. Learn how eBook design from concept to delivery took a different approach for each of these three for scholarly content published in German, Italian, Russian and Chinese.

Speakers
AC

Angela Carreño

Head of Collection Development, Bobst Library, New York University
Angela M. Carreño is the Head of Collection Development for the Division of Libraries at New York University. Angela has led, coordinated and supported the expansive growth of licensed electronic resources at NYU since 2000. She is the primary licensing officer for the Division of Libraries and assumes primary responsibility for consortial collection development commitments. She represents the Libraries on collaborative projects with other... Read More →
avatar for Michele Casalini

Michele Casalini

CEO, Casalini Libri
Michele Casalini is CEO of the family-run company Casalini Libri, which supplies bibliographical data, books and journals to libraries, and offers e-content through the Torrossa platform, thanks to its dedicated Digital Division. | Following studies in Modern Languages and Literature at the University of Florence, and a period working with the publishing company La Nuova Italia, Michele specialised in the field of Information Technology and... Read More →
ZS

Zina Somova

Director of Operations, EastView Information Services
Databases, books and serials in print and e-formats from countries of the former Soviet Union (Russia, Ukraine, etc.), Eastern Europe, East Asia (China, Korea, etc. and Middle East. Foreign language materials in all formats.
FW

Friedemann Weigel

Managing Partner - Director Sales, HARRASSOWITZ


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Rebranding the Library: Generating Visibility in the Virtual Age
When library patrons find scholarly material, they typically link directly to the full text, bypassing any page that would draw attention to their library’s involvement. The library becomes an invisible facilitator. While all libraries and librarians consider themselves to be agents of knowledge, most are not ready to see their role in knowledge dissemination and access become entirely anonymous. As a result of not being recognized for providing these core services, many libraries risk having their funding impacted.

Libraries fulfill a crucial role in building and maintaining collections for their users and facilitating access to materials’ full text. However, they need to find new ways to brand themselves as a space that exists virtually as well as physically and to use their renewed visibility to ensure their place as a critical part of the knowledge building process.

Expanding on my article, “Provision Recognition: Increasing Awareness of the Library’s Value in Delivering Electronic Information Resources,” published in the Journal of Library Administration, we suggest several ways of rebranding the library and increasing its visibility. We encourage the audience to share their own “invisibility” challenges and ways in which they have addressed them.

Frumkin, J., & Reese, T. (2011). Provision Recognition: Increasing Awareness of the Library’s Value in Delivering Electronic Information Resources. Journal of Libray Administration, 51, 810-819. doi:10.1080/01930826.2011.601277

Speakers
JF

Jeremy Frumkin

Assistant Dean for Technology Strategy, University of Arizona
RK

Rachel Kessler

Product Manager, Primo Central, Ex Libris Ltd.


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Rethinking Collection Development: Selecting More with Less
This presentation will provide an exploration of the shifts in collection development practices at two universities. IUPUI’s new approach to collection development is a hybrid of the traditional just-in-case collection development. It includes a core approval plan for undergraduates, Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) for both print and electronic monographs which addresses user needs, and combined subscription and document delivery for journals. This three-pronged approach to collection development results in a collection that is more responsive to user needs and allows for the continued provision of required content for teaching and research. CSUN has also utilized the PDA model but is rethinking this approach to e-book collection development. Ultimately, the library is moving away from the PDA model to a subscription model in order to discover which titles should be added to the collection, which is a fundamental shift in collection development policy. The motivating factors behind this decision include: the variable content availability in different subject areas in the PDA model; the problems in managing the purchased and un-purchased titles; issues when running multiple PDA programs; poor discovery records; de-duping records for titles already owned; deposit funds for the pilot programs running out in the middle of the pilot.

The primary objective of the session is to explore the budgetary pressures on academic libraries and the innovative responses to those pressures. Attendees will be encouraged to share their own situations and their own innovative responses to their budget pressures. The attendees will learn various techniques for reviewing their own collection development processes. Additionally, they will be able to examine ways to identify both basic and hidden costs of traditional collection development.

Speakers
MM

MaryBeth Minick

Team Leader, PPT, IUPUI University Library
KP

Kevin Petsche

Head of Acquisitions, IUPUI University Library


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Smart Interfaces through Domain Knowledge: Facets, Metadata Displays, Analysis, Algorithms, and Paths to Knowledge

Facets and other metadata-based functionality used in library interfaces tend to be generic (subject, author, format/type, location, date, language, location), mimicking basic indices (such as the Z39.50 profiles and other catalogue-related standards). They provide a way to limit results and interact with content based on perceived similarities across grossly dissimilar content.

Library and library-related systems have tended to keep facets and metadata-based functionality generic in order to ensure applicability to as much content as possible in the results sets and item displays. In doing this are they truly serving the end user or deceiving them?

Facets and other metadata-driven functionality do not need to be generic. They can be smart. They can provide a way to analyze results and content and answer questions about results sets and the items within them. However, to be smart, the application of facets and metadata has to be smart... algorithimic, based on knowing what the probable domain of knowledge is and what the indexing specific to that domain can offer.

This session focuses on examples of how metadata-based functionality can provide a more focused and navigable experience for the end user, precisely because the experience is based on the user’s subject domain.


Speakers
SC

Sam Cook

Public Services Librarian, University of Hartford Libraries
avatar for Casey Mullin

Casey Mullin

Head, Data Control Unit, Stanford University Libraries
Casey is a metadata librarian and Head of the Data Control Unit of the Stanford University Libraries, where he previously served as humanities cataloger. He is active in the Music Library Association, where his committee work includes cataloging standards development, including RDA best practices for music cataloging, the Library of Congress Medium of Performance Thesaurus and the music portion of the Library of Congress Genre Form Thesaurus... Read More →
AW

Aaron Wood

VP, Systems and Data Architecture, Alexander Street Press


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

The City University of New York: 24 Colleges, 5 Boroughs, 1 Collection
The City University of New York is the third largest public university system in the United States. It consists of eleven senior colleges, seven community colleges, The Macaulay Honors College and five graduate and professional schools located throughout the city’s five boroughs. Though they have their own budgets and report up through separate academic structures, the 21 libraries in the CUNY system are tied tightly together by shared students, shared resources, and shared systems.
This presentation will describe how the campus libraries and the central Office of Library Services work collaboratively to build a collection of electronic resources using different models to align with local and system-wide needs. The benefits and the drawbacks of this hybrid system will be discussed. Special attention will be paid to CUNY’s efforts to use the power of the system as negotiating tool with vendors for better pricing, to develop methods for the selection of various electronic resources, and its use of several years of “cost per usage” data to aid in retention decisions. Technical services/access; collections development; and the new legal and operational aspects of New York State procurement will also be covered.

Speakers
avatar for Curtis Kendrick

Curtis Kendrick

University Dean, The City University of New York
I am passionate about my family and friends, and music.
AS

Angela Sidman

Electronic Resources Librarian, CUNY, Office of Library Services
SV

Susan Vaughn

Associate Librarian for Collection Development, CUNY, Brooklyn College


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

The Fly in the Ointment? Does Open Access = Savings?
The consolidation of scholarly publishers has resulted in higher costs for journal subscriptions and library budgets have been stretched to accommodate price increases. As a result libraries have less latitude in what they choose to purchase to support research and teaching. One solution to the scholarly communication crisis has been the growth of open access journals and alternative publishing streams. Additionally libraries have invested in institutional repositories and some support publishing operations in an effort to offer alternatives to for-profit publishing for faculty and scholarly societies. Are any of these models any more economically sustainable than relying on traditional publishing models? Can a library make intentional decisions to support open access that would provide budget relief and wider dissemination of the intellectual output of their faculty and researchers? Do the various open access models (e.g. Article Processing Charges, OA Institutional Memberships, hybrid journals, SCOAP3-like projects) provide budgetary relief or is this transitional period likely to add costs for a library and its parent institution?

The authors will conduct a survey of 52 U.S. university libraries representing two academic consortia: The Committee on Institutional Cooperation and the Orbis Cascade Alliance. Respondents will be asked to answer a series of questions about direct and indirect costs to the library as a result of open access efforts. The survey will include topics such as: costs to the library to support OA memberships (PLoS, BMC, SpringerOpen, etc); costs to the library to support OA projects such as SCOAP3, arXiv, COPE; new positions in scholarly communication/copyright; and more broadly, whether local institutional repositories, publishing units or outreach efforts to educate faculty about open access have resulted in any direct ability to manage or draw down the costs of their journals spends. The results of the survey and implications for long-term collections planning will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Kim Armstrong

Kim Armstrong

Deputy Director, CIC
Kimberly is currently Deputy Director, Center for Library Initiatives, at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. The CIC, founded in 1958, is an academic consortium of the fourteen Big Ten universities and the University of Chicago. Her current responsibilities include management for the Google book scanning project, the CIC Shared Print Repository and support for working groups on resource sharing, content licensing, and scholarly... Read More →
JS

Jay Starratt

Dean of Libraries, Washington State University
Washington State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

The Quest for the Holy Grail: Too Many ERM Systems Are Not Enough!
Combining punctual statistical data compilation, access to real-time order and payment information, and harmonious workflow and reporting tools in one place has long been the Holy Grail for libraries seeking a reliable means for tracking costly electronic resources. This is the tale of two academic libraries that have adopted very different types of electronic resource management systems to attain these goals.

UT Tyler is one of the fastest-growing universities in the renowned University of Texas System. Supporting a four year academic institution with 7,000 enrolled students, the Robert R. Muntz Library implemented the open source CORAL Electronic Resource Management System developed by the University of Notre Dame in 2010. The decision was based on continuing the library’s existing investment in open source systems, namely the Koha Integrated Library System and Drupal Content Management System. Finding the usage statistics module insufficient for the library’s needs, Robin Schaaf from the University of Notre Dame was contracted to update the functionality in the summer of 2013.

Binghamton University (State University of New York) is the premier public university of the Northeast with an enrollment of 15,000 students. Public Services, Technical Services, and Web Services staff at the Glenn G. Bartle Library share a strong desire for one-stop shopping as well as tools to facilitate collaborative inter-departmental workflows relevant to electronic resource management, particularly in generating statistical, cost-per-use data. BU is currently using two commercial systems: ERM Essentials and 360 Resource Manager with 360 Counter.

This session will provide complementary case studies of the implementation process with emphasis on enhancing functionality of the statistics modules. A question and answer segment will allow participants to share their own perspectives and brainstorm new ideas regarding how to utilize electronic resource management systems in ways that will effectively contribute to long-term budget sustainability at their respective organizations.

Speakers
MD

Margo Duncan

Head of Systems, The University of Texas at Tyler
Margo Duncan is the Head of Systems at the Robert R. Muntz Library at the University of Texas at Tyler. She has a BA in Art History and a BS in Photography, both from Northern Arizona University and an MLS from University of Arizona.
avatar for Stephanie Hess

Stephanie Hess

Electronic Resources Librarian, Binghamton University (SUNY)
Stephanie P. Hess has worked in a variety of Technical Services positions since 1998. She is currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Binghamton University (SUNY) and possesses an extensive background in acquisitions, cataloging, collection development, and serials management.
avatar for Caryl Ward

Caryl Ward

Head of Acquisitions, Binghamton University Libraries
Caryl Ward is Head of Acquisitions at SUNY’s Binghamton University and subject librarian for Comparative Literature, Romance Languages, and Latin American and Caribbean Area Studies. She has 30 years of library experience in several areas, including serials and cataloging. Caryl’s current professional interests include streamlining e book purchasing, library public relations, and information literacy.


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Auditorium, Science and Mathematics Building 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Unnatural Selection: E-Book Choices in a PDA Program from a Community College Perspective
Patron-driven acquisition (PDA) or Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA) has been around for some time now and many large academic libraries have already adopted it. However, not many community colleges have taken a shot at allowing their patrons to do the selection. Since collection development in community college libraries is driven by curricular needs of its students and teaching support for their faculty, titles included in the PDA/DDA pool differ from larger four-year undergraduate libraries. Likewise, usage of titles in the PDA/DDA pool also presents surprising insights into what our patrons are “selecting.” If you think that PDA can’t be done if you don’t have a big budget, then let us prove you wrong.

This presentation will look at Lansing Community College and Gulf Coast State College experience with DDA/PDA, using Ebrary as the vendor and YBP and Coutts as service providers. This session will look into the titles selected by our patrons, including usage, cost, subjects, and publisher data analysis. We will also share budget and financial data that can help community colleges or even a small four-year college gain confidence in trying out a PDA program even on a tight budget. We will also discuss some caveats, lessons learned, and future collection development implications in light of our experience in allowing our patrons do the selection.

Those who attend this session will learn how to implement a PDA program on a very small budget, roadblocks we hit as smaller institutions, and how to analyze the choices students made and tie it up to the overall collection management decisions moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Duff

Sara Duff

Collections Librarian, Gulf Coast State College
Sara Duff is the Collections Librarian for Gulf Coast State College.  In addition to managing the collection, she works as the liaison librarian for the Business & Technology and Visual & Performing Arts departments, occasionally hosts the library’s television show “Check It Out,” coaches the school’s Brain Bowl team, and is a club advisor.  She has previously been involved in presentations on... Read More →
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

Open Educational Resources (OER) Project Manager, Lansing Community College
I'm a librarian and I wear many hats here at LCC. I'm the OER Project Manager as well as Head of Technical Services and Systems. While I always enjoy my work as librarian, open education broadened my horizons. It really dovetails quite nicely with the core values of librarianship to provide everyone with free and equal access to information. I would love to talk to you about your OER projects and how it has impacted students, faculty... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Venturing from the “Back Room”: Do Technical Services Librarians have a Role in Information Literacy?
Catalogers, electronic resources librarians and acquisitions librarians spend a lot of their time in the “back rooms” of the library. Yet even as their roles expand to include participation in innovative library initiatives like institutional repositories, shared print analysis, and digital collections, they are not often consulted on new “reference” activities, like enhancing the information literacy (IL) programs for their library community. Information literacy has become a requirement by many accrediting agencies, making it one of the hottest topics in public services today. There are endless library conferences, workshops and poster sessions devoted to its meaning, methods, and assessment. Is there any connection between Technical Services and Information Literacy? Do technical services professionals have a role at their library for improving information literacy within their user community? Can they have something to contribute to the discussion? This session will offer strong evidence that these “back room” librarians do have a place in IL initiatives and should be included in the conversation. We will offer suggestions for collaborating on IL with your public service colleagues, and we will get you up-to-speed on the information literacy topic by involving the audience in a couple of active learning methods designed for one-shot sessions, including one to explain the IL lingo. Additionally, the session will highlight ways to relate your professional role to IL initiatives, demonstrate how to make time for participation in these initiatives, and provide resources for staying on top of trending IL topics.

Speakers
AN

Alejandra Nann

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, University of San Diego
Alejandra Nann has been the Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian since February 2013.  Her research interests include: Electronic resource assessment and development, ebook acquisitions, and open access.  Alejandra manages the procurement, licensing, and management of all electronic resources and serials.  She is also the liaison to Architecture.  Alejandra holds a B.A. in Art History at the University... Read More →
LS

Laura S Turner

Head of Technical Services, Copley Library, University of San Diego
Laura Turner has served as the Head of Technical Services at Copley Library, University of San Diego since Oct. 2012.  Prior to this appointment, she was the Head of Technical Services at Washington and Lee University in Virginia.  Laura is interested in the role of technical services activities in user access to library resources, in particular within an information literacy framework.  She also studies user interactions with... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

You Have a DDA E-book Plan, Now How Do You Manage It?: Streamlining Individual and Consortial DDA Program Management using the WorldCat Knowledge Base and EBL - Ebook Library Profiling
Many libraries starting Demand-Driven Acquisitions (DDA) e-book programs face challenges and increasing workloads with loading records, ensuring discoverability by their patrons, and deciding when and what titles to remove as the plan ages. Come hear about the experiences of an individual library - Kreitzberg Library at Norwich University, and a library consortium with a shared DDA plan - the Virtual Library of Virginia. Both utilize the WorldCat knowledge base and the EBL profiling system to automate portions of the record management and collection development workflows. Attendees will learn about:

  • Efficiencies gained by using a knowledge base to select records, including a process for distributing records to libraries sharing a DDA plan that also allows each library to add local customizations
  • A means of automatically rolling titles out of a DDA plan (“automated weeding”) based on publication date, publisher, and previous usage. 
  • Differences between managing a local and a consortial DDA program.

A discussion with the audience will follow the presentations.

Speakers
SF

Sara Finch

Senior Information Developer, OCLC
JH

John Holm

Electronic Resources Librarian, Norwich University
avatar for Anne Osterman

Anne Osterman

VIVA Director, VIVA - The Virtual Library of Virginia
Anne Osterman is a librarian with over ten years of experience in academic libraries. She has worked in a variety of roles, including research data services, reference and instruction, acquisitions, and the licensing of electronic resources. She is currently Director of the Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA), the consortium of nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia. Anne holds a Master's degree in Library Science from... Read More →
avatar for Sadie Williams

Sadie Williams

Director of Product Marketing, Workflow Solutions, ProQuest


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

4:00pm

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Copyright Clearance Center

Thursday November 7, 2013 4:00pm - 4:25pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:25pm

Lifelong Learning
VIDEO

In the spirit of "anything worth doing is worth doing superficially" John Dove will give us, in classic "pecha kucha" style, a presentation on the theme of this year's conference.   There will be 20 slides and they are automatically progressed every twenty seconds.  John presented his first pecha kucha inspired presentation at the 13th Fiesole Collection Development Retreat in St. Petersburg, Russia in May of 2011.   Ever since the Charleston Conference has included "Shotgun" sessions of 6 minute 40 second presentations of which there are several scheduled throughout the conference. 

Speakers
avatar for John Dove

John Dove

Senior Publisher, Credo Reference
John Dove has been CEO, then President, and now Senior Publisher at Credo Reference. Though not a librarian by training, John has always advocated the position that companies serving libraries need to find ways to incorporate the special skills, outlook, and values of librarians in the products and services that they offer. John's first presence with the library world was in the mid-90's when he was President and COO of Silverplatter... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 4:25pm - 4:35pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:35pm

If the University is in the Computer, Where Does That Leave the Library? MOOCs Discovered
VIDEO

Meg White (intro slides)

Rick Anderson (slides)
Lynn Sutton (slides)

Meredith Schwartz (slides)

Massive Open Online Courses are disrupting the traditional view of learning and the academy.  Using technology, high-quality courses taught by some of the brightest minds are now available to unprecedented numbers of students.   The university now has the potential to be in the computer.  And, if the university is truly in the computer, what does that mean for the library? 

In this plenary session, Meredith Schwartz from Library Journal will share highlights from her article Massive Open Opportunity: Supporting MOOCs in Public and Academic Libraries, with an emphasis on academic communities.  Key topics will include definitions, current and future trends, and the potential impact of MOOCs on the library’s role, financials, policies, and collections. Learn more about this growing phenomenon and how your library can be involved.  Ms. Schwartz will be joined by Lynn Sutton, PhD, Dean, Z Smith Reynolds Library Wake Forest University and Rick Anderson, Interim Dean, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah, who will provide insights and comments on this topic from the front lines of their institutions. 

Join us for this exciting session on one of the hottest topics effecting education today.

Moderators
avatar for Meg White

Meg White

Executive Director of Technology Services, Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc.
Meg White is a twenty-year veteran of the health sciences publishing industry. Her background includes various sales, marketing, and product development positions at Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Mosby, Williams & Wilkins, and Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. She is a frequent speaker at industry-related conferences on the topics of product development, technology, curriculum, and continuing medical education... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
avatar for Meredith Schwartz

Meredith Schwartz

Executive Editor, Library Journal
Meredith Schwartz is Executive Editor for Library Journal, and author of the article "Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries."
avatar for Lynn Sutton

Lynn Sutton

Dean, Z Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forrest University
Lynn Sutton, Ph.D. is Dean of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC. Under her leadership, the ZSR Library has focused on outreach to students and faculty and has become the unquestioned intellectual center of campus. Known for its innovative and creative approach, ZSR was the winner of the 2011 ACRL Excellence in Academic Libraries Award. Previously, Lynn served as Associate Dean at Wayne State... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 4:35pm - 5:35pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

6:00pm

Networking Happy Hour
New event for 2013! Mix and mingle with other conference attendees over a beverage and a snack while visiting the Poster Sessions.  Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available to purchase beverages.

Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

A Collection Explosion: Evaluating a Collection 145 Years in the Making
This poster takes a retrospective look at the original collection at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and illustrates the extreme growth in the collections over the years. The University Library began with just 1,083 volumes in 1868, and that number nearly quadrupled in two years, increasing the collection to 4,051 volumes by 1870. Now, 145 years later, the collection has exploded to contain more than 13 million volumes. What was the composition of the original collection, and where did it go? Other than size, how did that collection differ from the collection of today? Does this tell us anything about the collection of tomorrow? This poster will explore the collection development policies and guiding principles at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and how those have changed and have shaped the collection over time. We will provide a collection analysis, as well as graphical representations of the collection, looking more closely at the contents of this research library collection, both in the Library’s infancy and today, and discover trends that have developed over time. As the Library approaches its sesquicentennial, we must look more closely at what it meant and continues to mean to have a premier research collection, thinking critically about where and how our collection should grow from here.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Maddox Abbott

Jennifer Maddox Abbott

Technical Services Project Coordinator, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Mary Laskowski

Mary Laskowski

Head, Collection Management Services, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
MN

Michael Norman

Associate Professor, University of Illinois-Urbana


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Acquisition Budget Allocation at CSU Library Using Algorithm: How Do You Do It at Your Library?
In 2000, Chicago State University hired a new dean who came in the position and discovered, beside the budget crisis that the library had been having for many years back, he also realized that there was no formal system of distributing the small budget the library received every year for acquisitions of materials for the various discipline on campus. The money was divided out on the first come first serve basis until it was all used up. There were specific allocations made if a college was starting a new program or going up for accreditation. In terms of resources, he noticed that some areas were not receiving the financial attention needed for well rounded programs. That was when he decided to develop a formal way of equitably allocating budgets for acquisition of library resources, now known as the “Algorithm." Although sometimes referred to as a matrix, this spreadsheet of formulas shows variables and the distribution amongst the various subject selection areas.

As the Acquisitions Librarian and the Chair of the Collection Development Committee, some of the selectors express dissatisfaction with the algorithm set up, want an open discussion on how to improve the way the formulas are set up or remove some of the variables used. There is a feeling amongst some of librarians that some variables included in the algorithm contribute to an unfair distribution of funds.
I want this to be a discussion of the methods of acquisition budget distribution for library materials. I want to see if other libraries are satisfied with their methods of budget distributions and what are the methods they use.

Speakers
AK

Azungwe Kwembe

Serial/Acquisitions Librarian, Chicago State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Beyond COUNTER: Using IP Data to Evaluate Our Users
This poster will present the results of an in-depth analysis of resource usage by IP address at the University of Virginia. Usage data by IP address was obtained from several library vendors. Due to the design of UVa’s network infrastructure, an analysis of this data allows us to glean much more granular information about our various user communities and how and where they are accessing our resources than the general, COUNTER-compliant reports. Importantly, this increased level of detail can be achieved while maintaining user anonymity.

This analysis gives us the ability to break down our overall usage by user community, such as faculty vs. student use. Additionally, it gives us an unbiased metric of where our users are when conducting their research, and will be compared to our various user surveys, which have asked our faculty and students to self-identify their own research habits.

Following the successful conclusion of this project, several other avenues will open up for additional research, including applying the same types of analysis to our proxy server logs and citation management statistics.

Speakers
TM

Timothy Morton

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Virginia


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Beyond ROI: Challenges and Opportunities in Overseas Buying Trips
For collection development librarians, an overseas buying trip can be an excellent opportunity to acquire unique and rare items, benefit from discounts and favorable exchange rates and solidify relationships with foreign vendors. Moreover, buying trips can help librarians network with international peers, develop professionally, build confidence and, for area studies specialists, maintain an authentic connection with their area of specialization. Yet buying trips are also fraught with challenges ranging from logistics and planning, to avoiding duplication and impulse purchases. I will draw on my experiences planning and executing a buying trip to India in January 2012, as well as my interviews with South Asian subject specialist colleagues, to lay out a framework for best practices in overseas buying trips. Session attendees will leave the session able to begin a conversation with their library’s administration about going on an overseas buying trip as well the tools to draft an effective proposal and plan for the trip.

Speakers
avatar for Mara Thacker

Mara Thacker

South Asian Studies Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Cheap and (relatively) Easy PDA: A Conservative and Successful Pilot Project
In November 2012, a small task force was created to start working on a PDA pilot. We knew that we wanted to do a PDA pilot in the spring through our book provider, YPB, and that we wanted to take the rather unusual step of working with two e-book platforms, Ebrary and EBL. We were working with a limited budget and, based on the literature about other libraries’ experiences with this purchasing model, we were very cautious about how many records we loaded. The pilot was launched in March 2013 and at the end of the fiscal year we found ourselves with a successful implementation of PDA that came in under budget, and that we could continue into the new fiscal year despite the overall collections budget being much tighter for FY2014. In this poster, we will describe the parameters we used for ensuring a slow but steady stream of records into our system, the challenges of working with two e-book platforms, our timeline from discussion to implementation and how much traffic the loaded records received. Attendees can expect to learn how to they can experiment with PDA even within the constraints of a more limited budget.

Speakers
avatar for Amelia Brunskill

Amelia Brunskill

Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources, DePaul University
Amelia Brunskill is the Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources at DePaul University. She was previously DePaul's Electronic Resources Librarian and prior to that she was the Liaison Librarian for the Sciences at Dickinson College, in Carlisle, PA. She received her MSIS from the University of Texas at Austin in 2006. 
NC

Nicole Casner

Serials & Acquisitions Coordinator, DePaul University Library


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Comparison of Publishers with Mobile Accessibility for Ebooks
Mobile technology has accelerated to meet the demands of users; however publishers are still behind on adapting the accessibility of their resources for mobile devices. This shift away from personal desktops to mobile devices has made it more difficult acquiring electronic resources that are specifically designed for or have been optimized to be utilized on mobile devices. Even more challenging are acquiring subscriptions to these resources that is within the allotted expenditure. And in addition to this, the publishers that are mobile-friendly either don’t offer or can have complicated site license terms.
This poster presents a comparison and analysis of ebook publishers that are mobile accessible. While some of the publishers have been able to enhance the learning experience by enabling interactive features, it might come with restrictions to copyright, limited users, high cost or poor title section. And though other publishers might have a wide title selection, the ebook might be nothing more than text on a screen.
There is much potential for mobile technology to advance cooperative collaboration within education and create a new level of freedom with learning, however cost and restrictions with accessing the electronic resources remains to be the fundamental problem. Librarians have many options to choose from, and while no one publisher is perfect, this poster will present the pros and cons associated with each publisher.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Gudenas

Jean Gudenas

Head of Collections Management, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Library
For the past five years, Jean Gudenas has been the Head of Collections Management for Loyola University Health Sciences Library in Maywood, Illinois. In that time, she has facilitated the transition of a largely print-based collection to a nearly all-electronic collection. Her current focus is determining what a collection is, specifically with the philosophy behind access versus ownership . She received her BA in Philosophy and English from... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Creating a Richer Patron Driven Acquisitions Experience for Your Users: How the University of Arizona Forced 3 PDA Programs to Play Nicely Together
The University of Arizona Libraries (UAL) is heavily invested in patron driven acquisitions and acquires much of their materials this way. Since 2011, UAL entered into an agreement with Coutts Information Services for two PDA programs, one print and one electronic. It took time to work out the kinks of two programs in different formats but we’ve successfully gotten them both working. As of July 2013, UAL added a third PDA program, which is for electronic resources only and is through the vendor Yankee Book Peddler. It is based on the same profile that we use for our Coutts programs. We added this third PDA program so we could take advantage of the different ebook platforms that are offered from the two vendors. Users may select from a richer and more complete offering of academic titles. Obviously this has added a layer of complexity, especially with the handling of duplications.

The objective of my poster session is to walk attendees through a visual representation of the workflow of our three PDA programs, including upfront planning, steps in the process, troubleshooting, and a summary of what works well and what needs improvement.

I plan to encourage attendees to talk about their PDA programs and to find out if there are any other libraries that are also using multiple PDA programs to meet the needs of their users. This would hopefully spark constructive dialogue on process improvement and innovation within PDA programs in academic libraries. I want attendees to my poster session to take away ideas of how implementing multiple PDA programs in both print and electronic formats with more than one vendor could work at their institution.

Speakers
TH

Teresa Hazen

Technical Services Librarian, The University of Arizona


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Determining Allied Health Core Titles
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to develop an up-to-date, authoritative list of allied health journals for both collection management purposes as well as for identification of publication opportunities for faculty.

Methods: For individual allied health disciplines, core published lists have been analyzed and journal ranking metrics have been examined. The core published lists included the Brandon/Hill List, the MLA master guide list, and the previous mapping studies developed by the MLA Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section. The journal ranking metrics included Journal Citation Report’s impact factor, the Eigenfactor article influence score, the 2011 Scopus journal rank, and the source-normalized impact per paper (SNIP) metric.

Results: The core published lists were effective in initial identification of critical titles for the specialties. The journal ranking metrics identified provided a more objective and reliable method for journal selection.

Conclusions: The analysis revealed a list of important journals for each discipline in the allied health field. The list will be beneficial to libraries in identifying critical titles in their collection management efforts, as well as for faculty seeking journals in which to publish in their particular allied health discipline.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Britton

Robert Britton

Electronic Resources/Collection Development Librarian, University of South Alabama


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

ILL's Return on Investment: Why ILL is Still a Great Collection Tool
As the cost of maintaining collections have increased over the years, the past decade has seen a shift from just-in-case acquisitions policies to just-in-time acquisitions. Demand-driven programs are developing across the country. In this time of shrinking budgets, does it still make sense to borrow materials rather than use ILL as a demand-driven method? Does the return on investment of ILL merit its continued existence or could we potentially be saving money if we bought instead of borrowed?

Speakers
avatar for Gerrit van Dyk

Gerrit van Dyk

Access Services Manager, Brigham Young University


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Mobilizing the Virtual Library: A Next Generation Concept for Discovery and Content Consumption
At MacEwan University Libraries we understand the importance of providing our virtual library space in a framework that is optimized for mobile devices. Many of our students use mobile devices on a regular basis and most of them have attempted to access the library’s resources on their mobile device. Statistics inspired the library to invest in developing a mobile optimized environment so that students and faculty could easily access and consume library resources.

This poster will illustrate how the library integrated content from the EBSCO Discovery System, functionality from the Integrated Library System, and data from the library’s website into an iPhone Application. Future plans for mobile frameworks will be explained, as well as statistical analysis and rational that supports the direction and goals of the project. Learn what virtual services integration means at MacEwan University Libraries and why it is important to the next generation of user experience design initiatives in libraries.

Speakers
RZ

Robert Zylstra

Campus Librarian, MacEwan University


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Not Just a Bookkeeper: Planning & Describing Your Work with Promotions (and Tenure) in Mind
Want to earn a promotion, make tenure, or land the next interview? Start thinking strategically about your career and learn to describe your work to non-librarians. This poster will compare ways of describing the work of technical services librarians so non-librarians understand how we contribute to the teaching and research mission of a university. As Ginger’s third-year tenure track review said, “You’re not just a bookkeeper, but that’s how you describe your work.” So, how did Ginger change her description to make tenure and how is Lizzy learning to describe her work as a new tenure-track librarian?

Speakers
avatar for Lizzy Walker

Lizzy Walker

Metadata and Digital Initiatives Librarian, Wichita State University Libraries
Lizzy Walker earned her Masters in Library Science at the University of North Texas, Denton, and her Bachelor of Arts in English Literature and Creative Writing, as well as a Minor in Early European History, at Boise State University. She started at the Wichita State University Libraries as Metadata and Digital Initiatives Librarian in Spring 2013. She has a background in public services and metadata. She also has a strong interest in medieval... Read More →
avatar for Ginger Williams

Ginger Williams

Associate Professor & Acquisitions Librarian, Wichita State University
Ginger made it halfway through an accounting major before deciding that money was boring & switching to history. The accounting coursework's proved useful in her career in K-12 schools and academic libraries. Lately, she's been thinking about taking a few more accounting courses, but isn't quite sure she's ready for more lectures on depreciation methods and other exciting topics.


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Rediscovering the Lost World of Print Serials
As more and more print serials are replaced in favor of electronic versions, discoverability of print content is vital for seamless access to library resources. Mississippi State University Libraries worked to enhance the discoverability of print journals within the online catalog through a detailed inventory project and subsequent “clean-up” of MARC holdings statements in the libraries’ ILS. Not only was this project incorporated in order to assist MSU students and faculty in the discoverability of print journals, but also to display more accurate holdings for collection analysis and in OCLC for interlibrary loan. Attendees can expect to learn how to transform confusing holdings records while still following acceptable MARC holdings standards.

Speakers
MD

Melody Dale

Assistant Professor/Serials Cataloger, Mississippi State University
DM

Derek Marshall

Coordinator of the College of Veterinary Medicine Library, Mississippi State University


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Roving Exhibits
Book exhibits are commonplace in most libraries, but the idea of Roving Exhibits just recently came about at the Alkek Library. In the Fall 2013, an exhibit was set up at a student event, a PowWow celebration of native oral tradition, sponsored by the Native American Student Association. The exhibit was a culmination of collection development efforts on the part of the education liaison, who is also in charge of the juvenile collection, over the course of 5 years. Students and attendees were able to see an exhibit of recommended books as well as those considered not recommended. The exhibit also showcased winners of the American Indian Youth Literature Book Award as well as a now defunct and smaller award, the Michael Lacapa. Attendees had the opportunity to take a research guide that listed all the books and bibliographies in the exhibit as well as links to catalog searches to pull up award winners. http://libguides.txstate.edu/native-american

Continuation and expansion of roving exhibits will provide an opportunity for the library to physically take in-library exhibits out to the university community so that they can see all the library has to offer related to their interests. Looking for possible exhibit opportunites also prompts librarians to ensure adequate material is related to various student organizations and events. Many attendees at the PowWow exhibit commented that they didn't even realize the library had such resources or a juvenile collection.

Speakers
avatar for Arlene Salazar

Arlene Salazar

Instruction & Reference Librarian, Education Subject Librarian, Texas State University
I am the education subject Librarian, but I also work with social work. Education covers curriculum and instruction, and counseling, which includes the school psychology program. I have worked with these departments for the past 15 years at Alkek Library. @alkeklib_arlene


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Stacks Reorganization at a Small Liberal Arts School
The Boatwright Library stacks working group is a team compromised of members of different departments who represent key stakeholders in the future of our physical collections. The group is currently in the midst of working on a stacks reorganization plan as well as planning the future of our physical collections here at Boatwright Library. The group would like to present a poster outlining this stacks re-organization timeline.

The poster will include aspects of what has happened in the past, present, and future. It will identify both successes of our project as well as pitfalls. We believe that this will generate helpful discussion and ideas to similar sized libraries as well as ideas that could be applied to larger and smaller libraries. Audience members will be engaged during the poster presentation by asking questions about our process. Both smaller and larger institutions will be able to learn about what was positive and negative about our reorganization process.

Additional Contributors: Tom Campagnoli, Integrated Library Systems Administrator; Lynda Kachurek, Head Rare Books and Special Collections; Catherine Clements, Special Formats Cataloging Librarian.

Speakers
KH

Katherine Hoffman

Customer Service Associate, University of Richmond
CL

Carrie Ludovico

Instruction Librarian, School of Professional and Continuing Studies, University of Richmond
TS

Travis Smith

Stacks, Building, and Interlibrary Loan Supervisor, University of Richmond


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Study Psychology Researchers’ Citing Behavior For Collection Development
In today’s higher education environment, academic librarians not only need to develop a relevant collection that supports campus research and teaching, but also need to be able to articulate how the collection has contributed to the institution’s success. Citation analysis, a way to understand users’ information behavior, can help us to do both. Nonetheless citation analyses can be a time-consuming undertaking. How can we take full advantage of this type of work without draining our time and energy? What types of data can we draw from citation analysis to help us articulate the value of our collections? The Psychology Librarian and the Collection & Online Resources Coordinator at the University of Houston Libraries will share their experience of using SCOPUS to run citation analysis. The aim of their study was to examine how psychology researchers use information sources for their work and how the library collections have contributed to the university’s scholarly output. The librarians analyzed the references cited in articles published by psychology researchers at the University of Houston over the past 10 years. The study was further enhanced by comparative analysis with usage statistics. Through the presentation, the presenters will share their data collection and analysis procedures and study results. They will also discuss the value of using SPSS to run multivariate analyses. The audience will learn the advantages and disadvantages of using SCOPUS as a citation analysis tool and be able to consider whether the tool meets their particular assessment needs. The presenters will also offer their observations on how comparative statistical analyses can benefit collection assessment and enrich findings.

Speakers
avatar for Jackie Bronicki

Jackie Bronicki

Assessment & Statistics, University of Houston
University of Houston
avatar for Irene Ke

Irene Ke

Psychology & Social Work Librarian, University of Houston
I am the Psychology and Social Work Librarian at the University of Houston. I am passionate about learning.


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Virtual Verse in the Library: Surveying the e-Poetry Landscape
In a 2009 issue of Poets & Writers, poet Sandra Beasley said the literary world was confronting “the reality that print venues…are rapidly ceding ground to Web-based publishing.” Online literary journals, e-zines, and print publications’ websites allow literature to be disseminated more extensively than ever before, and into a wider variety of settings, including the classroom.

While many of these online publications follow the quality control guidelines of print publications, the egalitarian nature of web publishing has raised questions about the value of online literature. Poets in faculty positions face the same tenure requirements as their colleagues in other academic departments and also must consider journal quality and impact when selecting a publication venue.

In order to explore their opinions and behavior related to online literary publishing, we surveyed faculty at Creative Writing Master’s of Fine Arts-granting institutions, and conducted subsequent interviews with select faculty members. This research uncovered interesting and sometimes unexpected commentary about the Internet’s role in the art of poetry.

Although web-based literary publishing has made poetry more accessible, most online-only poetry is not indexed in standard resources such as Humanities International Complete. In the interest of improving discoverability, we also asked respondents to describe resources that might make online-only poetry more accessible. This poster will also share our respondents’ aggregated “wish list” of features for such a tool.

Speakers
RF

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences; University of Tennessee
Rachel Fleming-May is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee’s School of Information Sciences. Her research and teaching interests include assessment, academic librarianship, and the intersection of creative writing and information


Thursday November 7, 2013 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Bistro Area, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

7:00pm

Annual Reception
Charleston is well known for its hospitality, and the Annual Reception is a true Charleston affair! The reception this year will be held at the South Carolina Aquarium.  Delicious lowcountry specialties, such as shrimp & grits and a biscuit bar, as well as more familiar reception fare, will be served. Musical entertainment by The Bluestone Ramblers, a Charleston-based bluegrass band.  The event will be set up in a covered outdoor area in addition to indoor access to the Visitors Center, so dress appropriately for the weather.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Thursday November 7, 2013 7:00pm - 9:00pm
SC Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston, SC
 
Friday, November 8
 

7:00am

Continental Breakfast
Sponsored by New England Journal of Medicine

Friday November 8, 2013 7:00am - 8:00am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:00am

Opening Remarks
Moderators
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Assistant Dean Technical Services, Addlestone Library, College of Charleston

Friday November 8, 2013 8:00am - 8:05am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:05am

Collections Are For Collisions: Let’s Design It into the Experience
VIDEO

We talk about collections all the time. How to build and share them. How to provide access. How to enlist the community in selecting.  How to prove the value of collections.  How to use collection statistics. We even talk about collections that are hidden and how to get rid of the ones we no longer need. What we infrequently discuss is how to get community members connected with the collections. A hot topic of conversation, particularly in the design of work environments, is how to create collisions that lead to good outcomes. In this plenary session Steven Bell, Associate University Librarian at Temple University, will share insights into why we need to start talking about designing our libraries, both physical and virtual, with collisions in mind. If the whole point of collections is to facilitate interactions with discovery, research and learning, then we have to come up with better ways to design it into the library experience.

Speakers
avatar for Steven J. Bell

Steven J. Bell

Associate University Librarian, Temple University
I enjoy exploring the intersection of academic librarianship and higher education. I'm passionate about exploring how we design better library experiences for community members - and the ways we can better integrate the academic library into the teaching and learning that happens at our institutions. Follow me at /blendedlib or my Library Journal Academic Newswire columns http://lj.libraryjournal.com/category/opinion/steven-bell/ and... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 8:05am - 8:45am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:45am

What Provosts Want Librarians to Know
Beth Paul's Slides
John Vaughn's Slides

VIDEO


Three senior leaders will reveal what Provosts worry about when they think about libraries. Charged to be frank and direct, they will talk about what they value in libraries, but also about what the challenges are that they face that affect how they think about libraries.  Budget, facilities, and their perception of what faculty and students want and need will all play into this.  This session is an opportunity for a frank exchange of views with real provosts -- without worrying about how they react!

Moderators
avatar for James O'Donnell

James O'Donnell

University Librarian & Professor, Arizona State University Libraries
James J. O'Donnell is the University Librarian at ASU Libraries.He has published widely on the history and culture of the late antique Mediterranean world and is a recognized innovator in the application of networked information technology in higher education. In 1990, he co-founded Bryn Mawr Classical Review, the second on-line scholarly journal in the humanities ever created. In 1994, he taught an Internet-based seminar on the work of Augustine... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Beth Paul

Beth Paul

Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Stetson University
Beth Paul is a psychologist specializing in personality psychology, now with long experience in higher ed admin at the College of New Jersey and at Stetson, where she has served as Provost since 2009. She is specially interested in strategic planning and community-based service learning.
avatar for Jeanine Stewart

Jeanine Stewart

Provost and Dean of Faculty, McDaniel College
Jeanine Stewart is a neuroscientist and experienced administrator. She joined McDaniel College this summer as Provost, after serving in the same role at Hollins University and before that as interim dean at Washington and Lee.  Her focus is student-centered liberal arts education, with an emphasis on innovation.
JV

John Vaughn

Executive Vice President, Association of American Universities
John Vaughn has serve as EVP of the AAU since 1996, He is general deputy to the president and COO of the organization, but he has a particular portfolio and interest in the areas of intellectual property, information technology, research libraries and scholarly communication. He has had broad engagement with research libraries and involvement in many initiatives concerning them.


Friday November 8, 2013 8:45am - 10:00am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:00am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Elsevier

Friday November 8, 2013 10:00am - 10:30am
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Charleston Neapolitan: Content, Services and Space: The Future of the Library As Lines Blur
VIDEO

Traditional roles of libraries, publishers, service providers, and even patrons are continually changing. Libraries increasingly take on functions previously managed by publishers—in some cases, by actually becoming traditional publishers, through the absorption of university press operations and the creation of IR-based journals, and in some cases by making direct investments in dissemination, by underwriting Open Access APCs. Librarians are expanding into learning, instructional design, software development and more, providing services around the world to a much wider range of patrons.  Meanwhile, patron driven initiatives are continue to alter the way libraries acquire content, giving rise to questions about how collections are built and how publisher business models are morphing. Content types are blurring. Textbooks, reference works, journals, books, audio, video, learning tools, lectures, primary sources and more are all fair game for course materials, often delivered via Learning Management Systems—bringing publishers and services into the space as well. Four industry veterans discuss this rapidly changing landscape, identifying key trends and key questions: What happens when libraries become publishers or service providers? How do we measure the success and value of patrons as selectors? What role does discovery play in the modern library? How can subscription content best be leveraged in the classroom? How can pricing be more visible to all? How can assessment help instructors and libraries make better-informed decisions? If these overlapping trends continue, they bring with them interesting possibilities for the shifting nature of the library and for a new understanding of what it means to "publish." Come prepared with your own examples of the changing nature of education. Will the library of the future be the disruptor or the disrupted?

Moderators
avatar for David Parker

David Parker

VP, Editorial & Licensing, Alexander Street a ProQuest Company
David Parker is VP Editorial and Licensing for Alexander Street – the leading provider of video, multi-media databases and unique, curated content to the global university library market. Prior to his role with Alexander Street, David founded Business Expert Press and served as the President of Business Expert Press and its sister company, Momentum Press. BEP and MP specialize in applied, concise ebooks for advanced business and engineering... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
NG

Nancy Gibbs

Head, Acquisitions Department, Duke University Libraries
Nancy Gibbs is head of Acquisitions at Duke University Libraries, The department is responsible for ordering all monographs, serials, periodicals and electronic resources and orders, receives, and catalogs non-Roman language materials. She has held positions at Penn State University Libraries as a Reference Librarian and Head of Personnel; Auburn University as a Humanities Cataloger and Approval Plan Librarian; and at North Carolina State... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Rhind-Tutt

Stephen Rhind-Tutt

President, Alexander Street Press
Rhind-Tutt has worked in electronic publishing for libraries for more than 27 years. Before co-founding Alexander Street Press in 2000, he worked for Gale, Proquest/Chadwyck-Healey, and SilverPlatter in a number of different roles. During that time he was responsible for the creation or development of more than 400 different products serving a wide range of libraries.
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Publisher and Content Strategy, ProQuest SIPX
I'm passionate about online learning, publisher and library technology, and wearables!


Friday November 8, 2013 10:30am - 11:15am
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Charleston Neapolitan: Don't Be an Invisible Library!
Glenn Johnson-Grau (slides)

VIDEO

The role of the library keeps changing, particularly with the development of new education models and technologies.  User behaviors are changing too, and libraries need to adapt and use different approaches in providing library services and access to content.  Digital tools make online content search easy, but sometimes the value the library brings gets lost, even though it is the library that purchases, sets up and maintains that online access to content.  The most recent Ithaka US Faculty Survey highlights this misunderstanding - a large percentage of scientists feel that “because faculty have easy access to academic content online, the role librarians play at <their> institution is becoming much less important”.

What new value-added benefits and services can libraries consider to help teaching faculty and researchers, or increase the prestige of their school?  As higher education explores online and MOOC opportunities, how can libraries provide support?  

Rick Burke, Executive Director of SCELC, will share challenges he hears from libraries. As the e-resource marketplace has evolved, the need has grown for tools to help libraries promote and manage access to those resources, while providing a means to assert the library's role in making those resources available.  He will discuss SCELC's experiences in bringing these tools to the consortial marketplace.

Matt Goldner, Product and Technology Advocate of OCLC, will give insights on the changing relationship between library and school community, as well as OCLC's initiatives to help libraries adjust to the new landscapes.

Franny Lee, Co-Founder of SIPX, will discuss the research conducted by the Stanford Intellectual Property Exchange on measuring the content access benefits that the library relationship brings to higher education students, as well as SIPX's experiences translating requests and feedback from libraries into opportunities for copyright education and user interface design that makes the library's role visible.

Glenn Johnson-Grau, Head of Collection Development at Loyola Marymount University, will discuss the effect of diminishing visibility on academic libraries as users decreasingly associate the "library" with the physical collection and the new opportunities that open when we strengthen campus relationships and reassert our value in the academic mission of our organizations. 

Speakers
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
MG

Matt Goldner

Product and Technology Advocate, OCLC
avatar for Glenn Johnson-Grau

Glenn Johnson-Grau

Head of Acquisitions & Collection Development, Loyola Marymount University
Glenn Johnson-Grau is Head of Collection Development at Loyola Marymount University. He frequently reminds himself that all is flux and nothing stays still.
avatar for franny lee

franny lee

GM and VP SIPX (Co-Founder), SIPX (ProQuest, Ex Libris)
Franny Lee is GM and VP ProQuest SIPX and leads the team.  Franny is dedicated to harnessing technology to make content, copyright and education more accessible and affordable. She is a frequent speaker and writer on the emerging issues at the intersection of campus needs, libraries, online education, digital content and high technology, and serves on the Management Board of MIT Press.  Originally a composer and jazz musician, Franny... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 10:30am - 11:15am
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Charleston Neapolitan: Open Access, Public Access: Policies, Implementation, Developments, and the Future of US Published Research.
Amy Friedlander (slides)

Howard Ratner (slides)

Judy Ruttenberg (slides)

John Wilbanks (slides)

VIDEO

In February, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released a memo directing each US funding agency with over $100 million in annual research expenditure to develop a plan to support public access to the results of research funded by the federal government, including results published in scholarly journals.  How has the OSTP memo impacted scholarly publishing so far? What exactly has been achieved so far and what will it mean for the future of US published research?  This interactive session features a panel of speakers who will be discussing the recent developments and emerging issues from the librarian, funder, researcher, and publisher perspectives.  Among the questions to be addressed are:
  • What is the US position on implementing open access?
  • What steps have been taken to implement OSTP objectives?
  • What role do institutional repositories play in open access?
  • How will funder’s open access policies impact universities and researchers?
  • What role are publishers playing in the implementation of open access?
  • How will open access content be linked and measured? Will it affect usage? 


Moderators
avatar for Alicia Wise

Alicia Wise

Director of Universal Access, Elsevier
Alicia is very passionate about expanding access to information, and particularly enjoys developing successful partnerships across complex stakeholder communities. Her areas of expertise lie at the intersection of copyright and digital technology. She joined Elsevier in June 2010 to lead the Universal Access team. In this role she is responsible for our access strategy and policies, including open access, and for building relationships with other... Read More →

Speakers
AF

Amy Friedlander

Senior Advisor, National Science Foundation
avatar for Howard Ratner

Howard Ratner

Executive Director, CHORUS
I am passionate about constantly improving the scholarly communications ecosystem with standards and technology. My most recent endeavor is CHORUS - the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States. I was CTO and Executive Vice President, Nature Publishing Group, and was instrumental in the founding of such not-for-profit joint ventures as CrossRef, the collaborative reference linking service between the world’s scholarly publishing... Read More →
avatar for Judy Ruttenberg

Judy Ruttenberg

Program Director, Association of Research Libraries
Judy Ruttenberg is primarily responsible for managing the SHARE initiative, which is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. While at ARL, Judy has also directed the Transforming Research Libraries initiative, which included responsibility for e-research and special collections working groups. Judy works closely with her colleagues in public policy and diversity and inclusion in advancing... Read More →
avatar for John Wilbanks

John Wilbanks

Chief Commons Officer, Sage Bionetworks
John Wilbanks grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. He attended Tulane University and received a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy in 1994. He also studied modern letters at the Sorbonne in Paris. From 1994 to 1997, he worked in Washington, DC as a legislative aide to Congressman Fortney "Pete" Stark. During this time Wilbanks was also a grassroots coordinator and fundraiser for the American Physical Therapy Association. John was the Berkman Center... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 10:30am - 11:15am
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

"To Mediate, or Not Mediate, That is the Question:" Setting up Get It Now at Furman University Libraries
Get It Now from Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) complements your interlibrary loan (ILL) services by providing library patrons with the immediate fulfillment of full-text articles from unsubscribed journals -- 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

In late spring 2013 Furman Library set up unmediated, Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) access to our pay-per view journals through Get It Now (GiN). Working with the Copyright Clearance Center, and EBSCO, Furman set up a custom link to allow students unmediated access to titles previously available only through Interlibrary Loan or via mediated pay-per-view access. On Tuesday May 21, 2013 we began offering unmediated access to journal articles. Since that time Furman students, faculty, and staff have directly ordered 75 articles through GiN. Collection Services plans to promote GiN in fall 2013.

In this presentation you will learn how Furman set up this program, what it involves, and get an idea of student/faculty response. A Copyright Clearance Center representative will then take over the presentation to discuss their part of the process and answer questions.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bowen

Tim Bowen

Director, Academic Products & Services, Copyright Clearance Center
Tim Bowen is the Director of Academic Products & Services at Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) in Danvers, Massachusetts. He joined Copyright Clearance Center in 2003 and is responsible for the development and management of CCC's pay-per use and annual licensing services for academic institutions as well as their award-winning Get It Now article delivery service. Mr. Bowen has over 20 years of product management, product marketing, and channels... Read More →
avatar for Janet Nazar

Janet Nazar

Coordinator of Content Management/Collection Services, Furman University Library
I serve as the Coordinator of Content Management in Collection Services at the J.B. Duke Library, Furman University in Greenville, SC. I have worked at the Furman library for 14 years and have experience in cataloging, electronic resources management and acquisitions. On a personal note, I enjoy "B" movies, cooking and speak conversational Farsi.


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Alma in the Cloud: Implementation through the Eyes of Acquisitions
This session will provide an overview of the VCU Libraries’ journey from implementation up until “Go Live” through the eyes of the Acquisitions Department at Virginia Commonwealth University. This session will explain why the VCU Libraries decided to become an Early Adopter of the Ex Libris Alma system. As Early Adopters, there were many challenges encountered by the Implementation Task Force. The Task Force had to make configuration decisions, attend training sessions, conduct internal training sessions, analyze existing workflows, improve the efficiency of workflows and review configuration and migrated data. The objective of the session will be to identify the work involved in preparing for and implementing a cloud-based library management system. It will discuss the advantages of moving to a cloud-based system and challenges encountered. Attendees will learn about implementation processes, cleanup and workflow issues and how issues and problems are reported to Ex Libris. Finally, this session will share lessons learned by the Alma Implementation Task Force.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Branch

Denise Branch

Head, Continuing Resources, Virginia Commonwealth University
Denise is a native of Powhatan, Virginia and the Head of Continuing Resources at the VCU Libraries, earning her B.S. from VCU and M.L.I.S. from The Catholic University of America. Managing e-serials within the Ex Libris Alma and Primo system keeps her busy. She contributes her expertise for licensing, ordering, receiving and maintaining the Libraries’ extensive collection of e-serials. Overseeing the answering of user e-journal reports and... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Best Practices for Demand-Driven Acquisition of Monographs: Preliminary Recommendations of the NISO Working Group
Since Summer 2012, a National Information Standards Organization (NISO) working group has been developing a recommended practice regarding Demand-Driven Acquisition. This group, consisting of librarians, publishers, e-book aggregators, and approval and ILS vendors, has gathered feedback through surveys, interviews, and focus groups, and will present draft recommendations and ask for audience reactions.

The working group plans to release a final report in Spring 2014. This session will provide a crucial opportunity for stakeholders to respond to preliminary findings of the group, including detailed results of its recent international survey of stakeholders about DDA practices and opinions.  The report will include recommendations on:

  • Best practices for populating and managing the pool of titles under consideration for potential purchase, including methods for automated updating and removal of discovery records;
  • Development of consistent models for the three basic aspects of e-book DDA – free discovery to prevent inadvertent transactions, temporary lease, and purchase – that work for publishers and libraries;
  • Methods for managing DDA of multiple formats; and
  • Models and strategies for measuring and predicting use.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
BK

Barbara Kawecki

Director of Sales, Western US, YBP Library Services
Barbara Kawecki, Director of Sales, Western U.S., is responsible for the management and growth of YBP business throughout the western U.S. Barbara has more than 23 years of experience selling information products and services into the academic library market. She has served at YBP as Senior Digital Content Sales Manager in the Western U.S. from 2010 to 2013 and prior to that worked as a Senior Collection Development Manager in the same... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Collection Development Policies for the 21st Century Academic Library: Creating a New Model
Collection development policies in academic libraries have traditionally addressed scope and depth of subject; which languages, geographic regions, and time periods are covered; and what formats and material types are included. However, academic library collections increasingly face new challenges that these issues do not always address. These include shrinking budgets for collections and personnel, new modes of publication and distribution of content, repurposing of library spaces to focus on users rather than physical collections, and the transition to the digital library. Future collection development policies must address emerging trends use-driven acquisition and acquisition on demand, open access, emerging models of digital publishing, big science, data curation and mining, diversity issues, interdisciplinary research and teaching, and platform-agnostic content delivery. This session will demonstrate how libraries can create standards for designing collection development policies that address these issues. The presenters will engage the audience in creating model collection development policies by identifying rubrics and guidelines that are relevant to the current and future needs of their audiences. The audience will take away templates for authoring collection development policy statements that can be customized for individual libraries, collection areas, and disciplines.

Speakers
SA

Steve Alleman

Head of Collections, University of Missouri - Kansas City
avatar for Daniel C. Mack

Daniel C. Mack

Associate Dean, Collection Strategies & Services, University of Maryland
Daniel C. Mack is Associate Dean for Collection Strategies and Services, University Libraries at the University of Maryland Libraries in College Park, where he provides leadership in policy creation and implementation, strategic planning, program development, and assessment for library collections. His previous positions include Tombros Librarian for Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies and Head of the Arts and Humanities Library at Penn... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Database Design and Business Resources
With the rise of the Web, deep data mining from international resources is taking place. Compiling and accessing the data is one thing, but designing databases that allow users to easily identify economic, cultural, and sociological trends in the larger business world-wide requires the talents of veteran designers. This panel discussion will explore the variety of electronic data now available and what design considerations are necessary to harness the data for optimal use. Participating will be Roger Press of Academic Charts Online, a representative from Billboard magazine, Mike Phillips (a reference and ILL librarian at the College of Charleston), and colleagues from Naxos and IMF.

Speakers
RF

Randall Foster

Director of Licensing & Business Development, Naxos
Director of Licensing and Business Development for Naxos, the World's Leading Classical Record Label. more info at naxoslicensing.com and personally at RandallFoster.net
GM

Gareth McGuinness

Section Chief, Data Warehouse and Dissemination Statistics Department, International Monetary Fund
CM

C. Michael Phillips

Assistant Head of Reference/Interlibrary Loan Coordinator, College of Charleston, Addlestone Library
C. Michael Phillips, MLS and MM piano performance, is Assistant Head of Reference/Interlibrary Loan Coordinator at the College of Charleston’s Addlestone Library. He has held that position since 1990 and non-library administrative positions on campus over the years as well, including Associate Dean of LCWA, the School of Languages Cultures and World Affairs, and most currently Director of Summer Sessions. His research interests include... Read More →
RP

Roger Press

Academic Charts Online


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Digital Preservation of Library Content at Scale: An Evolution from Outlier to Mainstream
A brief history of electronic journal preservation must include the Stanford Libraries based LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) project and its publisher/library controlled spin-off CLOCKSS (Controlled Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe), the Ithaka delivered Portico digital preservation service, and, for some content, the Internet Archive and Private LOCKSS Networks such as the MetaArchive Cooperative and the COPPUL network of western Canada. Recent years have seen at least three other digital preservation networks evolving from multi-institutional partnerships which seek to provide broad-based digital preservation services at a regional or national level: the HathiTrust Digital Library (primarily focused on monographs, and now including government documents); the Digital Preservation Network (DPN); and one of its larger partner hubs, the Academic Preservation Trust (APTrust).

While these more recent partnerships may or may not focus on preservation of electronic journal content, many libraries that are currently using preservation services within their own institutions (LOCKSS or private LOCKSS networks) are expected to utilize DPN and APTrust services to provide further long-term preservation services for their content. Additionally, it is already clear that the HathiTrust Digital Library is becoming a massive repository for digital publications of the U.S. Government. Thus after more than a decade of existence of the LOCKSS program and Portico, a critical problem still exists: the scale by which universities and their libraries and archives are working to provide digital curation services both for electronic journal content and for other forms of content that are unique to an individual institution. This could include but is not limited to: institutional repository content, digital collections, and other forms of media and digital content. In this session the presenters will consider the models presented by LOCKSS, Portico, DPN, APTrust, HathiTrust and others while reviewing both long-term and short-term options for empowering libraries to better curate and preserve their licensed, published, and owned digital content.

Speakers
avatar for Robert McDonald

Robert McDonald

Associate Dean for Research & Technology Strategies, Indiana University
As the Associate Dean for Research and Technology Strategies, Robert H. McDonald works to provide library information system services and discovery services to the entire IU system and manages projects related to scholarly communications, new model publishing, and technologies that enable the Libraries to support teaching and learning for the IU Bloomington campus. In his role as Deputy Director of the Data to Insight Center, he works on new... Read More →
JS

Julie Speer

Associate Dean for Research and Informatics, Virginia Tech
avatar for Tyler Walters

Tyler Walters

Dean, University Libraries, and Professor, Virginia Tech
Tyler Walters is Dean, University Libraries and Professor, Virginia Tech. He is a 2009-10 Research Libraries Leadership Fellow of the Association of Research Libraries. Walters serves on the board of directors of DuraSpace, the Educopia Institute, and is a governing board member of the Academic Preservation Trust. He is a co-founder of the Library Publishing Coalition and has previously served on the steering committee of the Coalition of... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Discovery of eBooks and Media - What Will It Take?
Data indicating that half of print book collections were never checked out is increasing interest in PDA/DDA programs to ensure that a book selected at point of discovery will have at least one user. Discovery of print books is supported by browsing the stacks, yet today print and eBooks lack the rich descriptive data and indexing that has facilitated use of online journals. In streaming video, demand for PDA/DDA is also on the rise, yet discovery mechanisms face similar challenges. What is necessary for books and media to enjoy a comparable level of use by reaching their core community and the long tail? How is the data for book and media discovery for use different than that required for acquisitions decisions? How can publishers and libraries better collaborate to support the library workflow from selection to discovery and use? Join a discussion to expand our thinking about how to realize the value of the entire collection.

Moderators
avatar for Suzanne Saskia Kemperman

Suzanne Saskia Kemperman

Director of Business Development and Publisher Relations, OCLC, Director, Business Development and Publisher Relations
Suzanne Kemperman is the Director of Business Development and Publisher Relations at OCLC. She is responsible for OCLC's content acquisition strategy and partnerships with content providers to enhance content discovery and access. She has worked for 30 years in the publishing and information industry in Europe and the United States, including STM, academic and educational publishing. Suzanne began working in electronic publishing at Springer in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Bob Boissy

Bob Boissy

Director, Institutional Marketing and Account Development, Springer Nature
Bob spent the last 10 years in a variety of sales and marketing jobs for Springer, and the 15 years before that working in technical support and data exchange operations for a subscription agent. Bob is former Chair of the International Committee for EDI for Serials, and Past President of NASIG. Current work includes carefully monitoring usage of electronic resources for academic clients in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region, and working on... Read More →
JL

John Lenahan

Associate Vice President, Institutional Participation and Strategic Partnerships, Outreach and Participation, Ithaka
avatar for Carlen Ruschoff

Carlen Ruschoff

Director of Technical Services & Strategic Initiat, University of Maryland
Carlen Ruschoff is Director of Technical Services & Strategic Initiatives at the University of Maryland, College Park. Over a span of 35 years, she has held various positions in Technical Services and Information Technology. Carlen’s aspiration throughout her career has been to maximize the use automated processes in Libraries to free up staff to focus on new priorities. She is active in the library profession and has served in... Read More →
AW

Aaron Wood

VP, Systems and Data Architecture, Alexander Street Press


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Full Service/Full Circle: Initial Efforts Bear Fruit
Seton Hall University instructional librarians will discuss their success in revising the first-year English curriculum to include a rigorous information literacy component, wrought largely by their changing the dynamics of the librarian-teaching faculty relationship. In the past, we tried several approaches to engage freshmen in information literacy instruction, including point-of-need instruction, comprehensive introductions to library resources, and the presence of embedded librarians in our Blackboard course module. Although these methods have yielded some success, we have been frustrated by students’ lack of retention of the information taught in these courses. We will discuss how our research and praxis have led us to conclude that information literacy must be imparted by the teaching faculty themselves and that, in order to be effective, information literacy must constitute an important part of the first year reading and writing syllabus. We will talk about the process we used to effect change: the revision of a university wide core curriculum that identified information literacy as an essential core skill for undergraduates, the on-line workshops we held for teaching faculty who were interested in improving their information literacy instructional skills, the impact our Google grant (reported on last year at Charleston) has had on our collaborative efforts with the teaching faculty, the decision by the English faculty to revise the first-year curriculum to focus on the NJLA Information Literacy Standards, and finally, the assessment that a joint team of library and English faculty have begun this year that will measure the information literacy skills of the entire freshman class.We will then engage attendees in a lively discussion about their experiences engaging with teaching faculty. With this discussion, we hope to help facilitate those partnerships.

Speakers
BB

Beth Bloom

Instruction Librarian and Associate Professor, Seton Hall University
Beth Bloom, Associate Professor/Librarian II, at Seton Hall University,has an MA in Musicology, in addition to her MLS. She is liaison to the departments of art, music, women’s studies, nursing, and various health sciences. She coordinates Bibliographic Instruction and is a co-recipient of various grants, including a $15,000 Google grant that focuses on students' on-line research behaviors. She has also helped establish information literacy... Read More →
avatar for Marta Deyrup

Marta Deyrup

Librarian and Professor, Seton Hall University
Marta Deyrup is Professor and Head of Technical Services at Seton Hall University Libraries in South Orange, New Jersey. She holds a MLS from Rutgers University and a PhD from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Columbia University.


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Investing in Open Access, Innovating in Open Science – the NPG and UC Perspectives
This session will use the negotiations between the University of California and Nature Publishing Group as a springboard to look at the changes taking place in scholarly communication in the last decade.  The well-publicized dispute between UC and NPG in 2010 was one inflection point among many in the evolution of approaches to scholarly communication on the part of both libraries and publishers.  A review of NPG’s evolution over the past ten years will in part serve as an update to Annette Thomas’ keynote presentation at last year’s Charleston conference by describing NPG’s efforts to explore questions of impact, value, access and reuse, open access (OA), social tools and text and data mining, culminating with the recent investment in Frontiers Media, a community-driven, open-access publisher with novel approaches to peer review and networking. The University of California has similarly long been engaged in driving change in scholarly communication, including the development of its eScholarship publishing and repository platform, tools for data management and curation, efforts to leverage licensing relationships with publishers to effect transformation, and perhaps most importantly, the passionate engagement of its faculty in fostering new modes of scholarly publishing and access, culminating in the recent adoption of a systemwide faculty open access policy. Topics will include: measures of impact; the relevance of green and gold OA policies and experiences of introducing ‘hybrid’ OA options; Creative Commons licensing and CC-BY uptake; data management and curation; and licensing and services for text and data mining including linked data. The session will also provide insights into how both libraries and publishers are creating future opportunities for science and scientists and contributing to open scholarship. The objective of the session is to illustrate how all of these players are responding to new dynamics in scholarly publishing, with a goal of sustainability on the one hand, and innovation on the other. Audience participation will be encouraged throughout, with a full and frank discussion about the realities of library-publisher relations. Led by David Hoole and Ivy Anderson, who have worked at their respective organizations throughout this transformative decade.  

Speakers
avatar for Ivy Anderson

Ivy Anderson

Director, Collection Development & Management, California Digital Library
Ivy Anderson is the Director of Collection Development and Management at the California Digital Library (CDL), where she oversees a broad range of shared collections activities on behalf of the ten campuses of the University of California system.   Ivy was co-Principal Investigator on the Pay It Forward project, an investigation into the feasibility of a largescale shift of the journal literature to open access for North American... Read More →
DH

David Hoole

Director of Content Licensing, Nature Publishing Group


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Managing Journals by Committee
What do you do when your serials librarian retires and there’s no option to hire a replacement? You form a committee. When the University of Cincinnati Health Sciences serials librarian retired in early 2010, budget cuts required that the position be eliminated from the personnel lines. While other aspects of her position could be redistributed, rather than reassign another librarian to manage the collection development tasks, the library director decided to pool the responsibilities for serials selection, faculty contact, subscription termination, and all other tasks relative to serials collection maintenance. With varying knowledge of journal management, the committee of five (the director, two information services librarians, one informationist and a technical services librarian) has worked as a team through journal cancellations, continued format switches, and new acquisitions for three years.

Over those three years, we have systematically addressed new requests, budget impact, journal usage, the balance between clinical versus research faculty requests, and a significant change in our user mix that continues to inform us that no matter the number of journals in our collections, if the desired journal title is not among them, there are not have enough journals.
This paper will describe the myriad challenges, changes, and lessons learned plus our successes and a few missteps along the way during the last three years of managing the UC Health Sciences Library journal collection by committee. Audience interaction will include polling throughout the presentation.

Speakers
SP

Sharon Purtee

Technical Services Librarian, University of Cincinnati Health Sciences Library
ES

Edith Starbuck

Information Services Librarian, University of Cincinnati Health Sciences Library


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Proving the Value of Library Collections Part II: An Interdisciplinary Study Using Citation Analysis
At the 2012 Charleston Conference, University of Kansas (KU) librarians presented the results of a citation analysis project conducted using faculty publications in the sciences. During the subsequent year, KU librarians took the collection assessment project two steps further by gathering citation data from faculty publications in the humanities and social sciences to conduct an extensive citation analysis.

Using a random sampling of faculty publications from three departments in the humanities-philosophy, art history, and English, and three departments in the social sciences-psychology, political science, and economics, the presenters conducted a citation analysis of the resources cited in faculty journal publications. The librarians used this new data to compare the two broad disciplinary areas with the sciences, but even more importantly, they collected data that would influence collection development decisions in the individual subject areas.

The presenters tested their assumptions, expecting to find that science faculty use more journals than books and humanities faculty use more books than journals, but in some cases, the results were unexpected. KU librarians will share the analysis data for each department and discuss how they used the citation analysis to demonstrate the value of the library collections and inform collection development decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Lea Currie

Lea Currie

Head of Content Development, University of Kansas Libraries
Lea Currie has been the head of Content Development at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008 and employed with the Libraries in other positions since 1999. Lea’s principal role in her current position is to manage the collection development budget, review and analyze collections, and coordinate collection development projects.
avatar for Amalia Monroe-Gulick

Amalia Monroe-Gulick

Content Development and Collections Assessment Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries
Amalia holds an MLS from Indiana University, as well as a BS and MS in political science from Illinois State University. She has worked at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008.


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Questions about Academic Librarians
This paper presents the results of a survey inquiry into professional identity, roles (current and expected), views on faculty status and tenure and personnel status of academic librarians in the New England area. Forty-five percent of the participants have some combination of faculty status, tenure status, and faculty plus tenure status. Their professional identities are closely matched with their primary roles and responsibilities. Librarians’ current and expected roles are expanding. Four new and emerging roles of ‘educator,’ ‘teacher,’ ‘information professional,’ and ‘facilitator of learning’ revealed significant differences across personnel status. While all academic librarians perceive strong professional development support, only those librarians with faculty status and tenure or tenure status only and professional identity associated with new and emerging areas see more career advancement and development opportunities.

Speakers
SF

Shin Freedman

Head of Acquisitions & Serials, Framingham State University


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Parkview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Saying Goodbye to the “Electronic Resources” Fund: Restructuring the Library Budget for the Age of e-Resources.
The literature and discussion regarding library budgets usually focusses on methods and formulas for allocating funds among the different subject areas. However, little attention is being paid to the structure of the funds within those subject areas. This presentation will introduce new concepts and a new way of thinking about the Library budget as more than just a way of spending funds, but also as a tool for planning and reporting, for both management and selectors.

Many academic libraries still have the very general and all-embracing “electronic resources” fund. Having one big pot of money to pay for both one time purchases and ongoing subscriptions to all types of electronic resources certainly provides some flexibility in spending, but is not helpful for planning or statistics reporting. Moreover, paying for one-time e-book purchases in the same fund as constantly rising e-journal subscriptions is misleading and may contribute to the (actual or perceived) drain of funds away from monographs.

The Claremont Colleges Library’s budget is based on broader disciplines, rather than on subjects. This enables the Library to maintain a fund structure that addresses the three critical aspects of library expenditures in an e-resource dominated world: material type (books, journals, non-journal databases, and media), material format (print/physical or electronic), and order type - an aspect reflecting the nature of the spending – ongoing vs. one-time purchases vs. approval plan autoship vs. standing orders.

The advantages of the new budget structure are numerous: from more accurate tracking of increases in ongoing expenses and facilitating annual reporting for associations’ statistics to better control over budget expenditure throughout the year and helping collections librarians focus on planning for spending the funds that need librarian intervention while just monitoring funds “that spend themselves” - subscriptions, autoship, or standing orders.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Savova

Maria Savova

Director of Inforation Resources and Systems, Claremont University Consortium
Maria oversees the Library's Materials budget and has broad responsibilities for leading the library’s strategy in funding, selecting, and managing information resources for the Claremont Colleges’ user community. She is also responsible for developing innovative, user-centered, customized approaches to acquiring information resources and facilitating their discovery by users.


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Spring Cleaning: Easy Ways to Tidy your Customer Data
October Ivins (slides)

In this practical session for publishers and intermediaries, we will discuss the importance of clean and standardized customer data, and offer concrete, simple take-aways for those wishing to implement some first steps towards improvement of customer data health. While one of the main goals of cleaner data is to improve service to subscribers, it can also benefit organizations internally: it ensures accuracy in reporting, and minimizes time spent on inquiries. Attendees will be asked to share their experiences with good or poor data, typical pain points, and discuss the practicality of solutions.

Speakers
avatar for October Ivins

October Ivins

Principal and Consultant, Ivins eContent Solutions
October was an academic librarian for 20 years at UNC and LSU, and was an executive at two Boston area publishing services dot coms.  She is an independent consultant to publishers and other content providers, associations, libraries, and consortia.  Projects typically include market research, product and license development, pricing, and/or marketing strategy.  She earned both BA and MLS degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill and completed PhD coursework... Read More →
avatar for Christine Orr

Christine Orr

Sales Director, Ringgold Inc.
Christine has spent more than 20 years in STM publishing with both commercial houses and not-for-profit societies; she now helps publishers and intermediaries make better business decisions and support their customers using Ringgold’s standards-based data. While on the publishing side of the industry, she gained extensive experience developing marketing and sales campaigns for legacy journals and their companion online editions, negotiating... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Triangle Research Libraries Network Oxford University Press Pilot: An Evolving Model for Consortial Print and E-Books Collections
The Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) and Oxford University Press (OUP) are continuing their pilot to create a financially sustainable model for consortial acquisition e-books coupled with needed shared print copies in cooperation wit YBP Library Services (YBP). The project expands acquisitions of e-books in tandem with reductions in print, so as to move both the consortium and the university presses to a decidedly electronic environment for books that will enhance support for instruction and research across the disciplinary spectrum within an environment that is acceptable to users. This presentation will report on the challenges and lessons learned in Year 1, librarian and patron reactions to this format shift, and the resulting philosophical and practical evolutions in TRLN’s approaches to monographic acquisitions generally and understandings of what constitutes cooperative success specifically. Presenters also will discuss how this knowledge has changed understandings about vending and acquiring e-books and their relationship to print and what have been the implications of these experiences for making changes in Year 2 and envisioning how the pilot would become a permanent venture.

Speakers
avatar for Ann-Marie Breaux

Ann-Marie Breaux

Vice President, Academic Service Integration, YBP Library Services
Ann-Marie Breaux works for YBP Library Services, developing and implementing technical and workflow services for customers. Based in Woodstock, Georgia, Ann-Marie has worked for YBP since 1997. Prior to that, she worked in a variety of acquisitions and cataloging positions for Lamont and Hilles undergraduate libraries at Harvard. Ann-Marie has an AB from Harvard University and an MLS from Simmons College.
avatar for Lisa Croucher

Lisa Croucher

Program Officer, Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN)
TG

Teddy Gray

Head of Acquisitions, Duke University Libraries
CJ

Cotina Jones

Assistant Director of Library Services, North Carolina Central University Library
Cotina Jones has over fifteen years experience in libraries (academic, public, and school).  In her current role she serves as a supervisor to reference and instruction librarians.  Cotina is also involved as a member of two TRLN committees, the Collections Council and Human Resources Council.  Presently, she is a doctoral student at North Carolina A & T State University, in Leadership Studies.
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Senior Director, Institutional Sales, Americas, Oxford University Press
Rebecca Seger is the Senior Director for Institutional Sales at Oxford University Press USA.  She has been working with libraries for her entire career, currently leading the OUP team that works with, and sells, to all types of libraries and consortia in North and South America.  Rebecca has been with OUP for 14 years, and has focused on the product development, sales and marketing of ebooks, databases and journals to and for the academic and... Read More →
LS

Luke Swindler

Collections Management Officer, Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Luke Swindler has been working in collections for over three decades. In his current position he has a leading role in analyzing, planning, and managing library collections generally and spearheading e-books initiatives specifically for the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Using the Past to Chart the Future: Evaluating Top Circulating Print Books by Subject and Publisher to Inform Future E-Book Purchases

Libraries and library consortia are buying increasing numbers of e-books through a variety of acquisition models, and analysis of previous usage can be used to help make these purchases more effective and targeted.  This session provides two perspectives – a consortium of 73 academic libraries and an individual academic library – and gives practical examples of how this approach can be implemented.

The Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA) consortium used a pilot Publisher/Subject Collection Analysis to explore ways to use print circulation data to inform future, collaborative e-book purchases.  An important consideration was defining “high circulating” books in a way that allowed member libraries of all sizes to participate, and central to this analysis was distillation and normalization of the data.  Libraries provided the ISBN, call number, and total number of circulations, among other data items, to the VIVA central office, which used the ISBN to generate normalized publisher names.  Initial results of the analysis have provided easy drilling down to show top publishers for a given subject area.

In a similar vein, American University Library has analyzed historical approval orders to identify which publishers may be the best fits to be removed from the approval plan and changed to package and frontlist purchases made directly from the publisher.  Benefits of this approach include more comprehensive coverage of a publisher’s titles and easier tracking of cost per publisher.  Circulation data for the books was used as a prioritization mechanism, and purchases have already been made using this method.

Attendees will learn the procedures for doing collection analyses of this kind, including the process of mapping ISBNs to publishers and the scripts used to process the data efficiently for the VIVA project.  A discussion with the audience will follow the presentation.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Matos

Michael Matos

Business Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Information Technology, American University
Michael A. Matos is the Business Librarian and Adjunct Professor of Information Technology at American University in Washington, DC. Michael also serves as the Vice-Chair of American University Library's Collection Management Team. He has worked on numerous collection assessment projects. Michael has a Master's in Library Science from Florida State University and has worked in the libraries of Florida State University, Georgetown University... Read More →
avatar for Anne Osterman

Anne Osterman

VIVA Director, VIVA - The Virtual Library of Virginia
Anne Osterman is a librarian with over ten years of experience in academic libraries. She has worked in a variety of roles, including research data services, reference and instruction, acquisitions, and the licensing of electronic resources. She is currently Director of the Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA), the consortium of nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia. Anne holds a Master's degree in Library Science from... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am

Will It Blend? A Practical Approach to Evaluating the Big Deal
This presentation will describe a new approach to evaluating Big Deal packages. This approach enables librarians to negotiate with publishers more effectively by comparing the cost per download of package titles with the expected cost per download of competing publishers’ titles currently provided through interlibrary loan. The element of competition compensates for the effect of inflated journal list prices and, in some cases, will show that a Big Deal package is not the most cost effective way to provide access to articles. The model and user guide described in the presentation will be made available for other libraries to use.

The model uses a publisher’s list price and JR1 data for all titles within a package to sort titles by cost per download. Additionally, the model combines a library’s interlibrary loan data with journal title list prices to produce an equivalent list of titles from a variety of publishers. These two lists are combined with additional data which reflects each library’s individual circumstance, including budget, usage inflation, and interlibrary loan costs.

The resulting output is a blended list of package titles and individual titles from other publishers to which the library could afford subscriptions as an alternative to the package deal, while maintaining a sufficient budget to provide all non-subscribed material through interlibrary loan.

The presentation will be in the form of a case study which describes the model developed by California Polytechnic State University (San Luis Obispo) for use by the California State University system in their current negotiations with publishers. This model improves upon work conducted by David Beales (formerly at Imperial College London) and used by the Research Libraries UK (RLUK) consortium in their successful negotiations with Elsevier and Wiley Blackwell.

Speakers
avatar for David Beales

David Beales

Engineering Librarian, California Polytechnic State University
avatar for Nikki DeMoville

Nikki DeMoville

Electronic Resources Coordinator, California Polytechnic State University
Nikki DeMoville is the Electronic Resources Coordinator at Robert E. Kennedy Library, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. She has worked with serials for the past 25 years, and electronic resources for the last 8 years. She is a graduate of the School of Library and Information Studies at The University of Alabama.


Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:30pm

A Guided Tour of Issues and Trends (The 13th Annual Health Sciences Lively Lunch)
Handout

Slides from Deborah Blecic 


In this year's sponsored but no holds barred lunch, the conference theme, "Too much is not enough", resonates. Lunch host, Wendy Bahnsen from Rittenhouse, will offer a brief greeting, and Ramune Kubilius will provide the traditional “year in review” synopsis. Moderator Andrea Twiss-Brooks will set the scene, provide a brief introduction to issues of current interest in the health sciences information arena, and will introduce the speakers. The discussants will then guide participants on a tour that will feature short updates and ideas on different topics. After each presentation, a "rest stop" will allow for discussion by all participants, before the session moves on to the next theme. Topics will include: methods of measurement of health sciences journal use (Deborah Blecic); shared collection development and policies (Elizabeth Ketterman); scholarly communication activities in health sciences libraries (Robin Champieux); current challenges, trials, pitfalls and successes of ebooks in the health sciences (Anneliese Taylor); provision of information resources for basic scientists (Marysue Schaffer). Though every attempt will be made to bring each other up to date, too much discussion on these and related topics can never be enough!

Speakers
avatar for @dearbeth

@dearbeth

Assistant Director for Collections, East Carolina University
avatar for Deborah  Blecic

Deborah Blecic

Collections Coordinator, University of Illinois at Chicago
Deb has been at UIC since 1991.  She is a Distinguished Member of the Medical Library Association’s Academy of Health Information Professionals and won the 2005 Louise Darling Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development in the Health Sciences. She is the author of 15 peer-reviewed journal articles and numerous other publications and presentations. Deb’s current research focuses on the use of electronic resources.  Deb... Read More →
avatar for Robin Champieux, MLIS

Robin Champieux, MLIS

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University
Robin Champieux is the Scholarly Communication Librarian at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon.  She leads efforts that contribute to the pace and impact of scholarly communication by partnering with OHSU research, teaching, and student communities on issues relating to publication, public access, data sharing, and scientific contribution.  Robin is the co-founder of Advancing Research Communication &... Read More →
RK

Ramune K. Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University, Galter Health Sciences Library
Longtime health sciences librarian, member of MLA (Medical Library Association), SLA (Special Libraries Association), also regional and state health sciences library organizations. Involved with Charleston Conference as a program director, conference dine-around host, and recruiter/compiler of conference session “And They Were There” reports for “Against the Grain” (ATG). Active in organizing conference's health sciences Lively Lunches... Read More →
avatar for Marysue Schaffer

Marysue Schaffer

Associate Director, Collection Management Bernard Becker Medical Library, Becker Medical Library, Washington University in St. Louis
avatar for Anneliese Taylor

Anneliese Taylor

Assistant Director, Scholarly Communications & Collections, University of California, San Francisco Library
Anneliese leads scholarly communication activities and oversees collection development and technical services at the UCSF Library. She earned her MLIS at the University of Texas @ Austin, and is passionate about transformation in scholarly publishing.
avatar for Andrea Twiss-Brooks

Andrea Twiss-Brooks

Director of Research and Teaching Support, University of Chicago


Friday November 8, 2013 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Are Midsize Academic Libraries on the Right E-Book Train?
Librarians and their vendors are invited to a lively lunch discussion of the fate of books in midsize academic libraries. Do the monograph acquisition models advocated by R-1 librarians at recent Charleston Conferences fit the needs of midsize academic libraries? These radical new models appear to assume almost full migration to e-books and include such strategies as wholesale movement to e-book only approval; large leased e-book packages; and expansive DDA offerings of e-books in the catalog. Should midsize academic libraries--which are more often faced with unpredictable budget cycles, limited resources, and a different set of priorities—follow the R-1s’ lead or should they find monograph acquisition models better suited their needs? Participants will have the opportunity to explore these issues with the moderators’ guidance and to offer ideas on blending the best of the emerging R-1 models with the differing needs of midsize academic libraries.

Speakers
avatar for John P. Abbott

John P. Abbott

Coordinator, Collection Management, Appalachian State University
John Abbott is Coordinator of Collection Management @ Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.  He previously served as North Carolina State University’s Associate Head of Collection Management with responsibilities for life sciences/agriculture, and as Texas A&M University’s Agriculture Librarian.  Before librarianship, he was a field biologist mapping vegetation in Utah and New Mexico and live-trapping deer and elk: all good... Read More →
avatar for Allan Scherlen

Allan Scherlen

Social Sciences Librarian, Appalachian State University
Allan Scherlen is the collections management librarian for the social sciences at Appalachian State University, Boone, NC. Allan has published articles on various issues related to publishing, open access, and international librarianship in International Information and Library Review, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, Serials Review, Serials Librarian, Public Libraries, and North Carolina Libraries. He was also the co-editor of the... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Changing Operations of Academic Libraries
Allen McKiel (slides)

The session is an exploration of library operational adaptations to the changing technologies of information distribution and usage. The librarians will present glimpses of the changes occurring in their library operations as they transition to services without print. The cadence of change particularly with respect to e-books continues to accelerate. The moderator will summarize some of the technology changes of the last year and a panel of librarians will explore, through the evidence of their changing library operations, a range of topics including: trends in e-book ‘acquisition’ and usage; developments in open access publishing; changes in consortia; and the role of librarians in instruction and evolving peer review and publication processes. After initial presentations, the panel and moderator will encourage questions, comments, and discussion with attendees.

Speakers
JD

Jim Dooley

Head, Collection Services, University of California, Merced
Jim Dooley has been head of collections and technical services at the University of California, Merced since 2003.  Prior to coming to UC Merced he held a variety of positions in technical services and special collections at the University of Utah.  He serves on various University of California systemwide committees including collections licensing, shared print and cataloging and metadata services.  He has presented at previous... Read More →
avatar for Allen McKiel

Allen McKiel

Dean of Library Services, Western Oregon University
Allen McKiel began his career as a programmer/systems analyst. The merger of his technical skills with librarianship occurred at OCLC and NOTIS. He has over twenty years of academic library experience first as the Director of Libraries for Region 2 of Indiana’s Ivy Tech Community College, then as the Director of Libraries for Northeastern State University in Oklahoma, and currently as Dean of Library Services for Western Oregon University.
avatar for Robert Murdoch

Robert Murdoch

Associate University Librarian for Collection Development & Technical Services, Brigham Young University
avatar for Dinesh Siddaiah

Dinesh Siddaiah

Deputy Librarian, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar
Dr. Dinesh K. S. is working as a Deputy Librarian in Indian Institute of Technology Ropar. Prior to this he worked as a Selection Grade Librarian in Nagarjuna College of Engineering & Technology, Bangalore. Overall he has got 15 years of experience in Library and Information Management. He is well proficient in managing print and electronic library. He is strong in library automation, content management, digital library, developing IR. He has... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Collection Development in the Network World: Where Do Libraries Add Value?
Libraries around the world present their mission as providing access to information. However, Google’s stated mission is “to organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful”, so librarians arguably need to think again about their distinctive contribution in the information arena. In 2003, the SLA asserted that “Information professionals have expertise in total management of information resources,” but other professions now claim competence in information management, indicating that we must identify more clearly the value added by real information pros.

Libraries have traditionally been defined and evaluated by their collections, but the processes and products of collection development have been transformed by social, technological, economic, and political forces. Automation of operations, outsourcing of functions, digitization of content, aggregation of purchases, and empowerment of users have altered the work of library practitioners. Responsibility for description and classification has migrated to the network, while storage and usage have moved off-site. Pundits argue that selection is the definitive professional task for librarians in the digital world, enabling us to give our communities trusted, quality-assured resources; yet big deals, publisher bundles, patron-driven acquisitions, and the participatory library, are all challenging this vision. Others see changes in research and publishing as a chance to extend library roles upstream and downstream in the data-information-knowledge continuum.

The objective of the session is to define the value created by libraries and librarians in 21st century collection development and access management. The presenter will use different models of the collection management and scholarly communication lifecycles and examples from contemporary professional practice to explore the central question with members of the audience, who will be invited to share their thoughts and record their opinions throughout the session. The proposed collaborative inquiry will expose participants to diverse perspectives on the problem and yield new insights into professional competence.

Speakers
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004, she became Professor of Library & Information Management at the University of Sheffield, then head of the Sheffield iSchool, before moving to the US in 2012 to lead... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Coming Clean About Dirty OCR: Providing Primary-Source Text to Scholarly Users
Early primary-source electronic text collections were produced by manual input and proofreading, resulting in accurate but costly and slow-growing content. Keyed content is still found in many databases, but today’s abundant supply of online historic primary source data is largely the result of computerized optical character recognition (OCR), with some quality control but no painstaking proofreading (hence the name “dirty OCR.”) Recently, the growth of archival manuscript material online has introduced a new large body of text that could be made searchable only by keyboarding and is usually presented as page image only. Thus, we are confronted today with a vast but varied body of material, the predominant form probably being “dirty OCR” presented on-screen as searchable text hidden behind a page image. Since the underlying text is not completely accurate, multiple tools, including fuzzy searching, rich metadata, and detailed user guides are provided to enhance retrieval.

Approaches to helping users navigate, interpret, and access the frequently enormous results of a search also vary significantly. Almost universally, though, underlying “dirty OCR” is rarely displayed or downloadable, probably to avoid shocking the uninitiated with its unruly appearance. This lack of clarity and consistency presents a serious challenge to students and researchers, however, whether that be a naïve user unaware of differences in the texts she or he is addressing (and hence unable to formulate the best search strategy) or a cutting-edge digital humanities scholar who wants to combine and manipulate resources from different databases in an advanced project.

The speakers will address these issues in greater detail, survey the state of play among the major online primary source providers today, and suggest a set of best practices. Attendees will be asked to share their experiences teaching and using historical-text databases and to provide their input regarding the proposed best-practice model.

Speakers
BS

Bob Scott

Digital Humanities Librarian, Columbia University
JT

John Tofanelli

Librarian for British & American History & Literature, Columbia University Libraries


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Creating a New Collections Allocation Model for These Changing Times: Challenges, Opportunities, and Data
Using Penn State as a case study, this presentation focuses on the development of a formula for use in allocating the collections budget and the questions that arose during the process. The Associate Dean for Collections, Information, and Access Services charged a Collections Allocation Team to examine the development and use of a collections allocation formula. The team used a variety of methods to guide the development of the formula including a literature review, a survey of ARL Chief Collection Development Officers, and discussions with fellow selectors within the University Libraries. In addition, the Team developed other recommendations related to the allocation of the collections budget, especially focusing on the process of collection development, the purchases of large packages that limit individual selector flexibility, the impact of PDA and ebook purchases, duplication of materials across the University Libraries, and the rewriting of collection development policies. Of primary concern, however, has been changing the attitudes and philosophy about collections among the librarians who are the primary selectors of materials, whether in the subject libraries or in the campus libraries. The objective of the session is to share our experiences in devising this formula and in attempting to instill a broader view of collections among our colleagues. It is hoped that attendees can learn more about the application of allocation formulas to their own institutions, but we also hope to learn from their experiences and their observations. Thus, this session seems well fit to a Lively Lunch Discussion so that the maximum audience participation can be encouraged.

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Crawford

Gregory Crawford

Director, PSH Library, Pennsylvania State University
LG

Lisa German

Associate Dean for Collections, Information and Access Services, Pennsylvania State University


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Facing Fears About Deselection and eBooks; Strategies to Help Both Faculty and Librarians Feel Safe
Caroline Mills (slides)

Ellen Daugman & Carol Cramer (slides)

A strongly perceived resistance to, even fear of, “forsaking” print resources exists in academic libraries. Research suggests that librarians frequently avoid major collection changes such as deselection or the switch from print to e-books because of assumed faculty opposition and the desire to avoid conflict. How can librarians face their fears and the fears and dismay of faculty as they see print collections shrink through deterioration and deselection and the growth of e-book collections? How do we identify, assess, and respond to resulting resistance? Participants in this session will have the opportunity to identify and acknowledge their own fears regarding the demise of print. Further, they will learn about strategies employed by institutions to identify and respond to these faculty fears resulting in the creation of a safe environment for strategic deselection and expansion of electronic collections. Finally, time will be reserved for questions and for the sharing of ideas, concerns, and support.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Cramer

Carol Cramer

Head of Collection Management, Wake Forest University
Carol Joyner Cramer is the Head of Collection Management at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University. Before tackling Collection Management, she worked in Reference and as an Electronic Resources Librarian. She has also taught a credit-bearing Information Literacy course to undergraduates. She has a BA in Comparative Area Studies from Duke University and an MSLS from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In her spare... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Daugman

Ellen Daugman

Humanities Librarian, Wake Forest University
As Humanities Librarian in Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Ellen serves as liaison to the English Department and the Interdisciplinary Humanities Program, reference librarian, and instructor in the library’s information literacy program, teaching credit-bearing introductory and humanities research courses. Prior to coming to Wake Forest, she was a reference librarian in Memorial Library at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has a BA in... Read More →
avatar for Caroline C Mills PhD

Caroline C Mills PhD

Assistant Director for Collection Services, Furman University
Caroline Mills has over 20 years of academic library experience serving most recently as Assistant Director for Collection Services at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. Caroline has a Masters in Information and Library Science from the University of South Carolina and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership, with a focus on assessment in higher education, from Clemson University. Her current area of research interest include consortial... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

High Noon at the Pricing Model Corral
How do publishers and other content providers decide what to charge for their products? How are the various business models constructed, and how are price points determined? Do more generous licensing terms mean higher prices? Is pricing an art or a science or both? Join us for a lively lunch with two pricing experts who will share their contrasting perspectives. The speakers will leave ample time for discussion and audience participation, so bring your questions and examples to the pricing model corral.

Rick Burke directs the SCELC consortium, which has 231 library members and affiliates, and licenses nearly 3500 eresources from 123 vendors. He has observed a variety of business models, and with his staff has created a sophisticated business management system that integrates individual library data with vendor models to calculate pricing for consortium members.

October Ivins was working on an LIS dissertation “How do publishers price econtent?” when she left a PhD program to work for a publishing service provider. As a consultant, she has helped create pricing models and price points for Project MUSE, the University of Virginia’s Rotunda imprint, Duke University Press’s ebooks package, the Modern Language Association, and others.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
avatar for October Ivins

October Ivins

Principal and Consultant, Ivins eContent Solutions
October was an academic librarian for 20 years at UNC and LSU, and was an executive at two Boston area publishing services dot coms.  She is an independent consultant to publishers and other content providers, associations, libraries, and consortia.  Projects typically include market research, product and license development, pricing, and/or marketing strategy.  She earned both BA and MLS degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill and completed PhD coursework... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Is There a Future for Collection Development Librarians?
With many academic libraries making use of approval plans and demand driven acquisitions (DDA) the traditional role of the Collection Development Librarian is changing and diminishing. But is this really true? I will describe the areas of collection building and management that still need to be carried out by a librarian. I will also identify those tasks that a Collection Development Librarian no longer needs to perform. Finally, I will consider the future direction of collection building in different types of academic libraries and will suggest new roles for the library in this process.

The objective of this session is to initiate a dialog about the role of collection development in the electronic age. Members of the audience will be encouraged to share practices and policies from their institutions and to brainstorm about new roles and responsibilities for librarians. Attendees will leave the session with a better understanding of current collection development practices and a stronger awareness of the central role a Collection Development Librarian can play.

Speakers
TK

Thomas Karel

Collection Management Librarian, Franklin & Marshall College
I have been an academic librarian for 37 years, working in reference, government documents, and collection development. Since 1995 I have also been an adjunct faculty member in Drexel University's library and information science program.


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Parkview Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Library Publishing Coalition Project: Discussion and Research Update

The Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) Project is a two year project with seed funding from the Educopia Institute to develop a community-defined and established Library Publishing Coalition to meet an urgent need within the information profession for more library publishing skill-building, professional development and networking opportunities, and virtual and in-person forums for sharing best practices and documentation.

In January 2013, the LPC Project, with support and participation from 51 member libraries, began working on a core set of activities defined by the community including:

1.  a directory of library publishing services, 
2.  new library publishing research projects, 
3.  timely training programs, 
4.  developing a charter and governance structure for the LPC, and 
5.  coordinating the first in-person Library Publishing Coalition Forum. 


Sarah Lippincott, LPC Program Manager, Educopia Institute, will present on the results of the recent library publishing services survey used to populate the forthcoming Directory of Library Publishing Services. Following Sarah's presentation, three Deans and Directors of member libraries will discuss the formation of the LPC, how they envision the future coalition supporting the development of publishing partnerships (especially with the complementary programs of university presses and scholarly societies), and their perspectives on the role of library publishing services in today's research and scholarly environment. 

The discussion will be followed by a question and answer period. In addition to learning about the results of the survey and hearing from different member libraries, participants can expect to be offered an opportunity to provide feedback on the kinds of services that would best meet the diverse needs of the library publishing community and to gain a better understanding of the broad range of LPC Project activities.


Speakers
avatar for Carol Pitts Diedrichs

Carol Pitts Diedrichs

Vice Provost and Director of University Libraries, The Ohio State University
Carol Pitts Diedrichs is Director of University Libraries at The Ohio State University. From 2003-2009, she served as Dean of Libraries, William T. Young Endowed Chair at the University of Kentucky. | | She is active in the American Library Association (ALA) and served as President of the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), in 2004-2005. For 13 years, she served as editor-in-chief of the journal, Library... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Lippincott

Sarah Lippincott

Program Director, Library Publishing Coalition
Library publishing, digital scholarship, library-university press collaboration
avatar for Sarah Pritchard

Sarah Pritchard

Dean of Libraries, Northwestern University
JS

Julie Speer

Associate Dean for Research and Informatics, Virginia Tech
avatar for Tyler Walters

Tyler Walters

Dean, University Libraries, and Professor, Virginia Tech
Tyler Walters is Dean, University Libraries and Professor, Virginia Tech. He is a 2009-10 Research Libraries Leadership Fellow of the Association of Research Libraries. Walters serves on the board of directors of DuraSpace, the Educopia Institute, and is a governing board member of the Academic Preservation Trust. He is a co-founder of the Library Publishing Coalition and has previously served on the steering committee of the Coalition of... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Meeting Their Demand: E-Book Purchasing from Consortial and Institutional Perspectives
Karen Wilhoit (slides)

“Beyond Demand-Driven: Incorporating Multiple Tools in a Consortial Collection Strategy”: For over 20 years, OhioLINK has been committed to sharing resources among member libraries. The emergence of e-books caused OhioLINK to re-evaluate its model for sharing access to resources: e-books purchased at an individual institution can’t typically be shared with other institutions. OhioLINK has purchased e-book collections directly from major publishers such as Springer and Oxford; however, that model does not fully meet our needs. Recognizing this, OhioLINK instituted a pilot project to acquire and share e-book content across the consortium. Incorporating multiple collecting strategies including e-book collections, e-book approval plans, and Demand-Driven Acquisitions (DDA) and using YBP as well as publisher and aggregator partners, the pilot processes can be integrated with collecting tools and strategies already in use across the state. We will outline the assumptions that underpin this project, the process of designing our model, challenges with implementation, and early results.

“Four Years of Unmediated Patron-Driven Acquisition and 5000 Ebooks Later: We Gave ‘Em What They Wanted”: As one of ebrary’s largest academic library DDA customers, the program at the University of Iowa Libraries has been highly successful, though not without challenges. This presentation will present detailed findings from analyzing Iowa’s demand-driven acquisition e-book usage data from over 5,000 titles purchased over four years, including examining subject areas, prices, publishers, and other relevant metrics. This presentation will serve as update to a popular session at Charleston in 2010 (Give ‘Em What They Want: Patron-Driven Collection Development), where Iowa presented data from a one-year pilot program. Now, with four years of experience under our belts, a lot more data, and over a half-million dollars spent from our coffers, Iowa will share what we have learned, gained, and changed as a result of our experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Barnes

Matt Barnes

Vice President of Product Marketing, ProQuest
Matt Barnes leads Product Marketing and strategic planning at ProQuest's ebook and software businesses. Matt is focused on ensuring ProQuest solutions help libraries deliver relevant content and services to library patrons in the most efficient and cost effective manner possible. | | Prior to joining ProQuest, Matt was a consultant at R2 Consulting specializing in selection to access workflow analysis in academic libraries. As part of R2, he... Read More →
avatar for Chris Diaz

Chris Diaz

Residency Librarian, Scholarly Communications and Collections, University of Iowa
I work with the Collection Management group at the University of Iowa Libraries. I divvy my time between collections analysis, electronic resources licensing, scholarly communications education, and institutional repository outreach. I am very much interested in open access for the humanities, funding structures for scientific research, institutional repository management, and copyright education.
avatar for Karen Fischer

Karen Fischer

Collections Strategist, University of Iowa
Karen Fischer is the Collections Strategist at the University of Iowa, where she has worked since 2003. Her position involves collections budget analysis, resource selection and analysis, and scholarly communication outreach. She guest teaches at UI’s School for Library and Information Science on scholarly communication and collection management topics, and is the editor of the journal Collection Management.
avatar for Karen Wilhoit

Karen Wilhoit

Associate University Librarian, Wright State University
avatar for Michael  Zeoli

Michael Zeoli

VP, eContent Development, YBP Library Services
YBP Library Services, 1997-current | ebrary, 2005-2007 | Regenstein Library, Acquisitions Dept., University of Chicago | http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/virtual_conferences/eternal_ebooks/


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Open Access Author Funds: A Problem or a Solution?
As the OA movement has burgeoned in many directions, the scholarly communications ecosystem has been put under the microscope. The question of payment for article publication charges has drawn much attention. Some schools have established funds to cover the costs, while others can’t afford to do so, or have decided to focus on other OA priorities and goals. This inevitably raises some fundamental questions, such as, What is the value and benefit of OA Author funds? What is the transformation that we are seeking to bring about, and are we succeeding or not? What is the role of the library in scholarly communications? What is the role of consortia? What are the competing perspectives on the purpose and use of such funds, from the researchers, the university administrators, the librarians, and others in the university community? What about publishers? This session will present opposing arguments on the pros and cons of OA Author Funds, in order to be a catalyst for a lively discussion with the audience on this complex issue. We will pose questions to the audience to engage the group in a conversation.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Horava

Tony Horava

AUL Collections, University of Ottawa
I've been involved in Collections work for many years, and have seen remarkable transformations over the years. The challenges around ebooks, licensing, budgets, consortial strategies, new forms of knowledge and scholarly communications spring to mind. Reading in the digital age fascinates me - it is such a sea-change. The Charleston Conference is always energizing. I look forward to connecting with many people and hearing new ideas and... Read More →
avatar for Denise Koufogiannakis

Denise Koufogiannakis

Collections and Acquisitions Coordinator, University of Alberta
I have worked at the University of Alberta since 2000, and have held my current position since 2005. I enjoy the constantly changing nature of overseeing collections activities in a large academic library. My main area of research is evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP), and I co-founded the open access, peer reviewed journal of the same name, which began publication in 2006.


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Rethinking Your Acquisitions
In an age of evolving collections, business models, and technologies, creative collection management and evaluation practices have been developed in response to institutional demands and emerging content options. Librarians strive to aggregate and deliver critical information by leveraging new and old technologies. Handling a hybrid collection in a landscape full of discovery options and dwindling budgets often inspires librarians to develop their own unique solutions. In some cases, these creative endeavors have often resulted in extra data entry and duplicate processes and achieving completeness has resulted in labor-intensive practices that cannot be sustained; understanding the goals of the work is critical for systems of the future.

DDA exemplifies this type of challenge in the library. Libraries want to offer new ebooks to users and make a larger array of content discoverable but face challenges with the lifecycle tasks related to evaluating the collection, managing and making DDA content discoverable, and evaluating the success of their programs. Other aspects include new approaches to cost management and successful approaches to workflows across multiple library systems.

Be part of our lively and open discussion as a few librarians share new approaches for managing electronic resources and acquisitions, talk about discovery, assessment, hybrid approaches and thoughts on how future systems can better support users and goals. Get a close look at their special projects and workflow services, ask questions and discover ways that you can effectively manage your resources now. Join us!

Moderators
avatar for Ms. Michelle D'Couto, BSE Chemical Engineering

Ms. Michelle D'Couto, BSE Chemical Engineering

Senior Product Manager, ProQuest

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Daniels

Jeffrey Daniels

Head of Knowledge Access and Resource Management Services, Grand Valley State University
Grand Valley State University Libraries
avatar for Tracey Leger-Hornby

Tracey Leger-Hornby

Dean of Library Services, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Director, Milne Library, SUNY College at Geneseo
Cyril Oberlander is the Director of Milne Library at the SUNY College at Geneseo since April, 2012, and was previously the Interim Director since January 2011, and before that the Associate Director of Milne Library since January 2008.  Prior to that, he was the Director of Interlibrary Services at the University of Virginia Library 2005-2008; and Head of Interlibrary Loan at Portland State University from 1996-2005; and before that served... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Revising a Collection Development Manual: Challenges and Opportunities
This session examines the changing role of institutional collection development manuals and in particular the challenging questions that arose while revising such a document at a southeastern research university in the spring of 2013. The process began with a series of discussions about the balance of responsibilities expected of liaison librarians and their relationship to the collecting role. Library strategic plans and job descriptions increasingly call for expanded commitments by liaison librarians to digital services, scholarly communication, etc. At the same time, many new librarians inherit collections responsibility in an unstable market for free and paid scholarly content in multiple formats. Role balancing is nothing new for librarians, but this combination of changes raises questions about how to share expertise and set priorities in a collections development manual.

Speakers
TB

Tony Bremholm

Chief Bibliographer for Science & Engineering, Tulane University
avatar for Joshua Lupkin

Joshua Lupkin

Chief Bibliographer for the Humanities, Tulane University
With a background in history academia and museums, Josh Lupkin brings a strong interest in interest in the way that technology does and does not influence humanities' scholars use of scholarly resources. He is especially interested in the evolution of ebook platforms how to balance publisher, library, and end user needs in this area. He is also researching the impact of digital concsciousness on vibrant areas of alternative print culture... Read More →
EW

Eric Wedig

Chief Bibliographer for the Social Sciences, Tulane University


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Shared E-books from Coast to Coast: Consortial Programs in Florida and the Pacific Northwest
Sadie Williams (slides)

Trey Shelton (slides)

In the past two years the locus of demand-driven or patron-driven acquisitions (PDA/DDA) has broadened beyond a single institution to include various academic library consortia. Facilitators from the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a 37-member early implementer (2011) of consortial DDA, and the 11-member State University Libraries Consortium in Florida, which is preparing to launch its own consortial program, will lead a discussion of the challenges and opportunities of shared PDA/DDA based on lessons learned. Special focus will be on the complexities of collection building among multiple institutions, planning for and evaluating success, and the role that vendor partners play in supporting consortial goals.

Some of the key issues and topics to be addressed by the panel include:

• Adding new content while controlling expenditures
• Assessment & program review
• Designing the shared plan; creating profiles/setting parameters
• Funding shared plans; sustainability of program
• Impact on collection development
• Publisher considerations
• Report generation for cost/usage/purchased titles
• Tech aspects & record management—review, de-duplication, delivery, removal

Moderators
avatar for Linda Di Biase

Linda Di Biase

Ebook and Collaborative Collections Strategy Librarian, University of Washington Libraries
Linda Di Biase's 30 years of collection development experience at the University of Washington Libraries has encompassed everything from information resources selection to budget allocation and consortial collection strategies. She has overseen the development of a robust academic ebook collection, both at her own institution and for the Orbis Cascade Alliance, where she has served on the Ebook Working Group. Linda has published and presented... Read More →
avatar for Mary Page

Mary Page

Associate Director, Collections & Technical Services, University of Central Florida Libraries
Mary Page is the Associate Director for Collections and Technical Services at the University of Central Florida. She has also worked at the University of California, Davis, and Rutgers University. Mary is a past-president of NASIG and is the current president-elect of ALCTS.

Speakers
SC

Steven Carrico

Acq Librarian, University of Florida
Steven Carrico has been employed as an Acquisitions Librarian at the University of Florida Smathers Libraries since 1994. He has authored or co-authored a wide range of refereed and non-refereed journal articles, book reviews, bibliographies, and three monograph chapters (in ALA Editions, Haworth Press, and Chandos Publishing). Steve has presented at several conferences and serves or has served on numerous national and state library... Read More →
EG

Erin Gallagher

Collections Consultant, Ingram Coutts
Erin Gallagher is a Collections Consultant for Ingram Library Services, a leader in distribution, print-on-demand, and academic library services.  Erin's coverage area includes the Southeastern US and Atlantic Canada, where she partners with academic libraries to build and maintain Approval, Slip, and Patron-driven profiles.  She joined Ingram in 2010 after completing her M.L.I.S. from Florida State University.  While at FSU... Read More →
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

E-Resources Librarian, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
I am the E-Resources & Acqusitions Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. I have been with the Smathers Libraries since 2010, and in my current role since 2012. I received my MLS from the University of South Florida in 2009. My primary research focus is cost, use, and usage studies of e-resources, particularly pertaining to data driven decision making. I am also interested in acquisition/e-resource workflow... Read More →
JT

Joan Thompson

Collection Development Manager, YBP Library Services
avatar for Sadie Williams

Sadie Williams

Director of Product Marketing, Workflow Solutions, ProQuest


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Streaming Video in Academic Libraries: Preliminary Results from a National Survey
In spring 2013 the presenters developed a survey on academic library streaming video and distributed it broadly through various discussion and mailing lists.

This is the first large-scale and most comprehensive effort to date to collect data on streaming video funding, licensing, acquisition, and hosting in academic libraries. Its results will provide benchmark data for future explorations of this rapidly expanding approach to video in academic libraries.

Streaming video is becoming a common occurrence on many campuses today. Its fast growth is due in part to the steady growth of online classes and programs. Technology has also played a role in this growth as alternatives for ingesting and accessing content have expanded. Multiple options are now available including in-house approaches, cloud storage, and third party vendors.

This survey collected data on how academic institutions address the day-to-day operations related to streaming video as well as perceived directions for future action.

Survey questions addressed selection and acquisition of video in both hard copy and streaming formats, funding for acquisitions, current and planned hosting interfaces, cataloging and access, and current practice and policy on digitization of hard copy titles for streaming. This session reviews the instrument used, and provides a preliminary look at some of the key data collected.

Speakers
avatar for deg farrelly

deg farrelly

Media Librarian, Arizona State University Libraries
With 40 years experience as a media librarian deg farrelly provides a unique perspective on video in academic libraries. He is the author of “Streaming Video” in the book Rethinking Collection Development and Management, (published by ABC-Clio) and co-investigator in the 2013 and 2015 national surveys of academic library streaming video. (Results of the 2013 survey presented at the Charleston Conference and published in Against the... Read More →
avatar for Jane Hutchison

Jane Hutchison

Associate Director, Instruction & Research Technology, William Paterson University
Jane Hutchison is the Associate Director of Instruction & Research Technology at William Paterson University in Wayne, NJ, managing Media Services and Broadcast, Production and Support divisions. Jane is actively involved in classroom technology and selecting and managing the media collection at WPU for over 30 years.   As a media librarian, Jane has evaluated, selected and acquired media for the University.  She was on the team that... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

The New Normal: Publishers and the New Open Access Mixed Economy
With the OSTP’s most recent calls for a government-wide public access policy and RCUK’s full implementation of such a plan, open access continues to challenge publishers, funding agencies, libraries, and authors to think differently and more broadly about the future of access to scholarly material.

Moderated by a member of the ACS Publications Customer Advisory Panel, join commercial, university, and society publishers as they discuss how they are strategizing for the future of OA and how their policies have evolved. This panel will explore the questions facing all stakeholders in the midst of this paradigm shift:

• Does the future of publishing mean a complete transition to OA?
• What are the implications for an OA/subscription mixed economy and is this the new normal?
• What, if any, are the unintended consequences of this new mixed economy for libraries, publishers, and authors?
• How much is too much when it comes to the deluge of scientific research and the problem of predatory publishers?
• What, if any, will be the impact on quality in this new normal economy?

Moderators
avatar for Andrew White

Andrew White

Associate CIO for Health Sciences, Senior Director for Research Computing, Stony Brook University
Andrew has worked in academic/ research libraries for more than 25 years, holding positions as  Associate Director, Associate Dean, and Director. Prior to becoming the Associate CIO for Health Sciences, he was the Interim Dean of Libraries at Stony Brook University. Andrew is a member of Beta Phi Mu and holds a MLS from Queens College and a doctorate from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He has several peer-reviewed and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Burley

Rachel Burley

Vice President and Director, Open Access, Wiley
avatar for Kevin Davies

Kevin Davies

VP Business Development, American Chemical Society
Kevin Davies PhD is a editor, author and publisher with more than 20 years' experience in science publishing. He is the founding editor of Nature Genetics and former editor-in-chief of Cell Press (following its acquisition in 2000 by Elsevier). He is the author of three popular science books, including "Cracking the Genome" and most recently "The $1,000 Genome" (Free Press, 2010). Before joining the ACS in 2013, Kevin was the founding editor of... Read More →
MM

Michael Magoulias

Journals Director, University of Chicago Press
Michael Magoulias began his publishing life as a sub-editor on British Vogue and Tatler. His subsequent career has been devoted to the sustaining rigors of academic and professional publishing, including Gale Research, Chadwyck-Healey, and Encyclopaedia Britannica. He spent 14 years at Elsevier, most recently serving as Publishing Director for "The Lancet" portfolio. Since April 2012, he has served as Director of the Journals Division of the... Read More →
avatar for Simon Ross

Simon Ross

Managing Director, Journals / Deputy MD Academic Publishing, Cambridge University Press
BR

Brett Rubinstein

Head of Business Development and Sales for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, Institute of Physics Publishing
BS

Bob Schatz

Institutional Engagement Manager, NA, Springer Nature
Bob, who holds a library degree from the University of Oregon, is a long-time participant in the Charleston Conference and the larger library community. He has been a part of and hosted numerous panels and presentations and contributed to library literature, including as a past columnist for Against the Grain. Having spent over thirty years in bookselling to academic libraries. Bob is now part of a newly formed team of Institutional Engagement... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Too Little is Not Enough
The Council of University of Wisconsin Libraries (CUWL) provides a forum and structure for library information planning within the University of Wisconsin System. The Council represents UW libraries on 13 two-year campuses, 11 four-year campuses and two research campuses and engages in activities such as cooperative planning and purchasing, materials delivery, training, and more. The Council’s shared collection development budget has remained flat for a number of years and inflationary increases have forced cutbacks. That materialsbudget is administered by CUWL’s Collection Development Committee (CDC).

The CDC has created and maintained a shared electronic collection for almost 15 years. In order to continue collaborating, and expand resources the CDC is looking at alternative and innovative ways to increase flexibility and expand buying power in spite of years of flat budgets. As a part of that process CUWL and the CDC are reviewing: resource sharing patterns among libraries, purchasing habits across the system, traditional materials delivery services, overlap studies, the benefits and drawbacks of cooperative purchasing, bill back models for shared collections, budget realignment, and the group is taking a fresh look at how they do business. The presenters will share methods for system-wide data analysis, techniques for getting all functional areas involved in the collection and analysis of data, and they'll discuss how to leverage that data to make forward thinking decisions. The group is encouraged by how well received this work has been and by new opportunities for innovation and collaboration.

Speakers
SM

Susan Mitchell

Library Program Manager, University of Wisconsin System Administration
Susan is a native of the Adirondack Mountains in New York State and has spent most of her career in academic libraries. She was the Head of Technical Services and Coordinator of Library Assessment at the University of Alaska Anchorage before moving south and accepting a job with the University of Wisconsin System in July 2012. As the Library Program Manager for UW System Administration she works closely with the Council of University of Wisconsin... Read More →
JP

Janet Padway

Assistant Director of Libraries-Collection and Resource Management, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee Libraries
JR

Joan Robb

Coordinator of Collection Management, University of Wisconsin - Green Bay, Cofrin Library


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Your Budget is Stretched. Reference Content is Free Online. So Why are New Reference Works from “Traditional” Publishers Worth Your Investment?
New technologies and processes are rapidly transforming reference content – the way it is commissioned and sold by publishers, edited by experts, acquired by librarians, and used by patrons. What are the implications of this transformation for you, and for how you allocate your budget?

A panel will provoke your thoughts and provide answers on these topics:

- How has reference commissioning and publishing changed, and what does it mean for me?
- How can I balance providing reference content that is the most trustworthy vs. the most current, without breaking my budget?
- What is the role of free reference content?
- What new models for buying reference content are becoming available to me?

Moderators
avatar for Heather Donnellan

Heather Donnellan

Channel Manager, Third-Party Platforms, Elsevier Science and Technology Books
As the manager of third-party platforms at Elsevier, I work to make sure that our science and technology content is accessible wherever, whenever, and however our end-users prefer to ingest it. I'm passionate about ebooks, the different ways they are being delivered, and what devices they are being read on. Electronic content opens up a world of opportunities to reach people in new ways.

Speakers
DD

Dominick DellaSala

President, Chief Scientist, Geos Institute
avatar for Cory Polonetsky

Cory Polonetsky

Marketing Director, Elsevier
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, College of the Arts, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers, faculty and students who are intriguing and dedicated to the disciplines they are engaged in. | | As a Charleston Conference Director I collaborate with other... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Copyright in the Digital Era: The HathiTrust and Georgia State University Cases
This presentation will cover two of the leading cases on copyright in the digital era. We'll look closely at the implications of lawsuits in the HathiTrust and Georgia State University cases. In both of these cases the defendants prevailed at the District Court and both have been appealed. These cases focus on how libraries may use copyrighted works under fair use.

Speakers
JB

Jack Bernard

Associate General Counsel, University of Michigan


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Data to Decisions: Shared Print Retention in Maine
All of a sudden, libraries seem have too much print in their stacks, much of it unused, if statistics are to be believed. The usual solution is judicious de-accessioning, aka weeding, based on various factors such as circulation, age, duplication across formats, and collection policies. This may be fine for individual libraries, but what if you’re part of group of libraries, interdependent and connected by a shared discovery catalog and delivery service? What if no one kept enough copies of stuff to supply users with needed books and journals in the future? And aren’t we all really parts of a larger library group?

Learn how nine institutions in Maine – including public, university, and college libraries, the state library, and the statewide collaborative system – are deciding what to keep, rather than what to discard. At last year’s Charleston Conference, the Maine Shared Collections Strategy grant, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, presented as part of the Shared Print Archiving: Making It Work preconference. We’ve made great progress since then.

Deb Rollins (Collection Services, University of Maine) and Becky Albitz (Collection Management, Bates College) will discuss the review and analysis of collections data for a collective three million monographs, OCLC shared print symbols and retention disclosure from local to national levels, HathiTrust and Internet Archive digital copies and their effect on decisions, implications of a multi-type library group on what we’re keeping, policy issues, and more.

We hope participants will come to the session with questions and observations and ideas, and will leave with some understanding of the factors involved in managing legacy print in a collective collection.

Speakers
BA

Becky Albitz

Associate College Librarian for Collection Management, Bates College
Becky Albitz is the Associate Librarian for Collection Management at Bates College. Previously she was the Electronic Resources and Copyright Librarian at Penn State, Head Librarian at Penn State Shenango, Media and Performing Arts Librarian at NYU and the Media Librarian at the University of Iowa. She received her undergraduate degrees in film and English from the University of Rochester, a masters in film from Penn State, an MLS from The... Read More →
DR

Deb Rollins

Head, Collection Services, University of Maine


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Do Approval Plan Purchases Circulate More Than Firm Orders?
Do print books purchased by individual selectors circulate more frequently than books acquired via an approval plan? There have been few studies that analyze circulation data categorized by acquisition model. Kent State University will share results from circulation data gathered from its large research library on the Kent Campus and a smaller regional campus library, comparing firm orders to approval plan orders over a five year period. Variable data such as publisher, publication date, LC classification and academic department further define effectiveness of these two acquisitions models.

Evaluation of these data could impact how funds are allocated across disciplines. Results may influence acquisition behavior and impact models such as print purchase-on-demand models, which typically have higher circulation compared with traditional acquisition models, as well as ebook purchasing models like Demand-Driven Acquisitions and Short Term Lending.

Attendees can expect to learn about (1) evaluating the effectiveness of selected vs. approval acquisition models for print books and (2) implications for strategic distribution of collection funds based on use outcomes for different acquisition models.

Speakers
KD

Kay Downey

Collection Management Librarian, University Libraries, Kent State University
Kay Downey (mdowney1@kent.edu) is an associate professor and Collection Management Librarian at Kent State University Libraries. Her research interests include library acquisitions and collection development. She has a B.F.A in Painting and Drawing, and M.L.S. in Library Science.
avatar for Rob Kairis

Rob Kairis

Library Director, Kent State University, Stark Campus
My interests include: Cooperative Collection Development, Library Approval Plans, Plagiarism, Academic Honesty, Information Literacy.


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Government Documents and InterLibrary Loan: The Red Headed Stepchildren in the Technical Services Process
Speak of government publications collections or interlibrary to colleagues and quite often one receives a glazed over look. In the era of reorganization, retirement and reductions these collections and services have come under a microscope as to their value. Traditionally government publications have been considered a stand-alone collection, where the documents librarian makes all of the decisions without input from subject specialists, bibliographers or technical services staff. Interlibrary Loan has faced many of the same issues. Traditionally they exist to get the needed materials for our users. Many librarians took a class on government publications and document delivery and never looked back. But the understanding of these unique areas are important to the technical services and collection management process. The model for collection management, providing service and the processing in these areas is changing. As selectors we need to take a second look at how these areas can be treated as integrated areas of the library. We will discuss what some of the traditional models have been and how they are changing to meet these new needs. We will also involve the audience in questions they have about documents and interlibrary loan and integrating them into public service and technical services more fully.

Speakers
DD

Donna Daniels

Government Documents and Social Sciences Librarian, University of Arkansas
TG

Tess Gibson

Head, Interlibrary Loan, University of Arkansas
LH

Lia Hemphill

Director of Collection Development, Nova Southeastern University


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

How Is That Going to Work?: Rethinking Acquisitions in a Next-Generation ILS
What do acquisitions policies and workflows look like in next-generation systems? How can institutions leverage automated processes to improve efficiency, and what happens when you also belong to a consortium that is looking to increase collaboration? The Orbis Cascade Alliance is a consortium of 37 public and private academic institutions in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. In January 2012, the Alliance began a 2-year process of migrating all 37 institutions to a shared ILS. Migrating in 4 cohorts every 6 months, the first cohort of 6 institutions went live with Ex Libris’s Alma and Primo in July 2013. Representatives from 3 of the 6 pioneering libraries will discuss topics such as preparing for migration to a new system, changes in workflow, challenges and opportunities for a new system, and what may be coming down the pike for cooperative collection development in the Alliance. Questions encouraged from the audience, especially from attendees who may be pondering or about to embark upon their own migrations.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Drake

Megan Drake

Systems and Applications Librarian, Pacific University
SR

Siôn Romaine

Acquisitions Librarian/Canadian Studies Librarian, University of Washington Libraries
Sion Romaine is an Acquisitions Librarian and the Library Management System Coordinator at the University of Washington Libraries. He is also the Canadian Studies Librarian.
avatar for Kathleen Spring

Kathleen Spring

Collection Management Librarian/Assistant Professor, Linfield College
Kathleen Spring is Collections Management Librarian/Assistant Professor and DigitalCommons Coordinator at Linfield College. Prior to beginning a career in libraries, Kathleen taught speech communication at Eastern Oregon University, Suffolk County Community College, and Hofstra University. Her research interests focus on the intersections of libraries and communication studies, particularly the performance of librarianship, as well as... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Lack of Evidence: Proving ROI for eBooks Beyond a Reasonable Doubt
Librarians continue to grow their scholarly ebook collections, and while many are seeking to establish more formal systems of measurement to determine the value of these collections, it can seem a daunting task without precedents on which to base their decisions. For librarians and administrators working to meet competing demands with limited resources, understanding the value of ebooks will be of great importance for the foreseeable future as expenditures grow. But Return on Investment (ROI) for ebooks in research and academic libraries can be difficult to determine, as the factors considered can vary widely.

In this session, a panel consisting of librarians, a publisher and consultant will present a broad overview of the current state of ebooks valuation in academic and special libraries along with its trends and dominant challenges. In addition, we will address some ways in which the scholarly ebook landscape is likely to change in the future and the anticipated impact on measuring the ROI of ebooks throughout the library community. Finally, the panel will discuss possible ways publishers, librarians and researchers can work together to improve methods of analysis and adjust to meet the needs of users.

Attendees can expect to learn about research currently available into the value of ebooks that is important to justify development decisions, how the evolution of ejournal publishing can inform the rapid growth of ebook acquisitions going forward, how to gather feedback from users via surveys on how and where they access ebooks, and how to channel these findings back to publishers to influence development of COUNTER-compliant statistics and enhancement of ebook platforms making content accessible, discoverable, granular and mobile.

Speakers
TC

Tina Chrzastowski

Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Tina E. Chrzastowski is Professor Emerita, formerly Chemistry Librarian and Professor of Library Administration, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC).  Prior to UIUC, she held academic library positions at the University of Delaware and the University of Washington.  Her research focuses on collection use and assessment, including longitudinal use studies, user surveys, and musings about transitions taking place in... Read More →
avatar for Janet Fisher

Janet Fisher

Senior Publishing Consultant, Publishers Communication Group
Janet Fisher has been in scholarly journals publishing for over 20 years, with stints at University of Texas Press and MIT Press. In 2003 she moved to Ingenta and then to Publishers Communication Group as Senior Publishing Consultant. Janet works with  academic and commercial publishers to support their marketing  efforts through research, telemarketing and content sales. 
JK

Jennifer Kemp

eProduct Manager, eBooks, Springer
Jennifer Kemp is Product Manager of eBooks at Springer in New York. Prior to joining Springer, she was a Publication Manager at Stanford University’s HighWire Press. Jennifer started her career as a librarian at IBM, where she spent several years in a variety of roles at the Watson and Almaden Research Centers.
avatar for Deborah Lenares

Deborah Lenares

Manager, Library Acquisitions and Resource Sharing, Wellesley College
Deborah has worked in libraries since 1996, and is currently Manager of Acquisitions and Resource Sharing at Wellesley College. Her current area of research is the use of and attitudes toward academic ebooks, which complements her earlier research examining the adoption of e-journals during their early phase.


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Auditorium, Science and Mathematics Building 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Making the Big Move: Moving to Cloud-Based OCLC’s WorldShare Management Services (WMS)
UNC Charlotte Atkins Library went live with a cloud-based ILS in July 2013 after a seven-month implementation period. A main purpose of the implementation was reducing outsourcing services, such as MARCIVE Authority Processing service, EBSCO's Discovery Service for a single search discovery tool, Syndetics Solutions for book cover art and others. This presentation focuses on implementation challenges and how jobs and workflow changed in the areas of Acquisitions, Electronic Resources Management and Circulation. The Head of Technical Services will talk about some of the issues the library had during the implementation stage, including changes in the Acquisitions workflow and cataloging. The Electronic and Continuing Resources Librarian covers changes in electronic resources management and procedures using the OCLC Knowledge Base including designing workflows and repurposing staff in order to establish new processes in electronic resources management. The Library Webmaster will discuss WMS' impact on Circulation Services, with a focus on client and server-side architectures and performance, and the subsequent effects on real-world customer service. Discussion about UNC Charlotte’s enterprise-grade WMS integration using Banner, Blackboard Transact, and Active Directory (LDAP), and highlighting UNC Charlotte’s new Stuart system, which keeps Atkins Library synchronized with UNC Charlotte. The presentation aims to demonstrate challenges related to a cloud-based ILS and suggests solutions to improve the system from a library’s perspective.

Speakers
avatar for Brad Spry

Brad Spry

Library Webmaster, UNC Charlotte
ST

Shoko Tokoro

Electronic & Continuing Resources Coordinator, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Michael Winecoff

Michael Winecoff

Associate Dean for Collection Services, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Associate Dean for Collection Services and oversee Collections and Acquisitions. Before taking this position I gained valuable paraprofessional experience as a copy cataloger, catalog maintenance coordinator and supervisor of the Accounts Payable and Receiving section of Acquisitions and Assistant University Librarian for Library Systems.


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 138, Science and Mathematics Building 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Metadata and Open Access – Reliably Finding Content and Finding Reliable Content

Open access publishing continues to be a topic of debate and discussion in the popular media, blogs and listservs.  A panel representing different points of view will discuss open access journals and articles from the perspective of metadata and accessibility. Open access content is the utmost accessible content, if students and researchers know how to find it, and know how to judge whether what they find is worthy of inclusion in their research. The discussion will focus on how to make open access publications and articles more accessible.

Questions the session will strive to answer are:

  • What metadata elements would help academic librarians and researchers find these resources within the larger databases, institutional repositories, and/or discovery services?
  • How do librarians vet open access publications for research by students and faculty?  How do they determine which titles to include in their catalogs, and how to catalog them?
  • What are benefits and considerations for identifying the most appropriate open access publications for their researchers to use and to publish in?  And is this identification even needed by researchers?
  • What additional information would be helpful?  What role could publishers of directories and providers of link, search, and discovery services play to that would lead to open access content?

Attendees will be encouraged to engage in the discussion and provide input as to what they see as being done well, and what issues they have with open access content. This potentially dynamic discussion we hope will be thought provoking and foster new thinking on the importance of metadata in reliably finding content – and finding reliable content!


Speakers
avatar for Sommer Browning

Sommer Browning

Interim Associate Director of Technical Services and Head of Resource Management, University of Colorado Denver- Auraria Library
Auraria Library, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Jean-Claude Guédon

Jean-Claude Guédon

Professor, Department of Comparative Literature, University of Montreal
Jean-Claude Guédon received his Ph.D. in history of science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1974 with a thesis on chemistry in the Encyclopédie of Diderot and d'Alembert. He is a professor of comparative literature at the University of Montreal. His main areas of interest include the digitization of culture, in particular the relationship between texts and technology, cyberculture, electronic publishing and... Read More →
avatar for Laurie Kaplan

Laurie Kaplan

Sr. Project Manager, ProQuest
Laurie Kaplan, as Director of Editorial Operations at ProQuest, facilitates efforts of the international database and the Serials Provider Relations teams. Throughout her career of over a decade at ProQuest, Laurie has successfully directed the international data team responsible for Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, Ulrich’s Web, and the multinational databases in 360 Core. Prior to joining ProQuest, Laurie worked in legal directory... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Opportunities and Challenges of Data Publication: A Case from Purdue
Beginning in 2011, there have been several policy changes directly affecting the management, preservation, and accessibility of publically-funded research and resulting research data in the United States. In January 18, 2011 the National Science Foundation (NSF) required data management plans to be submitted with all grant proposals. On February 22, 2013, the Office of Science and Technology Policy of the President of the United States extended a similar requirement to all federal agencies who have a research and development budget of more than $100 million. These requirements illustrate the need for further coordination and management of data as scholarship and traditional scholarship in integrated publishing solutions.

The case study presented in this concurrent session will illustrate an early initiative at Purdue University to integrate discrete data publications with traditional scholarly publications through leveraging new and existing repository platforms and services. Examination of the case study will involve a discussion of workflow integration between Purdue’s data repository, the Purdue University Research Repository (PURR), its traditional press, the Purdue University Press (PUP), and the institutional repository, Purdue e-Pubs.

Attendees can expect to participate in a discussion on the opportunities and issues they may face when addressing the national dialogue on providing open access to datasets, as well as meeting federal and funder requirements, while reducing national and global research redundancy. Plenty of time will be allotted for questions and further discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney E. Matthews

Courtney E. Matthews

Ditigal Data Repository Specialist, Purdue University
Courtney is the Digital Data Repository Specialist for the Purdue University Research Repository (PURR). He manages the day-to-day activities of PURR and advocates for the necessary role of librarians in the research data life-cycle spanning data management planning, research project collaboration, dataset publication with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI), and long-term preservation. | | Courtney is a native of Prince Edward Island who... Read More →
avatar for David Scherer

David Scherer

Scholarly Communications and Research Curation Consultant, Carnegie Mellon University
David Scherer is the assistant to the dean of libraries at Carnegie Mellon University. Previously, David was the scholarly repository specialist with the Purdue University Libraries. In that role he oversaw Purdue’s primary institutional repository, Purdue e-Pubs, and educated faculty on open ac- cess and author rights, new models of publishing, and opportunities for open access publishing. Alongside his colleagues at the Purdue University... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Zilinski

Lisa Zilinski

Data Specialist and Assistant Professor of Library Science, Purdue University
Lisa Zilinski is a Data Specialist and Assistant Professor of Library Science in the Purdue Libraries at Purdue University. Lisa works with the Libraries’ faculty and staff to identify data literacy opportunities, develop learning plans and tools for data education, and investigates data services. Lisa earned her master of library science degree from The Florida State University, School of Library & Information Studies. She has worked as a... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Pitch Perfect: Selling to Libraries and Selling Libraries to Non-Users
Sales is the art of persuasion. It is intentional activity to move another individual (or group of individuals) to a desired outcome—e.g., “no” to “yes”; “maybe” to “yes; ”yes, someday” to “yes, now.” And, not surprisingly, there are numerous strategies for selling—challenger, consultative, high-touch, solution selling, etc. Regardless of the particular sales method in use, it’s important to recognize that sales activity is purposeful, goal driven, and remarkably effective. Paradoxically, the most effective sales interactions are those where the customer doesn’t even recognize that they’ve been “sold.” The mark of a great sales person is the ability to leave customers thinking that it is they—the customers—who have realized their will.

This program looks at three questions related to library sales:

1) What are the characteristics that library suppliers look for in their sales personnel?
2) How do library vendors train, manage and incentivize their sales teams?
3) Should librarians—especially subject liaisons in academic libraries—be recruited, trained and managed as if they were sales workers, charged with influencing faculty and student uptake of library materials and services?

While libraries generally characterize themselves as “learning organizations” as opposed to “sales organizations,” the fact remains that when libraries talk about liaisons assigned to provide “outreach” or “engagement,” they might just as well be talking about sales. And, if they were to think about library work in the context of sales, administrators would undoubtedly hire differently, manage differently, and use different criteria to evaluate and incentivize library staff. They would also recognize the need for different strategies for management, including the recruitment of experienced sales managers to direct the goals and activity of their library sales force.

This program, led by librarians and professional sales managers, is intended to address the need of libraries, as customers and service providers, to understand more about the theory, practice and management of sales, including the potential use of tools like Salesforce.com to monitor and evaluate librarian performance.

Speakers
DC

Dave Celano

Vice President for Library Sales, Springer
MO

Melissa Oakes

Sales Manager, ProQuest
MR

Marianne Ryan

Associate University Librarian, User Strategies, Northwestern University Libraries
avatar for Mark Sandler

Mark Sandler

Director, CIC Center for Library Initiatives, Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC)
Mark Sandler is the Director of the Center for Library Initiatives at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). He is interested in how libraries, publishers and users are managing the transition from print to electronic resources, with particular focus on the collaborative efforts of libraries to extend their mission to include content creation. He was a founder of the Text Creation Partnership, and has worked closely with the Google... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Rebuilding the Plane While Flying: Library/Vendor Strategies for Approval Plan Revision (in a DDA World)
How does a library review and rewrite its approval plan while gradually transitioning from a monograph collection that is primarily print to one that in the future will be primarily electronic?

This session will review and describe the arduous but ultimately worthwhile and satisfying project that Loyola Marymount University and YBP Library Services undertook in a yearlong approval profile review. Attendees will hear how the library and the approval plan vendor strategized and collaborated to involve over twenty subject liaisons with varying levels of collection development experience. We will discuss the support infrastructure that the library used to get liaisons up to speed on the relevant issues and their roles in the project. We will also explain the communications and collaboration tools we used to document a process with myriad details to track. Attendees will hear tips from both the library and vendor perspectives on how to effectively structure and implement approval plan revisions for both print and electronic books.

Underlying this whole project was the belief that the approval plan (and intentional collection building) still has an important place in libraries, or at least for one library. During the general discussion segment of our session, we want to hear differing perspectives on whether and how to embark on such a major undertaking.

Speakers
avatar for Charles Hillen

Charles Hillen

Head of Acquisitions & Serials, Loyola Marymount University
avatar for Glenn Johnson-Grau

Glenn Johnson-Grau

Head of Acquisitions & Collection Development, Loyola Marymount University
Glenn Johnson-Grau is Head of Collection Development at Loyola Marymount University. He frequently reminds himself that all is flux and nothing stays still.
JT

Joan Thompson

Collection Development Manager, YBP Library Services


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 227, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Secrets in Vendor Negotiations
Libraries purchase, license, lease or otherwise acquire a multitude of services from a variety of vendors. Whether the library is negotiating for content from a publisher on subscriptions, or perpetual lease, or if the library is acquiring new technology or services from outside or affiliate organizations, the staff responsible for negotiations can ensure better results in terms of price & performance if armed with more knowledge, proven strategies and actionable intelligence.

Based on decades of complex content and technology negotiations from the vendor perspective, and dozens of interviews of information professionals tasked with negotiations for products & services -- This provides actionable takeaways that attendees will be able to use immediately in their negotiations with all vendors - technology, content, and service providers. Attendees will be able to gain greater efficiency from their budgets, more clarity in vendor deliverables / reduction of renewal surprises / increased return on product investment and better understanding of vendors' motivations. Attendees are encouraged bring real-life examples to the session.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Dunie

Matt Dunie

President, Data-Planet
Matt Dunie has founded or co-founded three information and content application services companies (Insight Publications, RefWorks, and LabArchives), is an advisor to ThirdIron, and held numerous executive-level management positions and professional association board positions. His professional experience includes senior positions at Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA), Atlantic Media, and Thomson. He has been involved with leading industry and... Read More →
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Associate Dean, Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer, University of Oklahoma
Carl Grant is the Associate Dean for Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer at the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Carl has an extensive background in the information industry and has worked for many years in the corporate enterprise that supports library services in leadership positions at Ex Libris, VTLS, Ameritech Library Services, and Innovative Interfaces.
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

President/CEO, Gruenberg Consulting LLC
Mike Gruenberg’s name in the Information Services Industry is synonymous with winning results – in sales team development and leadership, in performance and customer satisfaction, and in his own success in selling complex information services into demanding markets worldwide. Mike’s track record during more than 30 years in the Industry is headlined by the significant profit performance he has delivered in every position he... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Shotgun Sessions
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 4 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have approximately 15 minutes at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all 5 sessions. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Next Gen ILL:Tales From the Trenches
Becky Imamoto, University of California, Irvine

Becky Imamoto (slides)

Interlibrary Loan (ILL) is an important service that is highly valued by faculty, students, and staff at UC Irvine. Providing access to information resources quickly and efficiently is an ongoing goal of the UCI Libraries. Internal factors such as budget cuts and reduced staffing and external factors such as the ease and affordability of on-demand purchases made the time ripe to investigate and improve interlibrary loan services. A series of pilot projects involving staff from Access Services, Collections and Acquisitions were conducted to measure the cost of services, decrease time to delivery and improve workflow. These pilot projects included purchasing items on demand, using staff expertise in other departments, and using existing technology to enhance workflow. Our objective is to show how a number of small, flexible projects can make a big difference in delivering content to our users more expeditiously than traditional ILL. At the 2012 Charleston Conference, we presented a program while in the initial phase of our 2nd pilot. We have since concluded that pilot and have taken the valuable information we learned to create a 3rd pilot with a more eBooks focus. Attendees can expect to learn strategies to help change workflow using existing staff and resources, manage staff expectations and to hear about our victories as well as our defeats.

2) Preparing Perpetual Access Holdings Data with Perl: Context, Workflow and Scripts
Viral Amin, Marymount University

I will demonstrate a flexible, heuristic approach using the Perl programming language with which I prepared Cambridge Journal Online holdings data for upload to Data Management in Serials Solutions' Client Center.  Two separate contractual agreements, one through our consortium partner VIVA and the other directly with Cambridge, resulted in two sets of titles and holdings that had to be manipulated and merged.  I will describe the complexity and challenges of managing electronic serials holdings data and how I surmounted them with Perl scripts.

3) The High Cost of Too Much
Susan Klimley, Columbia University


Academic librarians in the United States have always prided themselves on the size of their collections. The more we had, the more successful and relevant we were. But too much has become too expensive to obtain and sustain in an academic environment. It produces information overload, counterproductive to intuitive access and discovery. It is time for librarians to rise up as expert purchasing agents for our institutions.

4) Comparing Statistics across Platforms-Dos and Don’ts 
Deborah Kegel, University of California, San Diego

Usage statistics for e-resources  may be successfully compared if you know the pitfalls caused from missing or anomalous data and changes in vendors/ platforms.  Learn what works when analyzing journal packages, e-books from aggregators,  e-books from publishers, and A&I databases.   Find the bad/erroneous data and interpolate and extrapolate so you can figure out what those users are doing.  JUR5 can tell you about what's being used, so why aren't more publishers producing this report?  Learn how to make good collections decisions with the data our vendors provide & when to ask questions of the vendors.

Speakers
MV

Mr. Viral M Amin, MA, MS

Metadata / Electronic Resources Librarian, Marymount University
Marymount University
avatar for Becky Imamoto

Becky Imamoto

Research Librarian for History, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Deborah Kegel

Deborah Kegel

Reference Collections Coordinator & Physical Science-Engineering Librarian, University of California, San Diego
reference, collections, engineering, computer science, math, statistics, physics, astronomy
SK

Susan Klimley

Serials and Electronic Resources Librarian, Health Sciences Library, Columbia University
My time is spent reviewing download statistics, monitoring Medical Center publishing patterns, trying to make the link resolver work properly and  keeping up with the latest journal pricing plans. My motto: if it doesn't work, fix it.


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

Subject Librarian Initiative at the University of Central Florida Libraries: Collaboration Amongst Scholarly Communication, Research & Information Services, and Acquisitions & Collections Development
At the University of Central Florida Libraries, the Scholarly Communication Division, the Research & Information Services Department and the Acquisitions & Collection Development Department are collaborating to create and support a Subject Librarian initiative that focuses on increased outreach to faculty and students and proactive promotion of scholarly communication initiatives to the university community. Since January 2013 these three units have worked together to emphasize the importance of Librarians becoming more fully integrated in the university infrastructure through increased Subject Liaison roles. This collaboration has involved realigning/reassigning librarian subject assignments, including librarians from all units in the Scholarly Communication Advisory Group, and creating a new Web presence for librarians which links their instruction and collection development assignments http://library.ucf.edu/SubjectLibrarians/

The new emphasis on Subject Librarians working to profile their assigned academic departments and faculty and to map the curriculum for their assigned academic programs is leading to better informed collection development, more refined curriculum integrated instruction and a greater understanding and appreciation of Scholarly Communication/Open Access issues as they apply to the various disciplines.

The Liaison Librarians assigned to Research & Info Services and Acquisitions & Collection Development serve side-by-side on the Scholarly Communications Advisory Group, participate side-by-side in Collection Development and Reference Services meetings, and work side-by-side at the Research & Information Services Desk. They also participate together in Scholarly Communication workshops, Reference Services retreats, and Collection Development training. Join Michael Arthur and Barbara Tierney as they present a power point illustrating the above collaboration along with sample documents and web pages that highlight the new initiative. Attendees will come away with strategies for successful scholarly communication collaboration amongst disparate units in an academic library.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Arthur

Michael Arthur

Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development, University of Central Florida
Michael Arthur is Head of Acquisitions & Collection Services at the University of Central Florida. Michael received his Bachelor of Science in Sport Marketing & Management in 1991, and his Master of Library Science in 1999, from Indiana University in Bloomington. He received his Master of Public Administration from Old Dominion University in 2006. Michael is active in ALA, and the North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG), and... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head, Research and Information Services Dept., University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). | | Barbara was an Invited Speaker at the 2016 Japan Association of National University Libraries (JANUL) Symposium at the University of Tokyo where she presented "The Learning Commons... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 120, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

Support When It Counts - Library Roles in Public Access to Federally-Funded Research
In November 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) said it would begin enforcing its earlier April 2008 public access mandate to NIH-funded research by delaying processing of investigators’ grants. In response, the NCSU Libraries offered to assist the university’s sponsored research office in supporting NC State researchers who had publications stemming from NIH funding and had not achieved compliance. Since the 2008 NIH mandate, over 1000 articles based on NIH-funding have been published by NC State across research areas including veterinary medicine, life sciences, physical sciences, social sciences, engineering, textiles, design, math and statistics. Many were published in journals which did not automatically deposit papers to meet NIH requirements. Although familiar with biomedical literature, author agreements and open access, we did not fully grasp the complex web of investigator, author, publisher, institution and funder relations involved in this mandate until we were deeply engaged in the process and gained access to the compliance monitoring data.

In this presentation, we will discuss the costs and benefits of library support for authors needing to attain compliance with an eye toward how this support may be scaled up if other federal funding agencies follow suit. We will share practical strategies for supporting compliance efforts for individual researchers and at the campus-wide level, as well as training newly-funded researchers to facilitate future compliance. Attendees will learn about leveraging existing relationships with publishers to help their researchers, strategies for getting involved in compliance support, and share insights on how to skill-up and scale-up when engaging in this part of the research process.

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Hilary Davis

Hilary Davis

Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
North Carolina State University Libraries


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

The Changing Face of Collection Development and Acquisitions: 40 Year Trip from the Past
I have been involved directly or indirectly with collection development and acquisitions for forty years. Today’s online tools, automated systems, and software support have greatly simplified the process. Join me on a not-so-nostalgic look at collection development and acquisitions through the years. I’ll go back to an era of card catalogs, microfilm on-order lists, and adding machines before returning to the present. Along the way, I’ll identify the major advances that have changed the face of collection development in addition to telling some of my favorite stories.

While most people at this conference understand the importance of the shift to digital over the last decade, other factors have led to profound changes. Approval plans were a new invention as libraries coped with the bankruptcy of the Richard Abel Company. Before the online catalog and other digital files, knowing cataloging rules to determine the main entry of the potential order was often the only way to avoid unwanted duplicates. Even the slightest error at the beginning of a citation could make the document undiscoverable. Another key factor for collection development was the brief window of availability for many publications. Research libraries had to have agents in countries where local publications sold out quickly and weren’t under bibliographic control. The out-of-print market was cumbersome with high transaction costs that upped prices. Small factors such as the lack of spreadsheets made analyzing the acquisitions accounts a tiresome task that occurred rarely and could take several days with adding machines as the only support. The mainframe computer could generate statistics, but they were much harder to analyze and required a programmer to write code for special reports.

Come take a trip in my time machine to an uncharted wilderness or down memory lane

Speakers
BH

Bob Holley

Professor Emeritus, Wayne State University
Professor Emeritus, Wayne State University School of Library & Information Science. Bob Holley has been actively involved in collection development since 1980 as an academic librarian, library science professor, and researcher. He was chief collection development officer at the University of Utah and at Wayne State University. He has taught collection development to hundreds of students both in the classroom and online in the Wayne State... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:15pm

The Contributor Role Taxonomy Project
A workshop sponsored by Harvard and the Wellcome Trust in the fall of 2011 discussed ways to improve recognition and details on all Contributor Roles in a published work.   The task force empowered by the workshop findings subsequently  built a small taxonomy for use in the categorization of the actual contribution and "author" or other contributor makes to the published paper.  The benefits to the library and research communities by having a more precise and extensive identification of all contributions to a paper from modeling to writing are significant.   

The initial taxonomy validation has been done by about 25 participating publishers.  Each participating publisher identified 50 or more articles with corresponding authors (of multi-authored works with between 2 and 15 authors) and completed a survey; they will provide us with a spreadsheet of relevant author names and journal info.  Corresponding authors and participating authors submitted their information using a spreadsheet template.   We are now soliciting additional feedback from a variety of constituents, including checking in with other authors of the relevant works to see if the test contributor role assignments accord with their perceptions of their own contributions.  we would like to have input from the library community.  Further background reading on this project, please see: http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/attribution_workshop/files/iwcsa_report_final_18sept12.pdf 

Speakers
avatar for Marjorie M. K.Hlava

Marjorie M. K.Hlava

President and Chairperson, Access Innovations, Inc.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava is President, Chairman, and founder of Access Innovations, Inc. Very well known in the international information arena, she is the founding Chair of the new SLA Taxonomy Division established in August 2009. She is past president of NFAIS (2002-2003), the organization of those who create, organize, and distribute information. Ms. Hlava is past president of the American Society for Information Science and Technology - 1993... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

The Short Form Work – eBooks, Journals, Monographs
A number of trends have contributed to the growth of “short form works” – medium length pieces of 5000 to 30000 words. These shorter works can be an effective format for academic research allowing authors to deeply explore a topic without the extraneous work associated with a typical length book. These works may be more consistent with modern reading habits and digital technologies to deliver this content. While the short form work may not be new to scientific and academic publishing, it is seeing revitalization. From some start-ups exploring this space in the mid-2000’s (Morgan + Claypool and now publishers in 2004), we see this trend moving across the publishing spectrum including university presses (Princeton Shorts and Stanford Briefs) to medium and large commercial STM houses (Springer Briefs and Palgrave Pivot). The business models, publishing models, and terms of sales for this type of content vary greatly. This session would review the publishing environment in this space including a review of publishing approaches and business models and some insight into the growing interest in this publishing format.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director of Library Relations, Business Expert Press / Momentum Press
Adam manages library relations for Business Expert Press and Momentum Press, two new companies which publish ebooks for business students and engineering professionals, respectively.  Previously he was Content Director for the American Society for Training and Development; prior to that, he held sales, customer relations, and customer service positions at the American Chemical Society; and customer relations, marketing... Read More →
avatar for Zac Rolnik

Zac Rolnik

President and Publisher, now publishers
Zac Rolnik has spent the last 25+ years in the academic publishing industry and is the founder and publisher at now publishers (www.nowpublishers.com).
LS

Luke Swindler

Collections Management Officer, Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Luke Swindler has been working in collections for over three decades. In his current position he has a leading role in analyzing, planning, and managing library collections generally and spearheading e-books initiatives specifically for the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

This Ain’t Your Papa’s Allocation Formula!: Team Based Approaches to Monograph Collections Budgets
The University of Guelph Library’s organizational renewal created new strategic teams out of the existing liaison-based model. Fundamental to this vision was the creation of small teams of specialists who would deepen their skills and engagement within specified team objectives; the Information Resources Team focuses exclusively on collection development, management and evaluation and assessment linked to curricula.

In moving to a team-based ethos, the IR Team has re-engineered and re-aligned how the institution allocates, budgets and orients its work for monographic collections. This presentation will cover the many external and internal factors that have shaped Guelph’s unique approach to this core team activity, including increased consortial licensing, evolving publishing trends, the growth of multi-institutional research teams, changes in research and teaching, an increased focus on accountability, and the demise of formal university governance bodies such as Guelph’s Senate Library Sub-Committee.

The evolution of the monographs budget has seen a shift from departmental budgets to broader allocated budgets in response to resource format changes (ebooks, digitized collections) and shifting strategic priorities (fund pooling, approval plans, curricular reform). A fundamental paradigm shift from allocation metrics towards post-hoc adjustments based on curricular need and efficiency is described. Time-series linked examples of current UG Mono budget structures will illustrate this budgetary evolution. The increasing reliance on external systems (GOBI, Cognos MIS) to actively manage the monographic budget allocations and expenditure processes will be discussed.

Strategies from both a Selector’s point of view and that of the Team Head to adapt, change and modify budgeting practices will be analyzed, with a focus on ensuring user needs and broad based disciplinary equity are met.

Speakers
SG

Scott Gillies

Head, Information Resources Team, University of Guelph
Scott Gillies is currently the Head of the Information Resources Team at the University of Guelph. The University of Guelph is a medium sized comprehensive research university in Guelph, Ontario, Canada and is a member of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL). Scott has been a librarian for 15 years and has a passion for all things acquisitions and collections. Special interests include the role of library consortia in... Read More →
avatar for Helen  Salmon

Helen Salmon

Information Resources Librarian, University of Guelph Library
- reading | - gardening


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Room 122, Addlestone Library 205 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:15pm

What is New and Innovative in the Journal Start-Up Space - Lessons from 3 New Journals. What Has Been Done; What Has Been Learned; and Where Are They Going Next?
Peter Binfield (slides)
Iain Hrynaszkiewicz (slides)
Mark Kurtz (slides)


The last 18 months have seen a number of new and interesting open access journals being started (for example PeerJ, F1000 Research, Elementa, e-Life, Cureus etc). Each of these start-ups have learned valuable lessons about the current journal market and how to promote and develop their new journals to the wider world. This panel of three representatives from PeerJ, F1000 Research and Elementa will briefly outline some of the lessons they have learnt as well as their future plans for each product. An open discussion with Q&A will then be moderated by Greg Tananbaum during which specific issues will be further explored.

Moderators
avatar for Greg Tananbaum

Greg Tananbaum

Owner, ScholarNext Consulting
Greg Tananbaum serves as a consultant to publishers, libraries, universities, and information providers as owner of ScholarNext (www.scholarnext.com). ScholarNext clients include Facebook, Microsoft, SPARC, Meta, and Annual Reviews.  He has been President of The Berkeley Electronic Press, as well as Director of Product Marketing for EndNote. Greg writes a regular column in Against the Grain covering emerging developments in the field of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Peter Binfield

Peter Binfield

Publisher and Co-Founder, PeerJ
avatar for Iain Hrynaszkiewicz

Iain Hrynaszkiewicz

Outreach Director, Faculty of 1000
Iain Hrynaszkiewicz (otherwise known as Iain H) joined Faculty of 1000 in 2013 as Outreach Director, where he leads initiatives to engage with and educate users of F1000’s services for life scientists and clinicians. This includes external communications, product development and partnership building to increase usage and grow the F1000 community. Iain is passionate about using the Web to make it easier to share and assess science, and in... Read More →
MK

Mark Kurtz

Senior Director, Strategic Development, BioOne


Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Acquiring Small Press Monographs: Trends and Analyses
In a publishing environment that is increasingly electronic and acquisition models that are demand driven, librarians at the University of Colorado are exploring current trends in acquiring small press monographs.

Social Sciences librarian Gene Hayworth conducted research using the data in WorldCat to examine library acquisitions of small press titles for the years 2008-2012. He generated a list of 430 small press publishers to see how many titles each press published in a given year, and how many libraries hold those titles. In addition, a random survey of collection development and acquisitions librarians will assess factors that influence purchase decisions for small press monographs. Using holdings data from WorldCat and survey responses co-authors will determine what types of small press titles are being purchased, whether or not this has changed over time, the impact of electronic publishing on library purchases of small press titles, and whether there are geographic (US/global) factors that come into play. This will provide an analysis of trends and patterns between the two sets of data, particularly in light of ALA's mission and stated interest in "Equity of Access" for all to the records of humanity.

Speakers
YF

Yem Fong

Professor & Director, Scholarly Resource Development, University of Colorado Boulder Libraries
GH

Gene Hayworth

Director of Social Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder
Gene Hayworth is the Director of Social Sciences at the University Libraries of the University of Colorado He received a BA in English from UNC-Greensboro in 1982, and an MLS from Syracuse University in 1995. He moved to Colorado in 1995 where he worked for CARL Corporation, and in the summer of 1999 he worked for CARL in Singapore. | | In 2011 he founded Owl Canyon Press, an independent publishing house based in Boulder, Colorado. In 2011 the... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Contemplating e-Scores: Open Ruminations on the e-Score, the Patron, the Library, and the Publisher
For several years now libraries, publishers, and vendors have worked out a means of creating, licensing, and delivering e-books in academic settings. While the art of the academic e-book is perhaps not quite yet perfected, conservatively speaking today’s students and faculty will find and use at least one e-book in the course of their academic career and be more or less satisfied with the experience. E-scores, however, are only now coming to occupy the attention of librarians, and not a moment too soon as commercial e-score vendors with sub-par quality content manage to meet the functionality needs of most users. Many living composers are harnessing the internet and cutting out the middle man by offering “e-scores” in the form of downloadable PDFs. Score publishers are by and large still in the early stages of thinking about moving to e-score format (also for personal downloads), and vendors with e-score platforms are negligible. This session seeks to open the conversation about e-scores to acquisition librarians, e-book publishers and vendors who typically work outside the music library.

During the first half of this session audience members will learn about the current state of e-scores in academic libraries, including what patrons want from e-scores, what score publishers are doing, what libraries are currently able to provide, and, finally, what commercial vendors are already doing. Audience members will bring their own e-book, publishing, technological, and acquisitions experience and expertise to the many issues surrounding e-scores by responding to a series of open questions presented to them during the second half of the session. Through this open questioning, it is hoped that audience members will come to new understandings of their own work with other electronic materials while at the same time bring their expertise to bear on the future of e-score development.

Speakers
LH

Lisa Hooper

Music & Media Librarian, Tulane University


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Creating Screen Literacy: Bridging the New Digital Divide
In a global culture and economy dominated by screens, society increasingly demands screen media literacy from everyone. It’s how we communicate. It’s how we learn. It’s how we interact. Now. But just as writing makes us better readers, true media literacy education must involve creating media.

This dynamic panel explores new approaches to digital media literacy and the potential impact on education, literacy programs, and learning. We will define what media literacy is now, how it is evolving, and how it is best achieved.

The discussion will explore how – using simple, accessible technology – people begin to take charge of their own media literacy by creating short films and ePortfolios themselves. We will showcase and discuss some of their work, outlining an approach that is practical, empowering, and transformative. These learning processes connect to all facets of technology usage, including homes, libraries, and schools, allowing people to acquire and apply a deeper, broader knowledge and understanding of screen media.

We will also take a look at the exigencies and benefits of expanding a practicum approach, along with potential successes, challenges, and significance as screen usage evolves. Focusing on both adults and young people, the panel will explore how the creation of small, relevant movies, and personal online ePortfolios, can enable deeper, more authentic learning and collaborative possibilities, allowing us all to communicate more effectively, to self assess more reflectively, and to thrive in a screen-based world.

Additionally, this discussion will address other key issues in digital media literacy including:

• Technology access issues including hardware, software and cloud-based applications.
• Screen media usage and program impact on library systems.
• Defining the new digital divide.
• The importance of creative thinking in a screen-based world.

Discussion will center around these issues along with the showing of several example films and websites.

Moderators
LJ

Lindsay Johnston

Managing Director, IGI Global
Ms. Johnston is currently the Managing Director at IGI Global, an academic reference publisher based in Hershey, Pennsylvania. During her time at IGI Global, she has procured hundreds of titles within five separate imprints and has made significant contributions to content strategy and new product development. She has previous experience in educational marketing, specializing in recruitment and public relations. In addition to her role as... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Paul Chilsen

Paul Chilsen

Associate Professor of Communication and Digital Media, Carthage College
Paul Chilsen started in Film & TV in Los Angeles, but left to pursue graduate school at Columbia College Chicago where he made the award-winning short "Gross Ratings." Paul was a Follet Fellow at Columbia and did postgraduate work at UW-Madison. He has directed and written feature films, documentaries, and Emmy-winning TV. A filmmaker and published author, he has taught at Columbia, Northwestern, and now Carthage College where he is Chair... Read More →
avatar for Todd Kelley

Todd Kelley

Vice President for Library and Information Services, Carthage College
avatar for Christine Wells

Christine Wells

Adjunct Faculty, Education Department, Carthage College
Christine Wells is a department chair, musical director, and K-8 music teacher in Deerfield, Illinois. A published author and National Board Certified teacher, she holds the M.Ed. from Carthage in Creative Arts, and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership. She focuses on teaching and integrating technology for teachers and students. Christine is also an adjunct faculty member of Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin, teaching... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Ebooks Down Under
Australian libraries have been early adopters of groundbreaking ebook initiatives for the past 10 years, helping to build and shape some of the innovative models and tools we use today. There has been a significant shift to e-preferred collection policies and ebook acquisition programs, including Demand-driven acquisition (DDA), are generally substantially larger and more established in Australia than North America.

In 2006, Swinburne was the first ever library to load the full EBL catalog into its library OPAC and make all titles available for immediate access using EBL's DDA model. Swinburne expends over 80% of its resources budget on electronic resources and provides access to more ebooks than print books.

Evidence from University of Western Australia shows that DDA is more effective in selecting relevant material for the collection. In 2012, DDA usage indicated 99.59% of titles auto-purchased by DDA saw further use. As a result, UWA is currently implementing an e-preferred strategy across all monographic acquisition processes.

This presentation will present and discuss studies from two institutions that have shaped ebook collections in Australia, and look back at the bold beginnings of Demand-driven Acquisitions and to where Australia is now - where a markedly more established ebook purchasing market exists.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Davies

Tony Davies

Manager, Information Support Services, Swinburne University of Technology
Tony started working as a librarian at Swinburne on a 2 week contract in 1987 and he's still there, although he has taken on a number of different jobs over the years including the newly created role of of Electronic Resources Librarian in 1993. He is currently manager of Information Support Services, which includes acquisitions, serials, datasets, cataloguing and resource management.
avatar for Michelle Morgan

Michelle Morgan

eBook Librarian, Information Resources Access Management, University of Western Australia
Michelle graduated from the post graduate diploma in Library and Information Studies in 2007 and initially worked in the public library sector. She began as a Senior Library Officer at UWA in 2009 and in 2010 she won a position as Institutional Repository Librarian & Ebook Librarian. She is currently the Ebook Librarian, the Budget Librarian, and an Electronic Resources Librarian at UWA. | Michelle's employment history prior to the world of... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Incorporating Ebooks into Humanities Scholarship: Results from a Combined Survey and Use Study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (A LibValue Study)
To answer a myriad of questions surrounding ebook adoption in the humanities, a multi-faceted research project, funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (via “LibValue,” http://libvalue.cci.utk.edu/ ) was undertaken at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library (UIUC). The study had two components. First, data were collected from ebook, patron-driven acquisition (PDA) in humanities subject areas via both STL (short term loan) and purchase-on- demand collection use through Ebrary. In some disciplines, Oxford University Press humanities ebooks were also purchased and monitored for use. Second, a survey was conducted of humanities faculty and graduate students from the same humanities disciplines as the PDA study: architecture, art, art history, classics, music and religion/theology.

Also pertinent to the study were the availability and use of corresponding print books at UIUC and the factors that determine why a humanities scholar would choose either an ebook or a pbook (print book). The survey asked scholars to comment on their view of the adoption of ebooks in the humanities, the value they determine or receive from the use of ebooks, their familiarity with various ebook platforms, the role of print books in an e-future, and when or why they would choose to use an ebook over a pbook.

Results show that most respondents (about 80% of whom were graduate students/ 20% faculty) had used ebooks before the study and most agreed that ebooks are easy to use and to access; almost 90% believe that ebooks should have the capability for some type of download. Only 17% of respondents said that over 50% of their research currently involves the use of ebooks; the most important “value” the humanists associated with ebooks was 24/7 accessibility. While the study’s outcomes focus on assessment of the humanist’s perception and use of ebooks, assessment of the library’s role in this evolution is also an important factor.

Library assessment for this project focused on performance and use of collections (both e and p), and included data by call number/subject, publisher and price. The assessment also included the availability and accessibility of both e and p books. The data show that although humanists may lag behind other disciplines in incorporating ebooks into their scholarly research, most have positive outlooks about ebook adoption and ask that more ebooks be made available to them in their humanities disciplines.

Speakers
TC

Tina Chrzastowski

Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Tina E. Chrzastowski is Professor Emerita, formerly Chemistry Librarian and Professor of Library Administration, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC).  Prior to UIUC, she held academic library positions at the University of Delaware and the University of Washington.  Her research focuses on collection use and assessment, including longitudinal use studies, user surveys, and musings about transitions taking place in... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions: Associate Professor University Libraries, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
JZ

Jean-Louise Zancanella

Public Services Librarian, College of Western Idaho Library


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Auditorium, Science and Mathematics Building 202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Libraries and their Role in Open Access: Challenges and Opportunities
The open access movement gains momentum with an increasing number of institutions and funders adopting open access mandates for their funded research. Consequently, an increasing amount of material becomes freely available, either from institutional repositories or from traditional or newly established journals. Libraries can play a dual role in supporting this movement: Firstly, they can provide services supporting the deposit of research output in their institutional repositories, including support for making it widely discoverable via indexes such as Google Scholar and library discovery systems. Secondly, libraries can make open access materials discoverable by their patrons through such indexes, thus expanding their collection to include materials that they would not necessarily license.

This session will describe the experience of the University Libraries of Liège in Belgium and Harvard. University of Liège chose a top-down approach and made it compulsory for researchers to deposit their output in the institutional repository—ORBi. To support this mandate, the library offers services that help researchers deposit and disseminate their publications. Both libraries—Liège and Harvard—enable their students and faculty to discover open access content beyond their library’s acquired collection via their library discovery system.

The session will also address challenges that arise from indexing open access publications and how index providers and libraries can deal with such publications, especially with articles that are deposited in different institutional repositories or published in so-called hybrid journals that contain a mix of open access and subscription articles.

Finally, we will discuss with the audience how they see libraries’ role evolving in this area, what challenges they are currently facing, and the solutions and opportunities they have found.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Morse

Laura Morse

Director, Library Systems, Harvard University
avatar for François Renaville

François Renaville

Systems Librarian, University of Liège Library
François Renaville been working as a systems librarian at the University of Liège Library since 2007 where he works on Aleph, SFX and Primo. He is also involved in Open Access projects (like ORBi) within the University of Liège since 2006. | He has also been working for three years as a policy officer for the Belgian French-speaking university library consortium BICfB. | Since June 2010, he has acted as chairman of the Association des... Read More →
CS

Christine Stohn

Senor Product Manager, Discovery & Delivery, Ex Libris
Christine Stohn is a senior product manager in the Discovery and Delivery business unit at Ex Libris, including Primo and bX. Christine has over 20 years of experience in the library industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. Christine holds a degree in library sciences from the Free University in Berlin and an information systems degree from the Open University in the UK.


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Making ‘Too Much’ Manageable and Discoverable: How Publishers, Vendors and Libraries Can Work Together to Help Users Unlock the Full Potential of Library Collections
In the land of ‘too much,’ it’s important to have different, creative acquisitions models available; that no matter the acquisitions model, materials are discoverable in a timely manner; and that workflows are streamlined so that librarians can focus on value-added tasks such as collection development rather than loading records and setting holdings.

As libraries integrate ‘just in time’ collection development strategies, management and discovery tools must support the creative (and complex) acquisitions models available from publishers and content providers. These new models provide great opportunities for libraries to connect users with relevant content. However, managing and maintaining accurate holdings information necessary for effective discovery is challenging.

How can publishers, vendors, and libraries work together to optimize discovery, shorten the timeframe from when a title is available to when it is discoverable, and relieve some of the burden on libraries of maintaining holdings? One word, libific. The panel will share more about this exciting initiative currently underway.

Speakers
JH

Jesse Holden

Director of Acquisitions, USC
avatar for Alexandra de Lange

Alexandra de Lange

Head of Third-Party Platform Relations, Elsevier Science
Alexandra de Lange is the Head of Third-Party Platforms in Elsevier. In this role she is responsible for strategy and policy development as well as product- and partnership management related to discoverability of content published on ScienceDirect.  ScienceDirect is Elsevier’s full-text platform where researchers can read and interact with content from over 2,500 journals and 26,000 e-books. Recent developments in the area of... Read More →
JL

John Law

Vice President of Discovery Services, ProQuest
As vice president of discovery solutions, John Law leads a dynamic team that builds information solutions aimed at getting librarians and end-users to their information "discovery moment" effortlessly. John was the visionary and development leader behind the ground-breaking Summon™ web-scale discovery service, providing instant access to the full breadth of a library’s collections. For more than a decade, John has focused on... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Historic District 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

Navigating the Flow of Value-Streams to the Seas of Collection Management, Acquisition, and Preservation.
At UNLV Libraries, the practices for gathering and mending damaged materials had created an amorphous backlog which negatively impacted users’ access and the Libraries’ return on investment (ROI). An initial-state review of the process revealed (a) no apparent process owner existed; (b) an unwieldy backlog developed; (c) no value-adding actions were developed for determining what should be mended, or setting turn-around times; (d) no standardized methods of evaluation were created to link procedures to stakeholder goals. After review of the initial state, value-streams were identified based on users’ needs and workflows—a central gathering place was created with daily pickups, as well as an evaluation process—which then transformed flow into various value-streams based on collection criteria and ROI. A future state was then set to embrace both users’ value and ROI outcomes. Value-adding actions of the future state include (a) eliminating backlog and sustain one-piece flow; (b) deliver 24-48 hour turn-around times; (c) provide more time for highly trained staff to pursue divisional initiatives and key workflow within Special Collections; (d) establish the Preservation Laboratory as a focal point for preservation outreach and education.

Speakers
MF

Michael Frazier

Book and Paper Conservator, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV Libraries)
GV

Greg Voelker

Continuing Resources Lifecycle Coordinator, UNLV
RZ

Richard Zwiercan

Access Resource Manager, University of Nevada, Las Vegas


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:15pm

New Online Workflow Tools and their Implications for the Distribution, Use, and Management of Research Outputs
The last few years have seen a significant growth in the number of online tools being offered to researchers that pledge to embed themselves in their workflows and significantly enhance their efficiency and effectiveness. This session will look at two types of these tools – those which focus primarily on managing content (like Zotero, Papers, PubGet, Mendeley, RefWorks, EndNote, and ReadCube) and those which focus primarily on individuals and collaboration (like academia.edu and ResearchGate), although many of these demonstrate attributes of both types, even though their provenance and key strength lie with one group or the other.

In this session:
  • a university librarian will share with us how she has incorporated some of these tools into her own workflows and into the services which she makes available to her library users. She will assess their strengths and weaknesses and examine the challenges that can arise as a result of the development and growth of these tools.
  • an A&I service provider will share his thoughts on how information discovery players can ensure that their services both enhance, and may be enhanced by, the functionality offered to users by these new tools. 

Both speakers will also provide insights into how end users are deploying these tools, looking at what they find useful, what they don’t, and what additional tools they would like to see developed.

Come to this session either to learn how you can benefit from using some of these tools, or to share your current experience of using any of them.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Gedye

Richard Gedye

Director of Outreach Programmes, STM
RICHARD GEDYE has worked in academic journals publishing since 1986, firstly at Macmillan. In 1991 he joined Oxford University Press where he held a number of positions, including director of sales, marketing, and research. In 2002 he helped found COUNTER, an international organization which has established a code of practice for vendor-based online usage statistics, and which he chaired for eight years. Since January 2011, Richard has been... Read More →
avatar for Helen Josephine

Helen Josephine

Head of the Engineering Library, Stanford University
Helen Josephine is the Head Librarian at the Terman Engineering Library at Stanford University. She is the subject liaison and bibliographer for the School of Engineering departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Electrical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering. She also offers workshops and consultation to all students and faculty on campus on citation management tools and research databases. She is the Stanford University... Read More →
avatar for Eric Swenson

Eric Swenson

Director of Product Management, Scopus, Scopus | Elsevier
Eric has worked at the forefront of digital media, publishing and information services for more than 20 years, most recently with Elsevier's Science & Technology Division since 2011. Eric is currently responsible for product management and design for Scopus, Elsevier's premier abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature. Previously, he managed Elsevier’s free search & discovery platforms, SciVerse Hub and Scirus, respectively... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Historic District 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:15pm

Open Access Publishing Funds in Action: The Experience at Three Libraries
As journal publishing moves from a subscription-based model to an author-pays model, many universities and libraries are establishing funds to pay authors' article publishing charges. This session will provide examples of open access funds at three different kinds of institutions—a major research university, a health science university, and a comprehensive university. Attendees will gain an understanding of why these funds were established and how they are supported, promoted, and managed. Each panelist will present a case study describing the structure, performance, reception, and long-term sustainability of his or her institution's open access fund.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Champieux, MLIS

Robin Champieux, MLIS

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University
Robin Champieux is the Scholarly C